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These are our x-rays we received today. Our vet recommends a hip replacement in the future; in the meantime lots of exercise and supplements. The breeder says his bones aren't fully formed and we have to wait, it's too early to diagnose unless it's severe. The vet says things don't normally get better.
We are heartbroken.
 

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What several very good vets have told me is that you don't plan intervention based on the x-rays, you instead decide what to do based on the dog. In other words, what are the dog's clinical symptoms? Dogs with nearly identical x-rays looking "severe" can present with radically different symptoms -- one nearly lame, the other very active with barely any noticeable hitch. Intervention often depends on the severity of the symptoms, not just the xrays.

Some dogs need surgery (though often a FHO and not a THR). Other dogs simply don't because they're well managed with supplements, Adequan, and good therapeutic exercise to keep them strong and limber. My vets (and even an orthopedist) told me to start with non-surgical approaches, and see how well they work -- many dogs never need more than that. My good friends have senior dog with the very worst hips their vet has ever seen in an xray -- she's been on a raw diet and Adequan injections since she was a young adult, and she's been very active her whole life, as a very happy dog. Only now as an old dog is she showing some arthritis and needing a little more help (and she's starting acupuncture).

Wait and see how your dog develops. If your vet knows of nothing but surgery and pain meds, I'd seek second opinion with a more progressive vet with a bigger bag of tricks and broader perspective.
 

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Wait until 12 months old, find a vet who know how to shoot a proper xray, and get them re-done. I agree with Magwart - some dogs go their whole lives asymptomatic and without pain. So keeping them lean, providing low impact exercise and joint supplements is beneficial and may be all that is needed.

I honestly am not sure how the vet determined anything with the poor positioning on that xray. The sockets do look shallow, but really, at this age, and with that xray, it would be a guess at best.

I would be very upset if my vet charged me for that xray or even made some sort of a diagnosis from it.
 
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