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Discussion Starter #41
WHen I first made my first set of jumps, I glued everything together and when later breakage occurred also ran into the problem of how to fix everything.

Now, I no longer glue anything. All the PVC fittings are tight enough, without glue, that they stay together during normal use. And if I am grabbing armfuls to move them around and they do disconnect, it's an easy fix to just reattach.

Also, I bit the bullet and now buy jump cup strips. My first jumps with the 't's I cut also started breaking as time passed. Love love love the strips cause they have ALL the jump heights so if I'm doing jump training or have other smaller dogs (or a NEW PUPPY) I can easily adjust. And the strips are just so easy to put on the jumps. Clean Run: Clip and Go Jump Cup Strips



The issue with the wooden jumps are they are HEAVY. Specially if you add the wings. Then they can be heavy and bulky. Plus you have the maintenance of painting every few years if you leave them outdoors.

I just use the regular PVC in the plumbing aisle at Loews/Home Depot for all my jumps. I do NOT paint them, at the most I use electrical tape to mark the bars. My jumps now seem to last for years and years. With me no longer glueing if there is breakage it just takes a sec to put in a replacement piece.
 

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Thanks MRL. I decided to go with the individual cups, not the strips. The strips limit me to PVC, and I think I'd like to instead make my new jumps from wood. It's bulkier, no question- but I have plenty of room for storage and muscle for lifting. Also, if Pimg lands on a bar and breaks the cup- it would have ruined the whole strip. With these, replacing a singular cup is no big deal.

This is what I went with:
Clean Run: Clip and Go Flat-back Single Jump Cups
 

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I wonder how many of you expected to see this picture any time soon (probably a couple of you for sure!) Pimg didn't do so hot with the tire jump at her trial yesterday. So of course today I got the parts to build one. Here's our progress for the night:


I thought I might post a couple tips:
  • Draw out your plan. I am designing it in my head and didn't draw anything out. I ended up gluing a couple pieces (the upright sections) in backwards. Not a big deal, but it would have looked nicer had I drawn it out and stuck with the plan.
  • If you are going to do angled supports for the uprights, be sure to get four way corners from Clean Run. Duh! I forgot that the legs won't line up with the uprights, and therefore I will need to do some tricky combos to make the uprights work.
  • I looked at a LOT of pics and saw a LOT of people using 1.5" PVC. It always has a bow in the center of the top cross piece from the weight of the tire (which isn't much). Do yourself a favor as I have done and spend the couple extra bucks for 2" PVC. This thing is very rigid. Considering how tall a tire jump is, I think the strength of the 2" plus the angled supports are necessary. I'm afraid as soon as the dog catches their feet on the tire "that one time" it would break 1.5" PVC connectors. Especially if they have become brittle in the sun...
And a couple hints:
  • Although it seems like it will be difficult to form the tire from corrugated drainage hose, it is actually REALLY easy. Don't be intimidated by it.
  • Once you find the spot where you think you should cut to end up with a 24" inner diameter tire, cut a couple rings bigger. You can always cut more off later. I thought I had found the right spot, and ended up with a tire about 23" diameter. Lesson learned (I swear I learned that lesson a LONG time ago!)
  • After looking all over the place for colored duct tape, I finally found it at Michaels craft store. It's pricy at $4.99 for 20yards, but two rolls is *just* enough to wrap the tire.
Here is my inspiration for the design:
Build It Yourself Agility Tire Jump - With Help From The Camp Bandy Store

And here you can see the sag in their upper cross bar from the 1.5" PVC:
 

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Almost done with the tire jump. The support frame is complete, as is the tire. For the stretchy rubber straps that hold the tire in the middle, I used 48" long tarp straps. All I have left to do is to measure for all the different heights and install the eyebolts. I will also hacksaw off the extra length on the four eyebolts at each corner since Pimg could catch a foot on the bottom ones, and I could poke my eyes on the top ones!

 

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Discussion Starter #45 (Edited)
Not so sure I'd keep those elbow/railing type entry. Really makes the 'look' different PLUS it will absolutely affect the turns coming and going to the tire jump. THe more advance courses will start having slices to the tire and you won't be able to practice the angles with your current plan.

I'm betting if you just disconnect the higher parts the jump will still stand up with only the supports that are along the ground.



Simplier like this with just supports coming straight out towards camera and straight back to the wall and on the ground...

From the site you linked THIS is more the final look:
 

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Hmmm... I didn't really think about that. I think the upright braces (of some sort) need to be there to ensure the longevity of the equipment. I should be able to switch out to steel braces, and make them much smaller though.

haha- so again- big tip: draw out your design first! It doesn't always work to build it on the fly!
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Have to say, I'd pass on the braces. Just more to trip over and they won't be at any trial. I'd just cut off the end 'Y' joints you have and put a cap on the end pieces.



 

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I agree with getting rid of the braces... if you are worried about stability, just put a couple small sand bags on the feet. None of my tire jumps have ever had a stability prob though.
 

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Well I thought I'd be a smartass and go find a SG world trial with a tire jump with braces. But in the end, I found very few. :) And the ones that did have bracing were pretty small overall. For me, I consider this to be a competition quality tire jump:


...And that's why I didn't have an issue putting in braces. I do plan on rebuilding it without braces (already got the replacement PVC). I'll try it out like that for a while and if I find a structural issue- I'll add some aluminum square stock like in the pic above.
 

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The tire jump is complete omitting cutting down the chain to the proper length:


I added hooks for all the standard jump heights: 8, 12, 16, 20, 22, 24, 26 as well:


I just need to take the chain back to Lowes and have them cut it down where I marked it. I think it turned out nice, and for now, I think you guys were right to persuade me to take the bracing out.
 

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Really, after taking all the bracing out- this thing is probably easier to make than a single bar jump! You'll be fine! lol

...But hey! I'd love to find an awesome GSD person to hang out with. I'd build you one... :)

[EDIT]- yikes. Not sure that came out right. I know you're married. I meant it would be cool to have at least one friend who also had a GSD... lol!!
 

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Achielles UD- I am hoping to get some tips on the teeter in the background of this image:



I am in the process of planning a DIY teeter and am interested in this design. I was going to weld up a steel frame, but what you have here would be a lot cheaper. I am curious how well it suits your purposes and am hoping you can provide some tips.

  • Do you find the wood base to be adequte in width and length? It looks kinda small in the pic. Have you ever had it tip over?
  • Do you see an issue with drilling holes up the center of that middle upright to create adjustability?
  • How did you create the pivot point on the underside of the board? Is it a piece of pipe with a bar through it? I have had a hard time finding two pipes in the hardware store with the proper inner and outer diameters to create a nice hinge. VERY curious on what you used here.
  • I am a bit concerned about the weight of the 2x12. I know there are standards about how fast the board must fall. But most competition teeters (that I've seen) are aluminum. While I haven't had the oppertunity to lift one, I assume the wood is much heavier. Does this cause an issue in fall rate? Do you see a need in creating adjustability in the fall rate?
  • Do you have any issues with teeter whip when using a wood board like this? Do you see a need plank stabilization at all?
I'll PM you to make you aware of this post, but I am hoping you can reply publicly for the benefit of others. :)
 

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Hey Wildo!

Sorry! I didn't get your PM and notice this until logging on tonight.

Yes what you found is very (practically the same thing) similar to what I built. I have built 2 now and have found them to be quite sturdy and stable.

It may look small due to the angle or lighting (I am at work... shh ;) ) but I can't see it to know which picture you are referring to lol. It is a 12 foot board and 12 inches wide. I've had some pretty large dogs on it (even kids and a drunken husband and sister! lol) and it has never tipped over.

We drilled the holes to fit pretty snug so the only issue there is it can be a bugger to get the pipe through at times. We covered the pipe with bicycle handle rubber grips ;) I think we could smooth out the holes to make it easier to adjust the height.

The link you posted in the previous post is exactly how we did the pipe to the board with a nice pivot/hinge. Those little "U" type thing-a-ma-bobs :)

The board itself is heavy but I haven't had any issues. We timed the fall. The 1" is about correct. The weight of the board makes no difference in the fall rate, it is where you place the pipe/pivot point. Mine have a 2 second drops with a 3 pound weight at the end of the board. I am sure you can adjust this to whatever you'd like to meet regulations.

I haven't needed to add extra stabilizing. The board is pretty rigid and in teaching 2o2o, I haven't noticed any teeter whipping either.

I am envious of the aluminum teeters, just because they weigh less, but if you are planning on welding steel, until you can afford or get an aluminum (like I keep saying I will eventually do lol) I'd go wood. It may end up being lighter weight than the steel and I find it holds up pretty well! :)

I'll try to post a few better pictures! (after work of course! lol)
 

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Awesome- thanks for the response! With the base that I linked to only being 20" wide, I was concerned about stability. Sounds like that will not be an issue- not to mention I could always weight it if it turned out to be an issue.

Drilling of the holes could be an issue. I decided to go with a 3/4" pipe as the pivot compared to the recommended 1/2". When I measure it, the outside diameter is about 1 3/32". So even though I have a 1" auger bit, I think I will need to sand out the hole a little bit. It sounds like if yours is that snug then you probably don't have any issues with the pipe creeping out over time? I have a solution to this, but am not sure it's even an issue.

I know the board is heavy- I was more concerned about the inertia you have to overcome to get it moving. Regardless of the pivot point, I would think the heavier board will start tipping later than a lighter one. This is probably not a big deal. As of now, I have all the supplies to add stabilization. I think I'll do some experiments to see if I feel it's needed for the safety of my dog.

Finally- I am curious if you have an issue moving the teeter around. Fully assembled- I'm sure it's not too light. I was thinking about building some retractable wheels into the base. I don't have any help to move it around, so lifting and carrying it could be a chore. Thoughts on this?

Thanks!
 

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Pretty much got my teeter done. Still have a couple odds and ends to finish up, mostly painting the base (I hate painting). Here's what I did:

The plank is totally complete, though I may choose to stiffen it with some steel like I did on my dog walk:


I used these floor mounts to screw the galvanized pipe into so it can't accidently work out. I should have drilled the holes bigger so they sit flush- I didn't think about that. I may still modify them so they sit flush. I was concerned that the pipe may eventually work out of the base when in use causing a serious accident and fear of the teeter. This setup will not allow that to happen:


I put a cap on the other side of the pipe, kinda like a handle so that your hands don't get chewed up on the threads. I also need to get some washers to act as standoffs for the pipe clamps on the plank. I also need to calibrate the drop rate still:
 

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Finally finished Pimg's teeter:




I redrilled the receiving side so that the galvanized pipe floor mounts could be flush mounted:


I also used a jump strip from Clean Run to identify the teeter height:


...Next up: A-Frame (though it's going to be a while)
 

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Wow!!! Fantastic job!! I actually want to start at home Agility with my female Bella, she is so athletic and easy to train but she gets so car sick I cant bring her any where far. Thanks for sharing!!
 

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Discussion Starter #60
I LOVE the jump cup strips. They are a softer plastic than the PVC, so are more flexible, so if they fall or a ball is tossed into them, they give instead of breaking.

Wildo, my jumps have lasted for years and years with the regular white unpainted PVC.... I wondering if the painting (specially the dark blue?) is actually contributing to the breakdown of the PVC? Like a white car is cooler in the summer cause it reflects the heat?

I leave mine out in the yard all year long too... :confused:

 
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