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There are a lot of differences of opinion on this forum between trainers. I was hoping some people wouldn't mind listing the amount of time they have been training for sport or pp and a list of titles and how many titles. Breeders also welcome, what have your dogs achieved? How long have you been breeding.
 

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You are very trusting:)
 

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Ugh! We've lost so many experienced people! I really miss Fast. He cracked me up

Slamdunc
lhczth
Cliff
Vandal
Steve Strom
Leesa

Those are a few of the ones I know have worked dogs, many of them for decades, and have a lot of knowledge.
 

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Jax08,
Thanks!

I am honored that you would include me in a list with such Knowledgeable people. I would add your name to the list as well. ;)

There are quite a few very knowledgeable people here, some excellent breeders and very experienced working dog folks.
 

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Not me! lol This is only my first working dog. I'm still blissfully ignorant of all I do wrong!
 

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Not me! lol This is only my first working dog. I'm still blissfully ignorant of all I do wrong!
That statement earns some respect from me. To many people on here talk as though they have a life time of experience but when you look at their past posts or threads started and questions asked they have only been training for 2 or 3 years. Sometimes it's important to know what you don't know.
 

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We've had GSDs since 1986, but until fairly recently, my experience consisted of training our own pet dogs. Sneaker was super easy, she hardly counts in terms of training experience since we only took one obedience class with her and that was actually enough. She lived to 14-1/2 years old.

By the time we got Cassidy in 2000, I had pretty much forgotten the little I'd learned about dog training from when Sneaker was a puppy. She was, um.... NOT easy. :help: Cassidy had a whole host of temperament issues, including being severely leash reactive, and ended up being my crash course in dog training. I took numerous OB classes with her.

We lost her to a painful spinal disease at 4 years old and got Dena about a month later at 9 weeks old. She was the youngest puppy we'd had, Sneaker was 16 weeks old when we got her and Cassidy was 20 weeks. I set out teaching Dena everything I'd learned in all the classes I'd taken with Cassidy, and she was a fantastic dog. Because she was so great, we jumped at the chance to get her half sibling Keefer, when she was just over a year old. I ultimately wanted two dogs although I hadn't had any intention of them being so close in age. But by then she was practically perfect, so I felt like I could suspend her training for awhile to focus on him. He was also 9 weeks old when he came home. I did all the same foundation work with him that I had done when Dena was a pup. I had started agility classes with her shortly before we got Keef, and after a couple of classes with him, I went back and took did some more agility classes with her, but it was just for fun. We never came close to entering a trial.

Sadly, we also lost Dena young, she died of lymphoma when she was four years old. By then, Keefer was three, which was more along the lines of the age spacing I had originally intended. Sneaker and Cassidy were American lines, and Dena & Keefer are West German show lines.

It was tough losing two dogs so young, and we were not planning to start looking for a puppy for a few months. But then Halo's breeder posted pictures here, and some of the board members back then knew the breeder and trained with her. They had met Halo and thought she would be perfect for us, and encouraged us to contact the breeder. We had never had a working line dog before, so we weren't sure. We were also not sure about shipping a puppy all the way across the country that we'd never met, from a breeder that we'd never met. But in the end we decided we wanted her, and she was on a non-stop flight from the East coast to San Francisco a few days later. This was January 2009.

To be honest, I was a little nervous about having a working line puppy, so I basically started immediately and trained the crap out of her, lol! She was 10 weeks old when we got her, I worked with her at home for 3 weeks, and then we went through a variety of classes pretty much back to back until she was around a year old. She excelled, and was the star of her classes.

Finally, I decided I had enough basic obedience on her and it was time to try something fun, like agility or flyball. Agility classes are easy to find, but not flyball, so when I discovered a class not too far away at a convenient day and time, I signed her up. She. Loved. It. :D So, I looked for a more advanced class, and found one taught by a local flyball club. Eight and a half months later, she debuted at her first flyball tournament. That tournament was exactly four years ago tomorrow. Halo is currently ranked as the #26 GSD in the North American Flyball Association, out of a total of 340 GSDs that have been registered with the organization. She ran her fastest time a couple of weeks before her 6th birthday, and will get her Onyx award (20,000 total points) at her next tournament. She could be in the top 20 of her breed by the end of the year. Pretty proud of my girl. :wub:

 

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I think there are some here with shorter training careers than those mentioned above, but still have a wealth of knowledge. Baillif and Mycobraracer come to mind, there's more but my brain is tired, lol
 

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I think there are some here with shorter training careers than those mentioned above, but still have a wealth of knowledge. Baillif and Mycobraracer come to mind, there's more but my brain is tired, lol
Yes good call, my thoughts exactly! It would be hard to remember all the knowledgeable and list them. I'm sure I would forget some.
 

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This forum is full of really good people and info, for the most part. I personally know of a handful people on here that are very experienced with training GSD's and have many years experience; Wolfstraum and Leesa have really helped me out a lot and are as experienced as it gets when it comes to GSDs. This should make for an interesting thread
 

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Well, the title of there thread could be tweaked a little. I might suggest, "what experience do you have?" "Or what dogs have you titled?" Or how about "Tell us a little about your experience? Dogs that you have trained, dogs that you have titled,etc." I'm not sure we can quantify who the most experienced is. I know some folks that have been selling and training dogs for 40 years that still get it wrong. :) I know some folks that started and learned and made the WUSV team with HOT (handler owner trained dogs) in a relatively short time.

Ok, I'll bite and give a brief resume.

I have been interested in dogs all my life, from a child. My goal as a kid was to pet every dog that I saw. The more the dogs growled, barked or became aggressive, the more I was determined to pet them. Similar to George Costanza, I must be liked. Well, I got bit a lot. Then, as I kid, I started reading body language and reading behavior. It helped with not getting bit as much. I've had dogs all my life, my first GSD in 1984, an ASL. In 94' I got a WGSL puppy, Zeus vom Mimosenweg aka "Herman." I got into Schutzhund, now IPO. That dog was aggressive, sharp and handler aggressive. I raised him from a pup and titled him to a SchH 3. I handled and showed him at several conformation shows, including regional shows where he was V rated. This was back in time when SL dogs had drive, aggression and worked. The sharpness of that dog caused me to be a better handler and learn. I made a lot of mistakes and vowed to do better with my next dog. I was fortunate to train with some excellent IPO people and many K-9 guys. I saw the differences in patrol and IPO dogs, met K-9 guys from Germany and saw how sport work could benefit training. I was exposed to seminars with some world level handlers and trainers and soaked up everything I could. Like biscuits and gravy. I got another GSD in '99, Annabelle von Einschuh and trained and titled her from a pup to a SchH 3, IPO 2. In the meantime I handled SL dogs in regional and National Sieger SHows for breeders. I adapted my training methods with Annabelle, much to her benefit. I also had a White GSD that I rescued. I spent a lot of time assisting with GSD rescue and evaluating dogs for them. I became a cop and got into K-9 myself. I am now the K-9 trainer for my unit and a certified trainer with the VPWDA. I got my current K-9, Boomer as a pup and was working him in IPO. Boomer would have been a National Level IPO dog, not my statement, but agreement from some of the top trainers that we have worked with. I had Boomer doing a full IPO 1 routine at a year old and put a BH on him. I then decided to use him as my Dual Purpose Patrol / Narcotics K-9. I transitioned Boomer from IPO training to Patrol and street work. Boomer has been an exceptional Patrol dog. I hold the record for having the fastest "real" street bite after coming out of the K-9 school. Boomer tracked and apprehended a subject wanted for rape two days before he hit the street for his first patrol shift. A great start to his career, and he has had quite a career. That dog has made me look good everyday on the street. Boomer has earned lots of awards, newspaper articles and accolades. I simply drive him to the spot and hold the leash. Easy day. I have also worked Boomer on the SWAT team for several years.

My job now, aside from my patrol and narcotics work is the unit K-9 trainer for my Dept and our Sheriffs Dept. I have implemented and manage an in house K-9 training program for out new handlers and dogs. I run a 4 month school for detection and Patrol K-9's, each year.

I have been very fortunate that in my dual IPO and K-9 work, I get to meet and train with top handlers form around the world. I will bring trainers in from Germany, Holland and the US to train in IPO and K-9 training.

I ma currently training a young female GSD, Francesca. She is imprinted on Narcotics and ready to certify as a Narcotics K-9. She is also in training for IPO and will be titled. An excellent tracking dog, super bite work for IPO, and OB is coming along. Her OB is lacking only because I am lazy and would rather hang out with this super nice and cute GSD then do OB.

Boomer turned 10 years old on 3/14 and will be retiring in the upcoming months. I am currently training a new Patrol dog, Boru. Boru is a 3 1/2 year old Belgian Malinois X Dutch Sheperd, I started training him in February. An awesome dog that will make any cop feel safe knowing he is on scene. Boru is not the easiest dog and already has 5 real bites in training. Four before I got him, with a SF team, and that is why a dog of his caliber was available to me. The 5th was a buddy of mine who took him for a walk while I was on vacation. This dog is no joke and needed an experienced handler. Never wanting to back down from a challenge I took him.
I really like this dog and have worked to develop trust and a bond. The dog is super affectionate with me and we get along great. Things are going well, right now I'm super stoked with this dog.

In addition to the dogs that I have raised and trained, I've been decoying in SchH and IPO since the mid 90's. I've been a certified decoy in both the WDA and USA. I'm a member of USA'a SchH 3 club. I've done the decoy work on many dogs from pups to IPO 3. I've worked a few IPO dogs over the years and have done Decoy work at many trials, including one National Trial. It was a Bouvier national, not sure that counts. :) But, Bouviers can be very serious dogs. A Bouvier may be fluffy, but they are no joke. I currently work a variety of Police dogs every week and still do IPO and decoy every week.

By far I am not the most experienced poster on here. I think the IPO experience that I have and the world class trainers that I have met have taught me a tremendous amount. Taking that experience and adding it to my K-9 training experience has given me a unique perspective. This is just what I do, because I love working dogs. Now, when I get bit I usually have equipment, as opposed to when I was a kid. I'm a little smarter and no longer feel the need to pet every aggressive dog that I meet. :)
 

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Well, the title of there thread could be tweaked a little. I might suggest, "what experience do you have?" "Or what dogs have you titled?" Or how about "Tell us a little about your experience? Dogs that you have trained, dogs that you have titled,etc." I'm not sure we can quantify who the most experienced is. I know some folks that have been selling and training dogs for 40 years that still get it wrong. :) I know some folks that started and learned and made the WUSV team with HOT (handler owner trained dogs) in a relatively short time.
:thumbup: I agree. I've had GSDs for a long time - in August it will be 30 years. But my accomplishments with our dogs pale in comparison to so many others. Really, my focus has been on well behaved companion dogs up until Halo, and I've only gone beyond that because she is so amazing that to have not gone on to compete in a sport would have been a travesty. But still, the best sport dog is nothing compared to REAL working dogs.
 

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I think sport dogs and training and competing is awesome. it takes a tremendous amount of hard work, time and dedication. I am always impressed with people that dog any sport with their dogs. I am bringing an agility person out to our K-9 training to show our guys how an obstacle course should be run.

I firmly believe in working with sport people, SAR and other specialty venues to learn how they do things. We are all working dogs, and I can learn from anyone that works a dog in sport. Obedience is critical to LE dogs, agility is super important as well and SAR folks generally track better than LE guys. I have learned and stolen many techniques from various dog training venues.

Don't ever sell your sport work short, I think it is awesome!
 

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Quantity and quality are two different things and when it comes to training I would say quality would be more important.
 

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Got my first GSD in 1985. Started training in SAR in 2003 but in a new team and struggling to find out way figure things out. Don't really feel like things started clicking solidly until 2008. I will agree with the statement quantity is not quality. For some this comes fast and easy and for others not so much. I will say though that so much of the pain we felt in the early years helped newer folks come up with a straighter path to success.
 

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I just wanted to chime in and say Jim (slamdunc), I admire your humility, you have an impressive amount of experience. Thanks for sharing
 

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We have some young up and coming trainers on the forum.

In addition to "Mr. Tell it like it is" Bailiff. ;) :D

Blitz is walking the walk!!

Gator dog, Alexis is a rising star in the IPO world, went to the national level last year with her Carma. All girl team! :D

Great idea for a thread btw!

Me. I'm just a newbie learning how hard this IPO stuff is!
 

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There are a lot of differences of opinion on this forum between trainers. I was hoping some people wouldn't mind listing the amount of time they have been training for sport or pp and a list of titles and how many titles. Breeders also welcome, what have your dogs achieved? How long have you been breeding.
I just like talking about dogs J&J. I don't have any kind of credentials or special knowledge or skills. I am lucky to be in an area where there are a lot of really good people in just about every formal venue, so I've made some good friends over the years through dog stuff.

I wouldn't discount anything anyone posts, just because they haven't done something in a formal setting. Everything with dog training is experience, I agree with that line of thinking, but everyone who's taught their dog to walk on a leash has learned something that can be passed on. When it comes to biting, I think there can be some bad advice here and there and its something that has to be taken very seriously, but for the most part things tend to be an ongoing conversation and you end up with options to consider.
 
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