German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,068 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My friend asked me for the name of my GSD's breeder a while back. I told her, because at that time she had no intention of getting a dog-I thought she was just asking for the sake of conversation. Now she tells me that she called the breeder and that my dogs mother is going to be giving birth again soon, and she is going to buy one of those puppies. The father I believe is the same one as my dogs as well. He is brought in from another state when they breed her twice a year.

I have been rather upset about this. I told her that my GSD was not an easy dog, that he was very challenging-hard headed, aggressive, but she knows all this. She says that the aggression, and his intimidating size are the reasons why she wants a dog from his breeder. She loves how my dog watches my house, and she wants that security. I told her there are other breeders but she wants his breeder.

I am worried for my friend, she has no GSD experience. I am worried about the dog, she may not be able to handle him-and where do you think he is going to end up? I will answer this, with us. I would not turn my back on one of my dogs siblings.Which will ruin my plans of waiting till my dogs are older and then carefully selecting our next dog from a reputable breeder.

Question, am I just supposing that since it is the same parents as my dog, that her dog will be the same? Can a sibling of my dog have a completely different disposition?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,725 Posts
I wonder if it would be a terribly awful thing to speak to your breeder about it... Perhaps you can let the breeder know that you don't feel like your friend understands the breed and what she is getting into with a GSD. I would have hoped that your breeder would have her own screening process that would eliminate people who are unlikely to be able to properly raise a GSD. That might be crossing a line though, doing that. Might not be completely ethical.

Maybe your friend will surprise you. Maybe she will rise to the challenge. And if she can't handle it, won't your breeder take the puppy back? I don't see why you would have to be the one to take him/her in if it doesn't work out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,068 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Leah, the breeder wouldn't care in the least if my friend could take care of the dog or not, and she would never take the puppy back. She doesn't do any screenings. The breeder does take the puppies to the vet, gets them their first set of shots, deworm, and clip the nails, and they are AKC registered. That is as far as she goes. She asked me absolutely nothing when I went to pick out my GSD. Thats right, she lets you pick them and gives no opinion whatsoever. That is how I ended up with the biggest puppy and the Alpha male. I had not idea what Alpha entailed at that time. I love my dog to peices but he is the most difficult dog ever in my opinion. I have never read a post not on this forum or any other dog forums that describes a dog quite like mine. He is an extremely challenging dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,725 Posts
Oh jeez, that's rough. I don't know what you can do then, it sounds like you don't have many options, other than really trying to talk your friend out of getting this puppy. :( I don't know a lot about siblings, as far as personalities go. I know there can be differences, but how much of that is nature or nurture, I couldn't say. With Rosa and her litter sibling Rocco, they are like the same dog in two different bodies (except Rosa is a bit calmer), but with Niko, I have heard that his litter sibling is not nearly as reactive as he is, and doesn't have any of the behavioral challenges we have faced with Niko. But how much of this is how the dogs were raised/trained? Impossible to say for certain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,602 Posts
Even in the same litter pups vary in personality, but if your friend isn't prepared now I guess the best you can do is educate her about the serious commitment she's about to make and if she's really up to it. I'd tell her that you are not prepared to take the pup off her hands if it doesn't work out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,206 Posts
Give your friend the link to this site and the numerous aggression threads....make sure she knows what she may be getting into. I would also try to support her in the foundation training if she does get a pup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,068 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Give your friend the link to this site and the numerous aggression threads....make sure she knows what she may be getting into. I would also try to support her in the foundation training if she does get a pup.
I gave her the link to this site last week. The thing is that she knows what my dog is like. I don't think that she realizes how difficult it is to continously train a dog like him, and his resistance to obeying. If we don't constantly keep him in training mode, he will quickly begin regressing.

She already asked me to come with her to choose the pup when it's born, and to show her some of the training techniques that we learned with Brutus. I failed to mention that she has 3 children and one of them is very young. I have done quite a bit of research in how to choose a puppy, so if she does decide to go through with it, I am going to go with her to choose the puppy. Although I wish that she would go with a different breeder. I sure hope that all the dogs aren't like mine.

Are males more stubborn than females? Perhaps I will suggest that she go with a female.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,068 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Even in the same litter pups vary in personality, but if your friend isn't prepared now I guess the best you can do is educate her about the serious commitment she's about to make and if she's really up to it. I'd tell her that you are not prepared to take the pup off her hands if it doesn't work out.
That is good news!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Let her dog sit or take your dog to training class with you or something? Maybe some kind of scared straight experience? :p Take her with you to get dog food so she can see how much it costs? Show her your vet bills?

And having her check out all of the aggression threads, 'help he won't stop biting', or my favorite to get myself all depressed: go on Craigslist and see how many people are giving away 8 month old dogs :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,068 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Let her dog sit or take your dog to training class with you or something? Maybe some kind of scared straight experience? :p Take her with you to get dog food so she can see how much it costs? Show her your vet bills?

And having her check out all of the aggression threads, 'help he won't stop biting', or my favorite to get myself all depressed: go on Craigslist and see how many people are giving away 8 month old dogs :(
Good ideas but she can't take my GSD, because he doesn't listen to anyone but me and my hubby, and can become aggressive. My lab is ways too easy of a dog and she'd then be convinced that getting a dog was great-but she wants it to be a GSD not a lab.

I like the scared straight idea, but I'd have to get her to sign a waver not to sue me if I let her take my GSD.:D

The food, vet, and accessories bill ought to scare her. Thanks for bringing that up-I am going go over that with her tomorrow. We are having dinner together. Main point being my GSD comes from a big GSD line, and big dog means that everything cost more. And I mean everything! I even have to buy 2 boxes of Heartguard for him. One for a dog weighing up to 100 lbs, and then an additional box to cover his 15 lbs over a hundred because they only make Heartguard up to 100 lbs. And dewormer even is costly because of his size. She doesn't have much money either. Maybe there is hope that I can convince her yet.

Anyhow, if she'd go to a different breeder even who could match her with the right dog. I just don't think my breeder is right for her. I don't want another dog from my dog's breeder. I have no plans on going back there for my next dog. I just hope that I am don't end up with the short end of this stick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
Personally, I would do my best not to be involved in this situation. I would let her pick the puppy, raise it, and let the dog be her headache. However, she might end up surprising everyone and do well with handling a GSD. At the most, I would do my best to fully explain the downside to having a GSD...especially one that has an aggressive potential. Best of luck!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,921 Posts
..........
Question, am I just supposing that since it is the same parents as my dog, that her dog will be the same? Can a sibling of my dog have a completely different disposition?

Absolutely possible.

In fact it is kind of probable that the other puppies may well have a very different temperament/personality. We got our male GSD from a local show kennel and had a chance to see one of his brothers and one sister as adults. Totally different dogs - the sister was a fairly excitable dog but also a little shy and reserved with strangers. His brother was VERY calm and also a bit reserved with strangers and new things. Baron is a total opposite - very very outgoing and very bold. Gunshots (on ScH field) and other new things are to be investigated not kept away from. Extremely curious dog about all new things. He was called "the most self confident dog that she has ever seen!" by the dog behaviorist they we consulted with about him as a teenager.

Very wide range of temperaments in a single litter - so you could ask the breeder for a calm puppy and probably have a good chance of having the breeder pick a more suitable dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,068 Posts
Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Absolutely possible.

In fact it is kind of probable that the other puppies may well have a very different temperament/personality. We got our male GSD from a local show kennel and had a chance to see one of his brothers and one sister as adults. Totally different dogs - the sister was a fairly excitable dog but also a little shy and reserved with strangers. His brother was VERY calm and also a bit reserved with strangers and new things. Baron is a total opposite - very very outgoing and very bold. Gunshots (on ScH field) and other new things are to be investigated not kept away from. Extremely curious dog about all new things. He was called "the most self confident dog that she has ever seen!" by the dog behaviorist they we consulted with about him as a teenager.

Very wide range of temperaments in a single litter - so you could ask the breeder for a calm puppy and probably have a good chance of having the breeder pick a more suitable dog.
Off topic but-I have tried everything that I can think of on the internet to try and find one of the owners of one of my dogs siblings. When I told the breeder about all the problems we were having with my dog, she said that none of her dogs have ever been aggressive before. I have often wondered if this was true. Is there anyway that I can go about finding the owner of one of my dogs litter mates? The breeder won't disclose this information, so I have been trying to find another way with no success.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,921 Posts
Off topic but-I have tried everything that I can think of on the internet to try and find one of the owners of one of my dogs siblings. When I told the breeder about all the problems we were having with my dog, she said that none of her dogs have ever been aggressive before. I have often wondered if this was true. Is there anyway that I can go about finding the owner of one of my dogs litter mates? The breeder won't disclose this information, so I have been trying to find another way with no success.

Does your breeder have and use a kennel name? if not, then it would be very difficult to find any of them, I suspect.

how about shows - does your breeder show dogs in any venue? if so you could track the show results and maybe even go to the shows (or at least look at the results) and see if you can track down any of the owners that way as well. Owners and breeders are usually listed in the show catalog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,068 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Does your breeder have and use a kennel name? if not, then it would be very difficult to find any of them, I suspect.

how about shows - does your breeder show dogs in any venue? if so you could track the show results and maybe even go to the shows (or at least look at the results) and see if you can track down any of the owners that way as well. Owners and breeders are usually listed in the show catalog.
She doesn't do shows (her GSD's aren't show line) and she doesn't have a kennel name either. When I see people with a GSD in my area, I ask them who the breeder was, but no luck finding a sibling so far.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,921 Posts
How about an ad in the local paper classifieds? Any local dog clubs (obed. or other types) - might run across someone who knows of some of her puppies maybe?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,135 Posts
For those saying she might rise up to the challenge, I highly doubt it. People who intently research GSDs seem to have a difficult time when they get to their butthole teenage phase, several of which have considered rehoming the pup.
For someone not at all prepared? I find it hard to believe that the commitment will remain.

I'm not really sure what to add, other than what others have stated. Showing the financial expenses seems like a pretty good idea. Also, if your boy is as 'aggressive' (I put that in quotes, because you seem to keep him under control) as you say, chances are, a sibling might exhibit similar behaviors. Maybe tell her what could happen if her dog bites someone. Huge raise in homeowner's insurance (if they don't drop her), lawyer bills, hospital bills, having to euthanize the dog, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,068 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
How about an ad in the local paper classifieds? Any local dog clubs (obed. or other types) - might run across someone who knows of some of her puppies maybe?
Excellent idea, I don't know why it's so important for me to know-but it is. I will see about trying one of the methods that you suggested.

For those saying she might rise up to the challenge, I highly doubt it. People who intently research GSDs seem to have a difficult time when they get to their butthole teenage phase, several of which have considered rehoming the pup.
For someone not at all prepared? I find it hard to believe that the commitment will remain.

I'm not really sure what to add, other than what others have stated. Showing the financial expenses seems like a pretty good idea. Also, if your boy is as 'aggressive' (I put that in quotes, because you seem to keep him under control) as you say, chances are, a sibling might exhibit similar behaviors. Maybe tell her what could happen if her dog bites someone. Huge raise in homeowner's insurance (if they don't drop her), lawyer bills, hospital bills, having to euthanize the dog, etc.
Oh, we keep him under control but it's not easy. We can't have many people over, when they do visit we have to be very careful with him. If we separate him from us he screams-literally and will not stop so obviously a visit can't take place with him screaming from downstairs. It's insanity! We have successfully trained him not to bolt out of the house, he is either in the house, behind our 6 foot fence, or on the leash with us walking him. Adults only walk him, never the kids. NILIF and (I know it's not popular here) but we trained him with C.Milan's pack leader training. Our dog requires on-going training, but he is under control, for the most part.

I know that my friend just rehomed 2 other pets (cats) that she had, and never even bothered to mention it until I asked about their whereabouts. I don't see her providing a forever home for this dog, I really don't. That is why I do think I should accompany her to pick the dog, to make sure that I have input on which one she chooses, in case I end up with him/her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,135 Posts
I know that my friend just rehomed 2 other pets (cats) that she had
If she can't keep a commitment to something as low maintenance as a cat, I can't see someone like that keeping up with a GSD, especially if it's anything like yours. You are obviously very committed to your dog, and I'm sure it can be a hassle sometimes, but you seem more than willing to do it for him. Most people aren't willing to make that sort of commitment, so I don't see her sticking with such a dog.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top