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I've been wanting a GSD for some time and after plenty of research I found two breeders. Both breeders have good reputation and backgrounds the only difference in these two dogs would be one is short stock coat and one is long (i prefer long).

My problem is that the short stock coat is ready for home in June which means plenty of 1 on 1 time while working from home during covid which will be great for the puppy. The long stock coat which I prefer isn't ready for home until September at which point I may be back to work (Mon-Friday, 8-4). Above all else I just want my dog to be happy and have a good temperament and training. Is this attainable with the September dog if I'm back to work? Would the 3+ months working from home with the dog be a worlds difference in temperament and training? I would prefer the long coat but not at the expense of a good mannered dog.

I guess I'm looking for anyone with experience spending all day everyday with their dog for extended periods versus someone only able to come home for one hour during lunch on a normal workday (I do have friends lined up who can take her out during the days for walks and plan on using a doggy daycare 2-3 times per week as well as a morning walk/jog).
 

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I was wondering if all the time you would spend with a puppy during stay-at-home will lead to separation problems when you go back to work? Have you read about the land-shark, if not search it here. Make sure you, your friends, and the doggy day care are ready for that.
 

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I was wondering if all the time you would spend with a puppy during stay-at-home will lead to separation problems when you go back to work? Have you read about the land-shark, if not search it here. Make sure you, your friends, and the doggy day care are ready for that.
Thanks and good point i'll do some research about that term. It has crossed my mind and my only logical solution was that I will need to gradually leave the dog unattended for longer periods, say in a her crate (if i go the crate route) or in a spare room for an hour at first then two, three and so on to get her used to the separation. Thanks for the input
 

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Of the five dogs I've gotten as puppies, I was working for three of them - the first one and the last one, I've been pretty much home. The others, I would take a week or so off and manage to come home for lunch for a couple more weeks.
The dogs I was home with did not develop seperation anxiety when I went back to school/work/whatever it was that had me routinely out of the house. The dogs whose puppyhood had me working did just fine.


Puppies will give you grief - you don't need to look for it ;)
 

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Of the five dogs I've gotten as puppies, I was working for three of them - the first one and the last one, I've been pretty much home. The others, I would take a week or so off and manage to come home for lunch for a couple more weeks.
The dogs I was home with did not develop seperation anxiety when I went back to school/work/whatever it was that had me routinely out of the house. The dogs whose puppyhood had me working did just fine.


Puppies will give you grief - you don't need to look for it ;)
Five dogs.. where do you find the time! Haha thanks for the reassurance and input!
 

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I've been wanting a GSD for some time and after plenty of research I found two breeders. Both breeders have good reputation and backgrounds the only difference in these two dogs would be one is short stock coat and one is long (i prefer long).

My problem is that the short stock coat is ready for home in June which means plenty of 1 on 1 time while working from home during covid which will be great for the puppy. The long stock coat which I prefer isn't ready for home until September at which point I may be back to work (Mon-Friday, 8-4). Above all else I just want my dog to be happy and have a good temperament and training. Is this attainable with the September dog if I'm back to work? Would the 3+ months working from home with the dog be a worlds difference in temperament and training? I would prefer the long coat but not at the expense of a good mannered dog.

I guess I'm looking for anyone with experience spending all day everyday with their dog for extended periods versus someone only able to come home for one hour during lunch on a normal workday (I do have friends lined up who can take her out during the days for walks and plan on using a doggy daycare 2-3 times per week as well as a morning walk/jog).
Nothing you do with your puppy will change its temperament. Training will help shape the dog, but temperament is what it is!

That's why you should meet and interact/view the puppy's parents!
 

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Nothing you do with your puppy will change its temperament. Training will help shape the dog, but temperament is what it is!

That's why you should meet and interact/view the puppy's parents!
I own the Sire, no temperament issues in these lines. Separation anxiety will definitely not be an issue.
What I can tell you about when I brought Gus home from Carmen’s, I had booked two weeks off. That two weeks off was immediately cancelled after telling Carmen. She said “absolutely not, this puppy needs to get used to the normal environment of your house!”
I would recommend you start leaving your girl a few times a day so she has alone time and learns to settle on her own. Either way, I know she will adapt quickly.
Enjoy her and have fun, stop worrying about the “what if’s” down the road.

Both Sheena, Carmen and I will support you all the way, just a phone call away. Since I was away when pups were picked up, you’re welcome to come visit Gus anytime you like.

Cathy
 

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Hi

So exciting your getting a pup. I have limited experience, but I got my pup in May and had a month of working from home before I had to go back to work properly. In my opinion it made the process so much better. we bonded very well. it great for toilet training. I took the never let her potty in the house approach, meaning up several times a night to let her out. and being home in the day meant I could let her out every hour or so. I think you will find the early stages of training easier if you are with her more. I was going to work the odd time for a couple of hours so she was used to being alone. I also come home for lunch. I think it's essential that someone let's your pup out and feeds them if you are not able to take a lunch break home. I see you have already planned for that. personally I crate in the morning (snoozy anyway) and after lunch I leave her in the hall with a food puzzle or safe chew. do not underestimate a pups ability to destroy and find danger in the house 😥😥

either way, commitment makes whatever you choose work. good luck with the pup, an post some pictures!
 

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I got Juno in February and I am working from home for the next 2 years. So I am with her all day every day, which is why I got the puppy in the first place, because I had time to train her.

That being said, I think that the fact that I was home made for very unstructured training (she is my first puppy; and I am a bit clueless), which meant that she did not learn as quickly as she could have. She was also the runt, so maybe that slowed her down.

I remember one day, when she had peed in the house for 30th time, I wondered if she would be further along in her training if I had to go to work each day. Then we would have more of a routine, and she would be clearer in my expectations of her. We went through a really annoying phase when I would take her potty, and she wouldn't go. I would step into the house and she would pee. Also, every time it snowed, she was so distracted, she would forget that she was supposed to pee.

As for her separation anxiety, because of the lockdown, someone is always home with her. When I am out, I crate her, but other people are still around. She is 7 months old, and I do not leave her free in the house, because (1) she could destroy something and (2) I have a reactive hound, who does not like it when she gets in his face (which she does when she wants to play). Also, I only leave for about 4 hours at time max.

She has separation anxiety, but it's not awful where she barks and howls the whole time. I am told she whimpers and then goes quiet, then whimpers again until she falls asleep.
 

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I got Juno in February and I am working from home for the next 2 years. So I am with her all day every day, which is why I got the puppy in the first place, because I had time to train her.

That being said, I think that the fact that I was home made for very unstructured training (she is my first puppy; and I am a bit clueless), which meant that she did not learn as quickly as she could have. She was also the runt, so maybe that slowed her down.

I remember one day, when she had peed in the house for 30th time, I wondered if she would be further along in her training if I had to go to work each day. Then we would have more of a routine, and she would be clearer in my expectations of her. We went through a really annoying phase when I would take her potty, and she wouldn't go. I would step into the house and she would pee. Also, every time it snowed, she was so distracted, she would forget that she was supposed to pee.

As for her separation anxiety, because of the lockdown, someone is always home with her. When I am out, I crate her, but other people are still around. She is 7 months old, and I do not leave her free in the house, because (1) she could destroy something and (2) I have a reactive hound, who does not like it when she gets in his face (which she does when she wants to play). Also, I only leave for about 4 hours at time max.

She has separation anxiety, but it's not awful where she barks and howls the whole time. I am told she whimpers and then goes quiet, then whimpers again until she falls asleep.
what you are describing is not my idea of separation anxiety.
 

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As y
I got Juno in February and I am working from home for the next 2 years. So I am with her all day every day, which is why I got the puppy in the first place, because I had time to train her.

That being said, I think that the fact that I was home made for very unstructured training (she is my first puppy; and I am a bit clueless), which meant that she did not learn as quickly as she could have. She was also the runt, so maybe that slowed her down.

I remember one day, when she had peed in the house for 30th time, I wondered if she would be further along in her training if I had to go to work each day. Then we would have more of a routine, and she would be clearer in my expectations of her. We went through a really annoying phase when I would take her potty, and she wouldn't go. I would step into the house and she would pee. Also, every time it snowed, she was so distracted, she would forget that she was supposed to pee.

As for her separation anxiety, because of the lockdown, someone is always home with her. When I am out, I crate her, but other people are still around. She is 7 months old, and I do not leave her free in the house, because (1) she could destroy something and (2) I have a reactive hound, who does not like it when she gets in his face (which she does when she wants to play). Also, I only leave for about 4 hours at time max.

She has separation anxiety, but it's not awful where she barks and howls the whole time. I am told she whimpers and then goes quiet, then whimpers again until she falls asleep.
As you might know, I have a 7 month old too and an older (6 year) GSD in the house so I know your position somewhat.

A pup can be 99% house trained within a week but it takes incredible vigilance and dedication to house training them.

A/ the pup is NEVER out f your sight unless you are actively engaged with it, playing training or watching. If it falls asleep beside you, you take ti to the crate. Period.If you think it looks too peaceful or cute or you feel bad.... you are part of the problem.

B/ After a pup wakes up, plays for awhile or eats/drinks, out you go for a bathroom break. If you forget, if it's too much work, you're part of the problem.

C/ If you argue that it's too cold or too wet or too early or too late or you decide that your pup doesn't like the weather, you're part of the problem.

D/ Out with seconds of getting up for the day, seconds of getting out of the crate and if you're sure they have to go, you stay until they go even if it takes forever. No playing no toys just waiting to pee. Then pure joy excitement praise when they do the deed and then not directly back inside again. This can have the opposite effect for a smart dog who delays pottying because they like being outside. Even when I walk my older dogs late at night, I go another 50 yards after they potty for this reason. If he hasn't gone #2 yet n a last walk (and may not have to) he often goes right away when you turn around because he knows that's his last chance. Dogs are smart

Even if you catch a pup mid stream peeing inside the house and march it outside and it doesn't go after waiting and waiting, occasionally they go again once in the house. Very frustrating but guess what, it's your faulto_O

Take them out more often than they can possible go, make them have success not accidents. Even young pups can go 8 hours overnight without accidents. All my pups were 100% house trained by 10 weeks and only two accidents with the last one and one of those was the day he came home, the minute he got in the house. My fault!
 
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