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No sound. But one piece of advice. When doing "stay" don't call him out of the stay to you for the reward. Reward him in position. It's confusing to the dog. Walk back in to him and reward, then release him from the command.

Also, just a side note. Take him out to potty, then put him up for a few minutes then bring him out again to work. Separate out the two. He was disengaged for the beginning.
 

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He had just gone out to potty; he will always urinate/mark given the chance.

Weird, I could hear sound. Just recently uploaded it so maybe that has something to do with it?

I've actually heard the opposite. I've been told to reward him so that he has to get out of position to be rewarded, so that he learns that the click means "you're free to get up now". If I'm not going to release him but I am going to reward him, I say "good" and reward him in position. The click is his release marker, and "good" is his duration marker.
 

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One thing I'd try Tulip, is to keep his attention from beginning to end. Not let him wander between commands and exercises like that even if it means the session is shorter. Cue him its time to start and tell him he's done. I'd probably just forget about the leash for what you're doing too, its just in your way and you aren't really using it for anything. Take it off or just drop it if you think he may wander off just so you can get ahold of it and not let him go.
 

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Well I'm not going to give an assessment per say. But I will say if the click treats and rewards thing is confusing you?? What do you think it's doing for your dog???
 

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Have you ever tried rewarding him with a quick game of tug, instead of food? He seems kind of bored and I think that is why he tends to want to wander off if he isn't leashed. He likes the treats and is happy to eat them, but he just doesn't seem to be excited to train. My dog is like yours-more than happy to scarf down the food reward, but then back to sniffing the ground and ignoring me until I give another command. Sometimes you gotta switch things up a little if you aren't getting what you want out of a training session. You could use a toy he really loves, but only use it for training-no other chewing on it or playing with it outside of training.
My dog seems to enjoy obedience a lot more with play mixed in. I am able to hold his attention the whole time, because he is anticipating that tug reward!
If he doesn't like to tug or fetch, then maybe a different treat that he really loves and only gets when doing obedience.
I also notice you repeating commands. You are inadvertently teaching him to ignore you. There are no consequences for not doing the command immediately, so he just doesn't listen until you say it 2-3 times. Do you ever give him any type of correction for blowing you off?
 

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To make a suggestion. You look boring. With no sound, I noticed there is no enthusiasm. Be interesting. He's just haphazardly sitting.
Butt hits the ground, you two should be facing each other. Treat in hand, bring it up so his eyes are with yours. Celebrate him just sitting. Then work to stepping away. Sit, treat. If he gets up. No treat. Start over.
Just trying to help. Good luck.
Suggest looking into engagement.
 

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Yeah I have to have him on a leash or he won't stay by me or listen to me. I'd like to keep his attention from beginning to end, but I don't know how to.
Generally a little more animation and movement. Working at a little faster pace and asking for attention by encouraging him to come forward to you. Have a cue to start and a word to end on, and even if its only one sit, look for it to be a good, enthusiastic one sit. What was you're general plan with him, to get where you are now?

He obeys you, even without much focus, so you're doing some things well. I just wonder if maybe you've mixed a few different techniques or ideas and should narrow it down to get what you want?
 

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Tulip, I like how you have him trained to verbal commands and not just body language. I also noticed he appears to know how to count. It appeared to average he sat or downed on the third command.


You've done a very nice job on teaching him to stay. But for this exercise you reward him for the staying which means he gets it for staying, not for getting up and going to you. Because that's what you're rewarding him for, for getting up and gong to you. Use a word to release him from the stay. You can use 'okay' or 'free' or whatever you want. Generally when I teach stay they don't leave it at all until I give the free command. If I'm going to have them do something else, like come to me, stand or sit from the same position, then I teach them a wait command. Wait tells them I am going to expect them to do something. Stay means don't move until I release them. Two similar commands with different outcomes. Wait would also be when I open the car door. They are to wait there until I give them the command to get out. Stay means they aren't leaving the car or the spot where they are in it.


I can see you've put a lot of work into him, which is great and puts you ahead of lots of people. But he has no real engagement with you. This is where and why you are having the biggest problems. By this point in time he should be looking at you to check in on where you are and if you want him to do something. Instead he is looking at everything else. In the yard you are not important to him yet, not more important than what else is out there, which is not much. You need to make yourself more important.


Personally, I would stop the training and start playing with him. You stated in a different post that he is attached with a leash to you in the house. It looks like his yard time is also leashed to you if you're training. Get rid of the leash. Put a crate in the livingroom, or wherever you spend most of your time. He doesn't need to be with you all the time. He needs to start learning fun means being with you. Boring is in the crate, fun is time with you. He can watch tv from the crate. He can chew on a toy. Once an hour or whatever time you have, take a toy and take him outside, off leash, and play. Throw it, play tug. Walk away from him and soon he'll be following. Use two toys for fun and fetch. If he runs away with one, take out the second one and when he's looking throw that one and go get the first one. He's totally bored with training and it looks like that is the time he spends with you both inside and outside. Time to turn that around and become the fun person he wants to be with.
 

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What kind of relationship do you have with him outside of training? Does he get engaged for any activity, say playing fetch, or playing tracking games, nosework, maybe he gets super excited for better treats?

I see all that sniffing around in the back yard as an avoidance tactic. He isn't unhappy but he's really not interested.

The key to training is to get the dog engaged with you. Work on that, and then go back to teaching commands. He's very flat in the work, which can be normal in certain breeds, but for a GSD there should be much more engagement.

Just for some inspiration on engagement:
 

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Another video for inspiration that I really enjoyed watching is Bridget Carlsen training her Belgian Malinois pup. Go to YouTube and find Bridget Carlsen. Then find "Moolah Ot Vitosha 4 Months Old".
There's a little silliness at first where she's trying to get Moolah to wear a Christmas hat, but after that watch her train Moolah and how much enthusiasm and engagement there is between the two! They both look like they are having fun. The pup hardly takes her eyes off of Bridget, even when a person with another dog walks in. Moolah looks over for a second and right back to Bridget because Bridget is fun. She is using marker training, just not using a clicker and is using food for a reward.

I like all of her videos that I've watched so far, but this one is my favorite. :)
 

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Ok. So couldn't tell you were clicking. No sound. But stil my advice is the same. The "click" just tells him he is right. But it should not be used as a release from the command. I would "click" then step in to reward. Then if you want release him.

I agree, you are boring. LOL. Sorry no polite way to say that. Move a bit. Have fun, make him focus on you by moving quick, ask him to do commands, quick, move on, keep things interesting. He is getting time to get distracted.

Keep your sessions short. Get his attention right away, don't let him to the end of the leash, keep moving ask for a command. Don't give him time to decide to mark.

It really looks like you are doing a good job. He looks like a lovely happy pup. Great job!!
 

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Thank you all for the helpful responses!!

Well I'm not going to give an assessment per say. But I will say if the click treats and rewards thing is confusing you?? What do you think it's doing for your dog???
The clicker method isn't confusing to me... I was just asking for critique in general so as to better myself as a trainer. My dream is to be a professional dog trainer, and so I'm always looking for more advice and opinions.

Have you ever tried rewarding him with a quick game of tug, instead of food? He seems kind of bored and I think that is why he tends to want to wander off if he isn't leashed. He likes the treats and is happy to eat them, but he just doesn't seem to be excited to train. My dog is like yours-more than happy to scarf down the food reward, but then back to sniffing the ground and ignoring me until I give another command. Sometimes you gotta switch things up a little if you aren't getting what you want out of a training session. You could use a toy he really loves, but only use it for training-no other chewing on it or playing with it outside of training.
My dog seems to enjoy obedience a lot more with play mixed in. I am able to hold his attention the whole time, because he is anticipating that tug reward!
If he doesn't like to tug or fetch, then maybe a different treat that he really loves and only gets when doing obedience.
I also notice you repeating commands. You are inadvertently teaching him to ignore you. There are no consequences for not doing the command immediately, so he just doesn't listen until you say it 2-3 times. Do you ever give him any type of correction for blowing you off?
I used to try using a toy as a reward instead, but his "out" isn't 100% yet. I've been told/I've read that I shouldn't be using a toy as a reward until I know he always take it from me and always drop it when I ask him to. He'll usually play tug, but not fetch. Should I focus more on solidifying his "out" so I can use tug as a reward instead of food? I definitely need to get him some better treats as well as maybe withholding two meals instead of just one. Food is just so much easier to reward with, although I would like to be able to use the toy as well. When I first started training him, I didn't correct him. When I used to take him to Man's Best Friend training classes, we always corrected every time he didn't respond to the first command. Later on I started reading the articles on the leerburg website (which is what I now base my training off of), which said to only correct when the dog knows the command and is consciously disobeying you, so I stopped correcting so often. The article said to use a word like "nope" (as in "nope, try again") if they don't obey because they either don't know the command fully yet or if they're in too distracting of an environment. Do you think he is at the point where I should be correcting him for not obeying the first time I command him?

To make a suggestion. You look boring. With no sound, I noticed there is no enthusiasm. Be interesting. He's just haphazardly sitting.
Butt hits the ground, you two should be facing each other. Treat in hand, bring it up so his eyes are with yours. Celebrate him just sitting. Then work to stepping away. Sit, treat. If he gets up. No treat. Start over.
Just trying to help. Good luck.
Suggest looking into engagement.
Thanks for the advice! I have looked into engagement. It's just so difficult to engage him. He'd rather chase bugs (as you can see at one point in the video, lol).

Generally a little more animation and movement. Working at a little faster pace and asking for attention by encouraging him to come forward to you. Have a cue to start and a word to end on, and even if its only one sit, look for it to be a good, enthusiastic one sit. What was you're general plan with him, to get where you are now?

He obeys you, even without much focus, so you're doing some things well. I just wonder if maybe you've mixed a few different techniques or ideas and should narrow it down to get what you want?
Thanks for the advice! I have used multiples methods trying to figure out what works best for him. I've never had a dog so difficult to engage. At this point, I would like to continue on with and use leerburg's methods. I would like to get him his CGC, and maybe his BH if possible. Right now I'm just training him for the CGC.

Tulip, I like how you have him trained to verbal commands and not just body language. I also noticed he appears to know how to count. It appeared to average he sat or downed on the third command.


You've done a very nice job on teaching him to stay. But for this exercise you reward him for the staying which means he gets it for staying, not for getting up and going to you. Because that's what you're rewarding him for, for getting up and gong to you. Use a word to release him from the stay. You can use 'okay' or 'free' or whatever you want. Generally when I teach stay they don't leave it at all until I give the free command. If I'm going to have them do something else, like come to me, stand or sit from the same position, then I teach them a wait command. Wait tells them I am going to expect them to do something. Stay means don't move until I release them. Two similar commands with different outcomes. Wait would also be when I open the car door. They are to wait there until I give them the command to get out. Stay means they aren't leaving the car or the spot where they are in it.


I can see you've put a lot of work into him, which is great and puts you ahead of lots of people. But he has no real engagement with you. This is where and why you are having the biggest problems. By this point in time he should be looking at you to check in on where you are and if you want him to do something. Instead he is looking at everything else. In the yard you are not important to him yet, not more important than what else is out there, which is not much. You need to make yourself more important.


Personally, I would stop the training and start playing with him. You stated in a different post that he is attached with a leash to you in the house. It looks like his yard time is also leashed to you if you're training. Get rid of the leash. Put a crate in the livingroom, or wherever you spend most of your time. He doesn't need to be with you all the time. He needs to start learning fun means being with you. Boring is in the crate, fun is time with you. He can watch tv from the crate. He can chew on a toy. Once an hour or whatever time you have, take a toy and take him outside, off leash, and play. Throw it, play tug. Walk away from him and soon he'll be following. Use two toys for fun and fetch. If he runs away with one, take out the second one and when he's looking throw that one and go get the first one. He's totally bored with training and it looks like that is the time he spends with you both inside and outside. Time to turn that around and become the fun person he wants to be with.
Thanks! Yeah, I worked to make sure he would follow my verbal commands. Lol, I honestly never noticed this before, so thank you guys for pointing this out to me!!

I use the click as my free command. "Good" is the word I use for "you're doing good, but stay where you are", and the click means "you did what I wanted, you're free to get up now". I didn't use "good" at all in this video and I honestly don't use it very often. Should I be using it more? I use the same distinction between wait and stay. If I tell him to sit or down, I expect him to stay in that position until I release him. If I tell him wait, he can do whatever he wants as long as he doesn't touch the door frame until I release him.

Yes, I do have the leash on him while in the house and while training, but usually when he's out in the backyard the leash is off. I only put it on for training. Thanks for the advice :).

What kind of relationship do you have with him outside of training? Does he get engaged for any activity, say playing fetch, or playing tracking games, nosework, maybe he gets super excited for better treats?

I see all that sniffing around in the back yard as an avoidance tactic. He isn't unhappy but he's really not interested.

The key to training is to get the dog engaged with you. Work on that, and then go back to teaching commands. He's very flat in the work, which can be normal in certain breeds, but for a GSD there should be much more engagement.
I haven't really found anything that gets him really engaged, except for bugs, lol. If only I could leash and train a fly, then I'd always have his attention! Lol. I probably just need to try withholding two meals instead of just one, as well as finding some tastier treats. Yeah, it's weird. I've trained a yorkie, a lab, and a maltese, and they all were much more engaged with me and looked like those gsds you see in videos online, and now that I have a gsd he's the opposite.

Again, thank you everyone for your advice and I will be trying some things out and posting another video at some point :)
 

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You've received some good advice.....and I can personally tell you ...some of the advice regarding you being much more animated and capturing the dog's attention will make a huge difference...it would be a great place to start. I used to get hammered on by the trainers at basic obedience classes....they all thought I was way too mellow and uptight at the same time to ever captivate my dog's attention. I remember them telling me to act like I just won the lottery during basic recall training amongst other basic skills....to put some life into the process...so I tried...and thought I did....I believe one of the instructors looked at me and said " Hmmmm $5 jackpot?" Anyway....I gave in and acted the part they asked for...even though my new excitement level was mostly sarcasm because I am pretty laid back... however it elevated the "mood" and made a marked difference. Eventually....my sarcastic "excitement" became genuine and my neighbors probably hate me for it...but it worked.

I also like the clear beginning and ending advice you were also given....I employed this advice as well... it works.

Dog nails a good one and it needs to be instantly conveyed to the dog....I have found my verbal marker is much more effective at sending this message versus a clicker.

Yeah, engagement......it's the name of the game.

Have some fun training the Kody monster....it'll get you there quicker.


SuperG
 

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Look into Michael Ellis power of food and power of tug videos. I'm renting them on bowwowflix.com his take on engagement is great and it's right on with what my trainer is teaching me. My dog now is super excited for a tug. He pushes it right back to me.
 

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Thanks for the advice! I have used multiples methods trying to figure out what works best for him. I've never had a dog so difficult to engage. At this point, I would like to continue on with and use leerburg's methods. I would like to get him his CGC, and maybe his BH if possible. Right now I'm just training him for the CGC.
What may be the problem with that Tulip, is that its left you a little out of order in some things and putting things together at the wrong time. In a broad, general picture, you're looking for a lot of control before you've got the strong desire.

If you watch some of those videos, they build the desire by the overall interaction of chasing the food and a lot of free movement with the luring. Its not dependent on with holding meals. Its a different desire then hunger, its play. That helps transition into toys for the ob too.

I don't know how you started him exactly, but going back and maybe revising how you do your luring wouldn't hurt, especially before you add more pressure with corrections and looking for absolutes on the commands. Build the focus through the playing and motivation first. Play with him a lot without combining the ob yet. Keep them separate for now.
 

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I think you need to use the clicker to reward the behavior and a word to release him. You're not always going to have a clicker with you. His obedience or listening to you is going to be at home and away from home.


If you seriously want to become a trainer than you need to have a system. To learn one you need to work under someone to learn it correctly. To learn all the nuances, to learn what to do when something doesn't work. The best way to do that is to work with someone who has already learned it, that can show you how, what to look at, what you're seeing in the dog's behavior.


Try a squeaky toy, I've rarely seen a dog that doesn't love a toy that squeaks. Try one of the toys where there's an empty bottle in it. They usually love the noise it makes.


Sometimes when working in the house I'll throw Enya's treat down so she has to jump and catch it or scramble over, chase it to get it. She loves that and comes running back to do it again. Of course she has to sit or down or whatever I ask of her before it happens again. She has to be watching me to see when it'll happen, where it'll go. It's a game, a fun one she loves. And boy do I have her attention!
 
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