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Discussion Starter #1
So I have kind of a unique situation...I live on a ranch with my hubby and 2 dogs (our GSD and heeler). My husband and I have been running into issues when giving herding commands.

We move our cattle using horses and dogs, and we are both horseback we both try giving commands and we think that this is probably confusing the dogs?

Should only 1 person be in charge or is it not too confusing to have each of us give certain commands at different times (we aren't giving opposing commands but just that we both give commands when they are needed and if the dog is close to us)?

I have also wondered if training the dogs the basic come by and away to me commands using a whistle is better because then the dog doesn't know who is giving the command?

Anyway...we need some insight!!!:confused::confused::confused:
 

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I would think that as long as you are both consistent and on the same page, you both could give commands/directions with no conflict.

I'd love to see video of you working your dogs!!
 

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Sure I'll see if I can get some up...but probably only of our heeler ;) Ruger is still very new but is picking it up quick from our heeler.
 

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I wouldn't think there would be a conflict. If the dog is close to one of you and you need them to do something specific, the command should be followed by the person giving it. It makes sense. You could try the whistling thing but if they already know the commands and actions for them, stick with what you're doing.
 

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I wouldn't think there would be a conflict. If the dog is close to one of you and you need them to do something specific, the command should be followed by the person giving it. It makes sense. You could try the whistling thing but if they already know the commands and actions for them, stick with what you're doing.
Yes that is what we think too! However, our heeler tends to listen to the hubby more and Ruger tends to listen to me...but maybe we just need to practice more with both of them giving them commands from both of us.
 

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Yes that is what we think too! However, our heeler tends to listen to the hubby more and Ruger tends to listen to me...but maybe we just need to practice more with both of them giving them commands from both of us.

that may very well be the case.

if its possible, what about you each managing a dog? Obviously they need to listen to both of you when it comes down to it without issue but would that be possible? Keep a dog on their side of the herd while the other dog is on the opposite depending on who is on the side with the dog they manage more than the other?
 

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I am going to be the opposing view point. I think only one if you should be giving the commands.

I don't do herding, but when in training I expect my dog to only listen to me and ignore if someone else calls them or gives them a command.

I have a Lab that is whistle trained. And I work with other Labs that are also whistle trained, and she knows the difference. If they "double blow" to call their dog, she looks to me, to check if it was me, then ignores it.

I do think that both of you should be able to take the dogs out and work them, but I don't think you should be having two people give the dog commands on the same outing. One handler at a time.


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In a working situation, only one person should be providing commands to the dog(s). The dog(s) full attention should be on the cattle (sheep / duck etc.). Having multiple handlers can result in miscommunication between the handler and the dog which could have disasterous results.
 
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