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Hello I am getting a GSD puppy at the end of April, a little girl. Well I just received a call from a breeder telling me that they have a litter of pups that will be ready to go next week. I had originally wanted a pup from him but was told that they would not be having any pups for over a year. Well as it turned out things happened and now they have 8 cute little pups. Never having had two pups like this at one time do you think it would be a mistake and that it would be kind of unfair to them because they would not be getting the same amount of attention that I would be able to give to just one since they will be so young.My gut feeling is to go with just one and then get another when my little girl is around 6-9 months old. Have many of you reading this raised two at the same time and if so what would you suggest? Thanks :confused:
 

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Hello I am getting a GSD puppy at the end of April, a little girl. Well I just received a call from a breeder telling me that they have a litter of pups that will be ready to go next week. I had originally wanted a pup from him but was told that they would not be having any pups for over a year. Well as it turned out things happened and now they have 8 cute little pups. Never having had two pups like this at one time do you think it would be a mistake and that it would be kind of unfair to them because they would not be getting the same amount of attention that I would be able to give to just one since they will be so young.My gut feeling is to go with just one and then get another when my little girl is around 6-9 months old. Have many of you reading this raised two at the same time and if so what would you suggest? Thanks :confused:
Only you can decide. Are you an experienced Shepherd owner? Do you have the financial resources two raise two, do you have the time for two? If so then go for it. If not forget it.
 

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Go with your gut.
 

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.My gut feeling is to go with just one and then get another when my little girl is around 6-9 months old. Have many of you reading this raised two at the same time and if so what would you suggest? Thanks :confused:
I haven't raised two at a time myself, but I have dealt with the after effect of two puppies in the same home with foster dogs. I have come to the conclusion that 95% of average pet owners just can't do it.

It takes a lot of effort to raise a puppy. When you have two puppies the work is exponentially harder. It is more than just twice the work I think.

Follow your gut instinct and wait. Spend two or three years making the one puppy the best dog ever. Train and socialize and then train some more. And then bring another puppy in.
Sheilah
 

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If you are a novice to the breed or new to dog ownership, I suggest you raise one pup properly at a time. When one pup hits the 2+ year old mark, consider another. There will always be nice puppies - make sure it is the right fit for both you and the pup.
 

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Speaking from having 2 different breeds as pups (I can only imagine 2 GSP at same time), though I am totally crazy about my dogs, I wouldn't do it again. Double everything - food, vet, supplies, training. Then think about if one of them have issues, either health or behavior, you have that to deal with on top of the everyday stuff. Haven't hit this part yet, but eventually will and am so dreading it. As they age, the possible problems that will come up at that time.
 

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That's what would scare me...just the original 3 rounds of shots are about $400 in my area. Twice that...$800?!?!?

It will be very difficult to raise 2 unless you have someone else in the household that will be the primary caretaker of one of them. You have to train separately, keep them separated so they don't bond too much with each other, and all that takes twice the time that one dog takes.

We have a member at our club that has litter mates. He brought them in when they were about 9 months old. The male...could not handle being away from the female. Even across the room was bad for him. He would whine and whine like no tomorrow. And I'm not talking about a little drive leaking, I'm talking loud, obnoxious, yelping noises. He couldn't concentrate on anything if they weren't together.
 

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Personally I wouldn't do it unless there is two people in the house that are willing to each take a dog. It's like having twin babies rather then just one, it's double the work while they're puppies and also double the work when they're senior dogs.
 

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I definately wouldn't do two puppies together...heck...you probably couldn't pay me to do it. It's so much work with one, especially if puppy raising isn't going smoothly. I agree with everyone else. Get some serious training under your belt with the first one, then after she's about a year, year and a half old, then start looking for your next one.
 

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I agree with what martemchik said. I have seen it many times when people get two pups at the same time. The pups bond so strongly with each other they get separation anxiety when they are apart. It is also hard to train two pups at the same time. Imagine the time it takes to train one properly alone without the distraction of a second pup, then triple that time if you have two. I would get just one, train it the best possible amount, and once that one is at least two and your daughter is older get a second one if you still want to. Having two puppies and a young child would be a real hand full. In the end you have to go with your gut. Good luck in your choices. I know it's hard to turn down a cute puppy.
 

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I have to second what sit,stay said. I have fostered pups that came from a home with 2 pups. People seem to be overwhelmed by that many pups.
 

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Yes, it would be a mistake to raise two puppies at the same time.

It can be done successfully, but it is three times as much work to do it properly. You have to treat them as two separate individuals and not as a unit. That means you must walk, train, and play with each one separately. They can be allowed to play together about an hour a day, but any more than that and they will tend to over-bond to each other instead of bonding to you. This makes them very difficult to train and control, as their brains are wired to other dogs first and humans are perceived as merely secondary. While this might not be an issue with a pair of Toy Poodles, a pair of untrained, uncontrollable GSDs can be a huge liability.

What's more, littermate siblings will tend to fight as they mature, especially if they are the same sex.

The problems that arise from raising two puppies together are so ubiquitous there is a term for it: "Littermate Syndrome".

Raise one puppy at a time, and don't add a second until the first one is well trained, socialized, controllable, and bonded to you. Even then, don't allow the second pup to be raised by the older dog, as pup will tend to over-bond with the older dog instead of to you.

Think about it this way. Let's say things were turned the other way around, and humans were raised by dogs. If a dog family adopted you and another human at the same time, who would you be more likely to gravitate toward? The dogs, or the other human?
 

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They can be allowed to play together about an hour a day, but any more than that and they will tend to over-bond to each other instead of bonding to you.
Really?! Where does this number come from? I'm not buying that. I'll buy the three times as much work and expense... But I've raised two littler mates of the same sex and they bonded just fine to my family. We didn't limit them to an hour a day. :crazy: I've got two little lab puppies now. They are not from the same litter, but they are both under two years and they are also bonded just fine to us.
 

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Go with your gut. I think Freestep has explained it perfectly in regard to the bonding and amount of work involved.
 

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I would just rather put my "all" into one puppy vs trying to divide my time between two..

The one thing that sticks with me now, is having a couple close in age, they tend to die close in age as well, bad enough to lose one, but losing two sometimes just months apart is devastating..

So no, I'd go with one now, wait a couple years, add another:)
 

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I have two puppies. My girl just turned 11 months and my boy is only five months. Well during the winter (I live in NE) it wasn't fun potty training in the snow and cold. But think that was the worst
Part. YES it is tons of work...but if you are willing to put in the time, effort and patience it's great! My pups love running around playing together. Each of them come to me, I don't feel that they only want each other . In fact they love the individual attention that they get. Just make sure you are up for it. Having two puppies is so, so much more than one. Good luck!


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Really?! Where does this number come from? I'm not buying that. I'll buy the three times as much work and expense... But I've raised two littler mates of the same sex and they bonded just fine to my family. We didn't limit them to an hour a day. :crazy: I've got two little lab puppies now. They are not from the same litter, but they are both under two years and they are also bonded just fine to us.
I have friends who own littermates (cavalier kind charles spaniels). They are neighbors so the dogs see each other every day. These 2 boys are so bonded to each other that, when we go to an obedience trial, whichever dog isn't in the ring has to be removed from the room. Otherwise, they scream for each other.
And these dogs haven't lived in the same home since they left the breeder. I can only imagine how tightly they would have bonded.
 

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I have friends who own littermates (cavalier kind charles spaniels). They are neighbors so the dogs see each other every day. These 2 boys are so bonded to each other that, when we go to an obedience trial, whichever dog isn't in the ring has to be removed from the room. Otherwise, they scream for each other.
And these dogs haven't lived in the same home since they left the breeder. I can only imagine how tightly they would have bonded.
Just took Ivan for his 1 yr rabies shot. Left Wiggles at home. No crying, no whining, no destruction. They did just fine separately. Are they friends, yes, would they grieve if the other one died... probably Buddy did when his brother died, but life went on. I've never had a dog that screamed, but my friend has one. It acts this way every time she leaves the house. Funny it is so bonded to her it has the same problem. :eek: Thank goodness I have confident well adjusted dogs!
 

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Having just gotten out of puppyhood with my boy, I would have to advise a resounding "NO!".

I KNEW (or thought I did) exactly what I was getting into...but he made me absolutely crazy sometimes. To the point where I said I would never get a puppy again. Multiple times.

Good sense has since fled me, and I'm sure I'll end up getting another one in about 2 years. Three years seems like a good age gap...
 
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