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Hi!

I have an option of adopting a retired police GSD. He is 7.

Now I am wondering if this wouldbe wise or not. So let me explain my situation...
I already have a 13 year old dog who is not a GSD but a Karst shepherd mix. I am thinking of getting another dog and am seriously considering a GSD as I want a more active dog who would enjoy long walks but that would protect me if necessary as I walk not only in the town but also in mountains. When I say protect I mean from weird people, not so much animals as apart from a few bears, wolves and pigs there are no dangerous animals where I live...

My intention was to get a puppy but on the other hand a puppy wouldn't be able to perform its protection duty for some time whereas a trained adult could...

But my dog lives with me in the house but has an almost constant acess to the fenced in yard. I would like the same for my future dog.
I am a bit unsure about how a former police dog would:

1.) get along with my dog. This is a must. My dog can be dominant and defensive, but will accept other dog on his teritorry if introduced in another territory first.

2.) house living? Would it be able to adapt to this?

3.) what about other animals (we have a cat)


I would like to be able to take the dog with me in town, on holidays...I don't mind if he/she would have to wear a muzzle in that situations. And I like nature walks.
it would be nice if I could take both dogs on short walks (as my old pal cannot go onlong walks anymore, but I still plan on going for short walks with him every day)

Ah, I lived with a GSD as a child but never had one as a grown up. I have experience with karst shepherd and sarplaninac which are both very protective breeds. I am opting for a GSD as they are more active, as I want an active dog. Sarplaninacsand Karst sepherds can be quite lazy :eek:
 

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No one can really answer your questions , the only person who can answer them is the person who has the dog.
 

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My department is authorized four active dog at any time. In the 18 years I've worked, I have seen many come and go. Now I'm not a dog handler so I'm no expert on the matter. I'd say in general most working dogs are poorly socialized when it comes to other animals. The ones from Europe don't see anything other than their kennel and bite trainer for the first year and a half.

Police dogs are trained to be very confident to the point their brains won't let them lose and they'll die trying. Which translates badly in a dog on dog fight. I've been told they do ok around female dogs but no males. It's too risky. And cats seem to be prey to them all. Never heard of a working dog that can leave a cat alone. I've seen a few police dogs take early medical retirements and had to be re-homed. Of them, only one has successfully been placed into a new home with other dogs. The others Went to homes without other pets. they all slowed down and found new jobs within the home, are good with school aged children. Not to discourage you from trying since all dogs are different but you are picking one that has been chosen for his proven prey drive and has been nothing but the alpha his whole life.


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Hi!
Its a 7 year old, Retired Police Dog. He's still going to be active at that age.
I'm not sure WE can answer the question for you.

Only you know what your handling skills are...If you think it'll be a good fit for you and your family (and can handle it), then go for it.

:) Kat
 

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go check out the dog. Police dogs are no different than every other type of dog. Some are hard to handle, some are a dream, some have DA, some have none etc.

Any dog with drive is different than your run of the mill house dog. I do not accept DA, but I still have to watch 2 of mine and they can't be left alone together. But we certainly can do everything together as well. Camping, running, biking, hanging out in the backyard etc. But I know what to watch for to stop anything before it starts.

A lot of the handlers I've worked with are required by their PD's to keep the dog kenneled when not working with scheduled "family" time to hang out too. Like mini vacations. Most of these handlers have families with young children and other dogs with no issues. They aren't all exactly the most dog savy people in the world yet they make it work just fine. They've been given the keys and taught how to handle to an extent, but a lot don't learn the in's and out's of what makes the dog actually tick without a lot of outside work on their own.

But go see the dog, it may or may not be a perfect fit. What passes as a police dog varies as much as what passes for a "good" german shepherd :) you won't know till you go see.
 

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I can't answer to whether the retired police dog or a puppy would be best for you. That said I think the more important question you should be asking yourself is how either would impact your senior dog. He has been your best friend and protector for 13 years (assuming you got him as a pup). He may get along with other dogs on the short term visits but bringing another dog into the home is a whole different situation.
you could suddenly see jealousy and aggressiveness from you senior dog. Or you could see depression and withdrawal. Old dogs are like old people, they can get very cranky with big changes.
Many here argue that to many of us humanize our dogs and say we shouldn't blah, blah, blah. But lets face it, after 13 years your senior dog has a deep bond with you and may not take kindly to you replacing him(in his eyes) or tormenting with have to deal with another dog in the house. Or it may all turn out fine and he could be ok with another dog, adult or puppy. But it is something else I think you should consider before you get either.

Best of luck to you.
 

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What kind of police dog is it? Bomb sniffer? Drug sniffer? Tracker? Or bite and hold the bad guy?

Why is it being retired? Hurt? Poor behavior? Handler retiring?

I would not bring my old neighbors bite dog into my house. He was too intense and not people or animal friendly. But an airport drug sniffer is probably a calm and socialized dog.
 

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Why is the handler not adopting this dog is my question? If the handler was killed or died...why is the family or some other police officer not adopting the dog?

just wanted to add--keep in mind no matter what type of dog this is, it's accustomed to WORKING...no walking and playing fetch, i mean really WORKING...can you satisfy that in this dog? Are you willing to get into that kind of activity? Maybe not IPO..but if it's a bomb dog can you get into tracking? DO the practice and trials? Keep this dog mentally happy?
 

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I guess it depends on the dog . U should ask the person who has the dog. When I was a kid my neighborhood friends dad was a k9 cop. They also had 2 toy poodles . The gsd stayed mostly in the back yard in a kennel but they would let it out when the other dogs were in the back.

They said to make sure hawks wouldn't pick up the poodles they let the gsd roam around in the yard with the poodles. Idk if that was true or not tho about the hawks lol. So I'm sure it was socialized


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Hi again!
I'm just curious ...why isn't his former handler taking/keeping him?
Our departments allow their retired K-9's to live with their "partners" or other
LEOs.

:) Kat
 

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If you want to skip the puppy stage and just get an adult German Shepherd that is already house broken and ready to move in; why not look at the various German Shepherd Rescues? There are a ton of great German Shepherds that need a home.

Other's have already pointed out the challenges with a K9. In that respect I would recommend going to meet the dog and asking a lot of questions. Go on more than one date before getting married too. If your initial visit goes well on the next visit bring your current dog so they can be introduced in neutral territory. That way you can see if they are going to get along. You mentioned having a cat, ask about that. Does this K9 enjoy cat sashimi?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thank you all for the replies!

Well it is an "all-rounder" police dog (sniffer AND attack dog) but is for sale as the handler can't take him (due to him living in a rented accomodation where no animals are allowed)...

Anyhow I have decided to wait a bit more and will most likely get a puppy/semi adult dog instead. My current dog is very protective and he is of a breed known for their agressivnes (guard dog,not watch dog), though he is well behaved :) I have experience with sarplaninacsand karst shepherds,so I dohave some experience with aggressive, protective dogs...

BUT I have never done any protection training with any dog (the breeds I mentioned earlier are naturally protective and dislike people on their territories) . But I would like to and that is also one of the reasons for deciding on a GSD. I would like totrain him/her for IPO.
 
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