Prance heeling & related back injuries. - German Shepherd Dog Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 42 (permalink) Old 06-11-2015, 02:48 AM Thread Starter
New Member
 
sablecoat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 14
Prance heeling & related back injuries.

Hi,

A discussion that has come up as of late at my local SchH club is the consequence of 'prance heeling'. Ergo when the dog has his head lifted up, front legs kicking out in front, back legs 'collected' under him.

Some trainers claim that these dogs will not be able to work for as long as dogs that have been taught a 'looser' focus heel, purely due to the strain this puts on a dogs' back.

To make matters worse, we do have a dog that has a semi-prance heel and was diagnosed with back/spine/cruciate ligament issues at age 5.

What experiences do you guys have with prance heeling and related health issues? None at all? Or are there specific ways to avoid injuries through, for example, stretching and proper warm-up?

It's such a pretty focus heel, but I wouldn't want to put more strain than necessary on my dog.
sablecoat is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 42 (permalink) Old 06-11-2015, 08:46 AM
Crowned Member
 
Jax08's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: NNE PA
Posts: 30,079
I have heard from more than one person that their chiropractor said the focused heeling is the worst part of IPO for their neck.




Jax08 is offline  
post #3 of 42 (permalink) Old 06-11-2015, 09:02 AM
Crowned Member
 
onyx'girl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: SW, MI
Posts: 27,287
I tend to agree it is hard on a GSD...Mals have it perfected and their structure can handle it with ease.
My male is tall, long in body and for him to keep that motion going for long is hard on him, so I don't demand it of him, as long as he is with me he won't get a correction if he looks away for a second or two.
If the judge wants to take points for it, so be it.

Jane~
Kept by
Gambit zu Treuen Handen

Guinness auf der Marquis...Karlo son!

Always in my heart
Karlo aka Gideon vom Wildhaus
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
3.02.09~12.03.18
Kacie
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
7.21.05-5.01.15
Onyx
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
11.08.06-9.28.18
onyx'girl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 42 (permalink) Old 06-11-2015, 10:43 AM
Crowned Member
 
holland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 5,726
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyx'girl View Post
I tend to agree it is hard on a GSD...Mals have it perfected and their structure can handle it with ease.
My male is tall, long in body and for him to keep that motion going for long is hard on him, so I don't demand it of him, as long as he is with me he won't get a correction if he looks away for a second or two.
If the judge wants to take points for it, so be it.
Its good that you have that attitude-dogs lives are just not long enough
holland is offline  
post #5 of 42 (permalink) Old 06-11-2015, 12:34 PM
Crowned Member
 
GatorDog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 4,685
My male had crap heeling for 6 years and had more chiropractor issues so far than my 2 year old with excellent focused heeling. My chiropractor never said that she has any more medical concerns because of her heeling style. She's well exercised and well muscled in general.
GatorDog is offline  
post #6 of 42 (permalink) Old 06-11-2015, 12:43 PM
Crowned Member
 
G-burg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 6,661
Is the issues because the dogs head is up and stretched back?

What about dogs that have a prancy gait but their heads are turned more side ways and slightly tilted up?

I've had a chiropractor tell me that tracking your dog for long periods of time are bad for the dogs neck too? So who knows!

Leesa~

Chaos v. Wildhaus, SchH2, OB3 (HOT) Forever in my heart ~ Bismark v. Wildhaus, SchH1 (HOT) ~ Kougar v. Wolfstraum, IPO 1, CGC (HOT)... Oberon v. Wildhaus, BH (HOT)
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
G-burg is offline  
post #7 of 42 (permalink) Old 06-11-2015, 03:31 PM
Crowned Member
 
mycobraracr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,847
People come up with all sorts of weird theories. How can we say it's the heeling that caused it? Not maybe running full speed into a hard bite sleeve multiple times a week? At the end of the day, these dogs are no different than any other athletes. At some point injuries happen. Over years of competing and training bodies just break down. Dog or human, no difference. If people are not willing to take the risk, then don't play.
mycobraracr is offline  
post #8 of 42 (permalink) Old 06-11-2015, 03:35 PM
Crowned Member
 
G-burg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 6,661
Exactly Jeremy!

I was going to say in the grand scheme of things - the sport is physically hard on our dogs..

Leesa~

Chaos v. Wildhaus, SchH2, OB3 (HOT) Forever in my heart ~ Bismark v. Wildhaus, SchH1 (HOT) ~ Kougar v. Wolfstraum, IPO 1, CGC (HOT)... Oberon v. Wildhaus, BH (HOT)
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
G-burg is offline  
post #9 of 42 (permalink) Old 06-11-2015, 03:53 PM
Crowned Member
 
mycobraracr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,847
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-burg View Post
Exactly Jeremy!

I was going to say in the grand scheme of things - the sport is physically hard on our dogs..

Not just our dogs. People too. Look at the helpers who catch the dogs at 30+ mph. Tell me their backs or shoulders aren't out of wack. Handlers get injured and take a beating. It's just the way it is. Funny thing is, the better I get at decoying, the more injuries I get. The better I get, the more confident I am. The more confident I am, the more I push the edge to bring that little extra out of a dog. The more I push the edge, the more I get injured/bit. It's a risk we all take.
mycobraracr is offline  
post #10 of 42 (permalink) Old 06-11-2015, 04:22 PM
Crowned Member
 
Jax08's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: NNE PA
Posts: 30,079
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-burg View Post
Is the issues because the dogs head is up and stretched back?

What about dogs that have a prancy gait but their heads are turned more side ways and slightly tilted up?

I've had a chiropractor tell me that tracking your dog for long periods of time are bad for the dogs neck too? So who knows!
I think so, Leesa. It's the hyper extension. Same thing my chiro tells me about looking down on a computer all day or when I"m in the field and my head is tilted up most of the day. Extension over an extended period of time.

Why would tracking be bad? I don't get that one. They aren't fully extended and it's a fairly natural movement?




Jax08 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome