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The German Shepherd, also known as GSD, is a breed that has been a staple in AKC events and shows, known worldwide as a robust, strong, intelligent working dog that is capable of many different jobs. He can be a show dog, a house pet, a police dog, war dog, bomb-searching dog, seeing-eye dog, or a search and rescue dog. He’s capable of anything you are willing to teach him how to do and this makes him one of the most all-around versatile dog breeds in the entire world.

There are two typical types of GSDs and people are clearly split on which is the better fo the two. One is the true German bloodline dog that has a straighter backline and is built more for working. The other dog is a show dog for the most part and considered more of an “Americanized” GSD. This is the dog bred for show.

There are variations of both that are bred by what might best be described as novice breeders. A less-than-kind description might be one you’ve heard referred to as ‘backyard breeders’ and these dogs are often not healthy in the long term.

If you are hoping to get yourself a great GSD, you should seek out a great breeder who has taken the time to research sires and bitches appropriately for the best possible breeding match, ensuring healthy puppies. A great breeder of champion dog lines will take care in finding good homes for their puppies, have a contract to ensure that you only breed your dog if they deem it a breeding worthy dog and that they will offer a guarantee of health. This takes you off the hook for genetic defects that can cost you thousands of dollars to treat.

An Excellent Breeder is Worth the Cost
When you seek a champion bred dog, you’ll pay more but as that old expression goes, “you pay for what you get” couldn’t be more true with this breed. Poor genetics in the GSD can lead you to a dog that has aggression issues, anxiety issues, or even joint problems.

A champion breeder will do the appropriate testing to ensure that their potential breeding pair are free of genetic defects that might be passed to a litter of puppies. They work very hard to ensure that those flaws aren’t passed because they are breeding champions, the best of the best.

Their dogs won’t be bred until they are 2-3 years of age as well. This ensures the female will be ready to carry a healthy litter of puppies and it also helps to rule out health conditions being passed down as some don’t show for 2-3 years.

When you go to a champion breeder, they’ll be able to give you a family tree history of your puppy, a pedigree that is traceable. You’ll know what issues, if any, that any of your puppies relatives ever had or currently have. It’s worth every extra penny that you pay for your puppy in the long run and well-worth your time t
 

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The German Shepherd, also known as GSD, is a breed that has been a staple in AKC events and shows, known worldwide as a robust, strong, intelligent working dog that is capable of many different jobs. He can be a show dog, a house pet, a police dog, war dog, bomb-searching dog, seeing-eye dog, or a search and rescue dog. He’s capable of anything you are willing to teach him how to do and this makes him one of the most all-around versatile dog breeds in the entire world.

There are two typical types of GSDs and people are clearly split on which is the better fo the two. One is the true German bloodline dog that has a straighter backline and is built more for working. The other dog is a show dog for the most part and considered more of an “Americanized” GSD. This is the dog bred for show.

There are variations of both that are bred by what might best be described as novice breeders. A less-than-kind description might be one you’ve heard referred to as ‘backyard breeders’ and these dogs are often not healthy in the long term.

If you are hoping to get yourself a great GSD, you should seek out a great breeder who has taken the time to research sires and bitches appropriately for the best possible breeding match, ensuring healthy puppies. A great breeder of champion dog lines will take care in finding good homes for their puppies, have a contract to ensure that you only breed your dog if they deem it a breeding worthy dog and that they will offer a guarantee of health. This takes you off the hook for genetic defects that can cost you thousands of dollars to treat.

An Excellent Breeder is Worth the Cost
When you seek a champion bred dog, you’ll pay more but as that old expression goes, “you pay for what you get” couldn’t be more true with this breed. Poor genetics in the GSD can lead you to a dog that has aggression issues, anxiety issues, or even joint problems.

A champion breeder will do the appropriate testing to ensure that their potential breeding pair are free of genetic defects that might be passed to a litter of puppies. They work very hard to ensure that those flaws aren’t passed because they are breeding champions, the best of the best.

Their dogs won’t be bred until they are 2-3 years of age as well. This ensures the female will be ready to carry a healthy litter of puppies and it also helps to rule out health conditions being passed down as some don’t show for 2-3 years.

When you go to a champion breeder, they’ll be able to give you a family tree history of your puppy, a pedigree that is traceable. You’ll know what issues, if any, that any of your puppies relatives ever had or currently have. It’s worth every extra penny that you pay for your puppy in the long run and well-worth your time t
I can't help but say almost every breeders' site where I saw a phrase anything like "champion bred lines" appeared to be a super sub par breeder. Most of them were referring to dogs several generations back- dogs they never met and had nothing to do with, that were show champions.

I have 2 dogs in my house right now whose parents were actually champions. My male GSD's dad was an OTcH and a conformation CH. Both excellent dogs in my opinion. Both websites list the accomplishments of their breeding dogs but don't say they are "champion lines" or "champion bred dogs"

Lastly, while I appreciate a beautiful animal as much as the next person, I was looking for performance titles of some kind besides conformation titles both times I recently bought dogs and both breeders were doing much more than just conformation. I think a dog should be tested in more ways than one.
 

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Yeah, breeders that show don’t put “champion lines” out there as a selling point. Instead they advertise a litter with the parents names with their titles.
 

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So this is really weird, but "sandraeric" also posted on the Husky forum about "Why Huskies are the Best Dogs to Have" and "Why Huskies Have Blue Eyes". it was in this same kind of format and language...bizarre.
 

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So this is really weird, but "sandraeric" also posted on the Husky forum about "Why Huskies are the Best Dogs to Have" and "Why Huskies Have Blue Eyes". it was in this same kind of format and language...bizarre.
Thank you!It's being checked on.
 

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Oh, I just took the time to thoughtfully reply to the other post lol Well, in any event whether it is spam, trolling..a new person may be searching for tips and recommendation and read these, so....duty to be honest and a good owner ambassador about the breed prevails.
 

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If you type in her name in a search engine you'll find that she joins forums and just posts information and not always about dogs.

Sent from my LYA-L09 using Tapatalk
 

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Yea, I found that she is a blogger and writer.
I don't think she has malicious purposes. :)

She does tend to write one long informative post and then be like, "Here you go! Read this!"
And once it's published online and the info is out there, she feels that her job is done. :)
 

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Yea, I found that she is a blogger and writer.
I don't think she has malicious purposes. :)

She does tend to write one long informative post and then be like, "Here you go! Read this!"
And once it's published online and the info is out there, she feels that her job is done. :)
Unusual but not malicious seems to be the case:)
 
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