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So much for that idea. Ran out and got a big bottle of bitter apple spray and then hoses down all three leashes with it. Just got back from a glorious walk through a wooded area in our neighborhood.

While the walk was great and Kaiser was well behaved he still enjoyed biting at his leash and the other dog's leashes too. Oh well.

To a degree it wasn't as bad as it was before, but he still did it. I'll hose the leashes down again and see if maybe he'll do it less each time.

I think behavioral modification is going to be the answer. I need to learn to calm him down and give him something else to focus on instead of biting the leash.

What he's doing is like a little kid pulling at his parent's hand going 'come on Dad! The fun is over there! Hurry up!' which isn't such a bad thing.
 

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Yeah, I think that stuff only really works when it's actually wet. That leash biting thing is something he'll probably grow out of, you may be able to just ignore it and keep right on walking. My pup did that for about a week, and then just lost interest. But, a floppy tug toy is a good thing to use to distract him, and if he gets to like it now, it can help down the road if he ever shows any leash aggression. Good luck!
 

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Instead of trying to stop him, why don't you give him something to hold in his mouth Like a tug or a ball. It is satisfying for a dog to carry something.

My dog likes to go for the leash too and I let him sometimes pull me along when I'm on my bike but when I tell him 'off' he release's. I think that is the important thing. An 'off' command. Then when you feel like it you can let him 'get it' and then release it again.
 

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I think behavioral modification is going to be the answer. I need to learn to calm him down and give him something else to focus on instead of biting the leash.
Better to use dogs natural instincts rather than try to change them if possible.

Some dogs love tug and it sounds like yours will. By controlling the game and developing it, the dog will become calm and focused. It is a great way to develop obedience in high energy dogs.
 

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Dogs with drive, see dictionary for picture of GSD next to definition, don't CARE about minor annoyances.

Banjo once grabbed my weed-eater while I was trimming. I had it going full blast, an Echo commercial grade, essentially a moped strapped to a trimmer head. He stopped it. yanked it from my hands and had words with it. He didn't like it at all. Here is what said trimmer did to my leg when I slipped weed-eating a hill.


That took all of 1/2 a second, my leg slipped into the path of the strings, I yanked back as fast as possible. Now think of how much that hurt Banjo to stick that in his mouth, bite down and stop the head. Did it stop him from going after it again once I made sure he wasn't wounded (too bad at least)....NOPE. I had to stuff him in the house to finish up and from that point on. Some yucky tasting stuff on that fun fun fun leash isn't going to stop a GSD.
 

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My girl was absolutely immune to bitter apple. She licked it off the stuff I put it on. I ended up using hot sauce on a couple things. For the leash biting, I would use behavior modification instead. Maybe when he pulls the leash stop moving completely, put him in a sit and start over. Or give him something to carry in his mouth, like a favorite retrieve toy, ball, etc. I'm not sure what will help but just putting bitter stuff on the leash will not teach him to not bite on it.
 

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take the leash away from him and say "no" or "no leash"
or whatever phrase you want to use. take control. he
won't stop immediately but with practice/training he'll learn.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
meh - given the results of the bitter apple I'll find something entertaining to use it for instead. I'll skip the hot sauces, mace and other punishing type approaches and just focus on behaviors.

What I have now is a dog that is jumping around and hard to get on to the leash, while jumping around he is biting at his leash and the other dogs leashes too (Whether they are on the other dogs or not).

What I want is a dog that upon seeing me get the leashes out he goes to the door and sits, waits for me and then lets me get him on leash and then we leave for our walk.

I don't think I can get to that behavior in one step so I'll have to build him up to it. I'll talk with my trainer and see how she would go about it.
 

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Bitter apple is a crapshoot with dogs. Some of our dogs here will act like it's acid on their tongue, and Aiden (the only one who we used to WISH acted like it was acid) will lick it right off your hand.

Our pit bull likes to chew the leash, and she can chew it in half in three chomps. (She's gone through quite a few leashes). The only thing that seems to get her to quit is to grab the leash on both sides of her mouth and yank it back toward her. Trying to take it from her is like a game of tug for her and so she just hangs on more and keeps chewing the leash, but when I yank it back INTO her mouth, she doesn't like that and leaves it alone.
 

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how old is your dog? with training your dog will sit and wait
to be leash and have his collar put on. maybe you should
walk the pup first. training will be easier with walking
the pup without the other dogs. with training you'll be
able to teach your dog to get his leash when it's time to go out.
train, train, train and socialize, socialize, socialize. be consistent
in your training and don't expect a lot in the begining. don't
depend on gadgets, sprays, collars or harness. depend on training
and socialize. there's no short cuts in training and socializing.

meh - given the results of the bitter apple I'll find something entertaining to use it for instead. I'll skip the hot sauces, mace and other punishing type approaches and just focus on behaviors.

What I have now is a dog that is jumping around and hard to get on to the leash, while jumping around he is biting at his leash and the other dogs leashes too (Whether they are on the other dogs or not).

>>>>>> What I want is a dog that upon seeing me get the leashes out he goes to the door and sits, waits for me and then lets me get him on leash and then we leave for our walk.<<<<<<

I don't think I can get to that behavior in one step so I'll have to build him up to it. I'll talk with my trainer and see how she would go about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Kaiser is about 8months old now.

The training is what we are doing, the delay is my own education. Dogs don't speak English so I gotta learn to speak dog.
 

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You pretty much have to TRAIN the dog not to like bitter apple....by making it a strong aversive but there are better ways to train than that.

Probably not wise to have the dog loose in the yard while running any kind of power equipment.
 

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What I want is a dog that upon seeing me get the leashes out he goes to the door and sits, waits for me and then lets me get him on leash and then we leave for our walk.
It might be hard. I'd just aim for the dog to be calm and willing to sit to get his leash on and not drag you out the door.

You have to examine the whole process and see when does the dog start getting excited. Then you need to teach the dog to be calm and submissive during those processes.

Some dogs will get excited if you put on your shows or jacket. My friends dog knows the difference between his work shoes and his walking shoes. When he's going to work the dog ignores him and when going for a walk he runs around getting excited and barking.

Basically your dog can read your actions like a book.

So you have to show the dog, picking up the leash does not mean you are going for a walk. Basically you need to demotivate the dog through each process which usually makes him excited.

Pick up the leash, put it back, pick it up put it back. Put on your shoes, take them off, put on your jacket, take it off again. leash the dog, bring him to the door, then bring him back and put away the leash, then do it again and again etcetc. Improvise and take your time.

You basically confuse the dog and let him know, all the old triggers are calming rather than excitable. He doesn't get what he wants by getting excited. He has to wait for you.

Generally I will ask a dog to sit and before i put a lead on him and will usually wait until he is totally calm. It might take weeks to achieve some level of calmness but you just work towards that patiently.

You have to put up with a bit of excitement as you have nurtured that since you got the dog.

As I said up stream you should be working with the dogs natural instinct to tug etc rather than trying to suppress it. You have to teach the dog that you will provide really good play time but you also expect a level of discipline. As a trainer/owner you need to develop up your own understanding of training and dog behavior.
 

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Do you have a trainer you could go to for OB?

I get what you mean about the language barrier, that's where a good trainer will help you out the most.

It's a lot to 'unpack' over the net, with many different theories floating around. You'll achieve your goals faster with the help of trainer IMHO.

Happy training!

:)
 

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A quick fix to this is Sure unscented aerosol deodorant. It makes Bitter Apple taste like liver paste!

We spray it on dog beds, leashes, wires and even the back of little kids pants if we have a dog that likes to "herd" children.
 
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