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So my 3yr German Shepherd has been licking her butt/under leg area constantly since we got her!! It’s very red and bc she has been licking it she’s gotten a couple rashes, bleeding , and kinda black/red patches. She does it very passionately a lot and I’ll call her name and she doesn’t come cuz she’s in her butt. Then when she scratches her ears she moans and cries we’ve taken her to the vet for her ear and they gave us ear drops and said it was probably our rug so we gave her the ear drops and switched the rug to a nicer one and it did nothing. Why does she like her skin so much and why does she moan?
Thx:unsure:
 

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Did you just get her? My pup was very itchy for the first month or so after I got her. I think it was a nervousness thing.
 

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Sounds like allergies. Could be food or environmental.
Have you ever had a mosquito bite? Remember how itchy it was? She could be feeling a similar itch

What are you feeding her? Sometimes just a change to a higher quality food will help.
Is your lawn chemically treated or is your home treated with pesticides?
 

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I'm sorry to sound harsh but this has been going on for 3 years and your vet gave you some ear drops and said it was probably your rug. My opinion.... you need a new vet. Several things are likely to be going on. 1: possible systemic yeast infection either caused by environmental allergy, food allergy or both 2: On going staph infection of the skin with underlying cause the same as the yeast infection. 3: combination of the the two.
Either way I feel very bad for your dog to have been suffering like this for 3 years.

Try giving your dog a bath with Cholhexidine 4% shampoo. It's easy enough to find onlline. Be very careful no to get in the eyes.

I would get the opinion of a vet dermatologist. Have skin scrapings done to identify what is happening with the skin. Is it yeast/ bacterial or both. Surprised your regular vet didn't do this tbh. I would evaluate the diet. Some will disagree with me but GSD's seem to very prone to food sensitivity issues. It can't hurt to try an vet prescription hypoallergenic food for at least 3-4 months as well.

Caveat on my opinion of your vet. I'm assuming that you have been having regular vet visits of a least once or twice a year for wellness checks and your vet has seen these issues and you have discussed them. If that's not the case correct me.
 

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You probably have multiple things going on. Fixing dogs like this is complicated. It can get expensive. Most people end up saving money in the long run by going early to a vet derm if they have a general-practic vet who isn't good with skin issues. A vet derm appointment will cost around $150 for the basic exam (plus whatever diagnostics or meds are needed). You can find them at most state university vet school clinics, as well as in private practice.

One of my vet friends says that fixing these dogs is like peeling an onion. We work on layers of problems until we get to the source, but that may be a journey that takes several months! It's not a one-and-done kind of vet visit. OTOH, I've rescued some dogs with these kinds of problems that weren't dealt with appropriately, and the dogs ended up hairless eventually -- fur on the head, gray skin over the rest of the body, and a rat-like tail. They need half a year to get healthy. So it can get really bad!

If going to the vet derm is not in the cards for you because one isn't close enough, then you have to identify your layers of problems and work with your vet in resolving them, one by one.

1. Butt Licking

Is her anus red? If so, that's a classic sign of a true food allergy -- requiring an elimination diet, not dancing around with random food changes. We already have many threads about elimination diets. If you're going to the vet anyway, a bag of RX hydrolyzed protein kibble will add another $80+ to your vet visit, but it may help give you some more info (or order Diamond Care salmon hydrolyzed protein from Chewy at half the price, if money's tight), even if you want to eventually find something non-prescription that she can eat, you can go that path, but it requires a lot of diligence in sticking to the elimination diet over a period of many months. (One of my allergy dogs gets The Honest Kitchen Preference + Raw -- but it took us a while to figure out what worked for him on his elimination diet).

2. Skin

That description of black/red patches is VERY suspicious to me for staph. I've seen that on dogs before.

BEFORE starting a medicated shampoo protocol, first ask for a skin scrape by a good vet. They will look at the skin cells under a microscope in-house. That will tell you WHAT KIND of microbes are on the skin. That will go a long way to helping with treatment (it might even find some nasty mites embedded deep in the skin). A skin scrape is inexpensive (it might add $30 to your basic exam fee). At my vet, it's the first step.

Skin infections like to set up where skin is already "mad" (= inflamed), so allergic dogs end up with lots of skin infections. Or infections can target dogs with weak immune systems. Or with parasite problems. They seem to look for any weakness and target those skin areas. We can't know what the underlying "cause" of the weakness is at this point. You could even have all of these going on in the same dog!

So deal with any infection per the diagnosis in the skin scrape, and see what reveals after you treat it (whether it cycles seasonally, comes back on certain foods -- since you might need to do an elimination diet possibly anyway, you'll get some good info about the skin too on that, etc.).

What @Springbrz says is exactly right! I've overseen the treatment of more skin infected rescue dogs than I can even remember at this point -- many dozens. The shampoo protocol works!

With such a long time suffering, my worry her is that she could have staph or something else colonized deep in the skin by this point and need systemic (oral) meds -- I've had some rescued dogs who needed to be on abx for over 30 days to knock out colonized staph. Stopping them too soon (1-2 weeks) sometimes allows it to flare back up, and risks causing antibiotic resistance (leaving the dog worse off!), so I would ask the vet to be aggressive in the course of abx, IF they turn out to be needed. In that case, you'll have to rebuild the gut later, but when you have to get the staph out of the dog now, you do what you have to do. Remember: we're peeling layers of the onion, and the skin is the first layer to deal with after a proper diagnosis by a good vet.

With these dogs, our rescue's vet (who's a super star with treating bad skin and chronic, systemic issues) is a big fan of the antimicrobial shampoo protocol -- the breed rescue I work with buys it by the GALLON and distributes it to foster homes for itchy dogs because it does so much good, so cheaply. You can get a bottle on Amazon for under $20 and follow the bottle directions EXACTLY. Here's an example: Amazon.com: TrizChlor 4 Shampoo 8oz by Dechra [Pet Supplies] (many vets sell this for 3x the cost, and they use it in the clinic too). You can also choose one with ketoconozole as an extra ingredient on top of the chlorhex (sold with names like Keto-Chlor or Chlor-Keto) -- that adds some antifungal power. However, basic 4% chlorhex shampoo works for many, many dogs (if there's an enviro allergy component, simply washing off the allergens can give relief too).

The thing with the baths is that when a dog is infected, they have to be frequent until well after the problem seems to resolve: at least EVERY WEEK for a couple of months is commonly prescribed by vets (which won't strip the coat because it doesn't foam like regular shampoo). It's hard work. But it DOES help many dogs (just look at the reviews on Amazon for the shampoo to see what I mean).

If there are active sores on the dog, I would spray them in between baths with Vetericyn spray (the wound care spray -- get a big bottle and use it liberally on all sorts of skin problems and wounds). It doesn't sting, and it will help these sores heal faster.

You may need to buy a elizabethan collar ("cone of shame") from the vet or buy a good soft-e cone to use to stop her from licking until she gets better.

Lastly, some dogs with skin issues end up needing prescription anti-itch meds (Cytopoint or Apoquel). I view them as a last resort when we get to the center of the onion and all the infections and parasite problems are resolved, we've found a food the dog can tolerate well...but the itch persists. They're pricey, but they work and are a blessing for dogs that really suffer from terrible itching. They're not going to fix infected skin though, so we have to deal with all that mess first, if it's there.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hello! Thanks for all the feedback! 🙂 we do buy her high quality food. And our vet is actually one of the best in my state. She still licks her self and her anus
 
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