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A Smithsonian article couple years back claimed that the DNA difference between a wolf and a dog is maybe .03-.04% . Interesting that all the divergence in domestic dogs--Maltese to Great Dane, Corgi to Irish Wolfhound--developed within this tiny sliver.

I had a very little bit of direct experience here. My late brother owned a wolf hybrid dog. Malamute x gray wolf, I believe. Certainly the dog element was malamute. I was never a particular fan of hybridizing wolves as domestic pets, and this particular wolf dog wasn't my favorite animal. That said, my brother truly loved him, and my parents who spent a lot of time around him also liked him. That said, I would not think adding a higher dose of wolf input into a GSD would do much for the working dog traits. This wolf/dog was reasonably biddable as to the very basics--sit, stay, come. But he was not a particularly attentive watch dog. I never saw him do anything like the rhythmic explosive barking you'd see out of a GSD warning someone off or holding a decoy at bay. One predictable behavior I recall about him was resource guarding, directed almost entirely toward food. Granted, I wasn't around him constantly. But he lived to 11-12, and over years of visits, these behaviors remained pretty consistent.

An adult wolf would be hard-wired to survive in a cooperative pack element. Where we see a lot of references on this forum that one's GSD does not need the company of other dogs to live out its life, a wolf absolutely has to have that social cooperation aspect to stay alive. Even a sickly elk or moose can knock the crap out of a single predator with a hoof, or run it through with an antler. Even smaller prey like whitetail deer would be pretty hard for a single wolf to chase down.

I think it is still fairly well accepted that dogs tend to closely resemble juvenile wolves in their development or socialization. Interesting quote on this pasted in below:

Understanding dog behavior rightly begins with with a study of wolf behavior. However, a long history of domestication behaviorally segregates dogs from wolves, and one must take care not to overly generalize between the two canids in terms of their respective motivations and behavior patterns…Selective breeding has altered developmental rates, behavioral thresholds for the display of dominant and submissive behavior, behavioral tendencies and temperament traits, social bonding, and trainability….Dogs never fully mature but remain in most respects at a developmental stage resembling that of a juvenile wolf...In the transformation from lupus to familiaris, wolves lose many of the well-defined agonistic rituals that ordinarily promote close and cooperative social interaction...the wolf’s highly predictable dominance ritual has disintegrated into an assortment of independent behavioral fragments…submission displays have also degenerated under the influence of domestication...In the place of clearly defined and unambiguous signals has arisen a collection of generalized signals that promote social promiscuity through exaggerated care-seeking behaviors, various active and passive submission fragments, and the perpetuation of a juvenile tolerance for varied and close social contact. In comparison with the wolf’s highly organized and integrated social structure, the dog appears disjointed, confused, unpredictable, and fragmented.” - Steven R. Lindsay

So I'm not sure what the eastern bloc breeders were after with injecting a new round of wolf-genetics, but I'm not surprised that it apparently did not work, and got dropped.
If they wanted the formable characteristics of a juvenile wolf, they already had that in a dog.
The adult wolf would be a "hard" animal indeed, but hard in different ways from a working dog.
 

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So, any talk about pedigrees eventually ends up in behaviors, and that ends up in specifics, and what? That's it? Mods, seriously why would anyone post anything here?

Getting a bit overzealous are we?!
 

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@tim_s_adams this sub forum is for discussions about pedigrees.A long detailed training and behavior discussion deserves it's own thread and has it's own sub forum.
Why would anyone post here?To share and discuss facts and opinions regarding pedigrees.
Overzealous?You and berno maybe;) A spirited exchange in one of the training sub forums is welcomed.
 
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