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:laugh:HERRO PWEEPLE! So, if you saw my previous post, I was asking about a dog breed similar to GSD's. With all for your guys' help, I decided an Australian Shepherd (Aussie) would be perfect. Now I can only foster first:mad::(, upon my dad's wishes, and so I can't just go straight to a breeder or shelter because I can not adopt yet. So, I searched for HOURS for a good rescue in Southern California (I live in Orange County, CA), and failed to find one. Well, I found two, but the websites were very hard to navigate through, and I got lost and gave up! So, I was wondering if any of you guys know a good rescue, shelter, friend etc. in the southern california region that needs or wants a foster for an AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD. Thank you!:) PLEASE get back to me!:help::eek:
 

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Is this one of the websites you went to? Aussie Rescue SoCal It is a little busy - but they have a Facebook link, I would "like" them on FB.

Here is the foster app, it appears you have to just fill it out and e-mail it.

foster home application

I think it's very responsible to foster first!

Also, don't be mad or surprised if it takes a while for them to get back to you, it's all volunteer work and people are swamped in rescue. Follow up via email, phone or FB if you feel like it's been TOO long.
 

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Is this one of the websites you went to? Aussie Rescue SoCal It is a little busy - but they have a Facebook link, I would "like" them on FB.

Here is the foster app, it appears you have to just fill it out and e-mail it.

foster home application

I think it's very responsible to foster first!

Also, don't be mad or surprised if it takes a while for them to get back to you, it's all volunteer work and people are swamped in rescue. Follow up via email, phone or FB if you feel like it's been TOO long.
Thanks!! Appreciate it! :) That was one of the two I was talking about, but I was trying to find the dogs that need foster home, but I guess it doesn't matter. Gratsi!
 

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and there ya go,

You can also check on Australian Shepherd Rescue Page where there are tons of aussies for adoptions, I think there are links to different rescues as well.

Just a heads up, most rescues may want the foster home to have a fenced yard..and the dogs would NOT sleep outside, be outside unattended..that type of thing, so be prepared for rules when you foster.
 

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I used to foster for ARPH (aussie rescue and placement helpline) but I am in east. I know they are a national organization but I don't know how strong their presence is out west. The below link has a list of Aussie rescue organizations along with links to their websites. Good luck. I love Aussies.

Australian Shepherd Rescue Page
 

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iirc I saw in another thread that you're not 18 yet. If I'm not just hallucinating that (and I might be!), then you may find that some rescues will require your parents to submit the paperwork, and some may turn you down altogether for liability reasons.

Not saying you should get discouraged in advance, just trying to give a heads-up not to get too disheartened if that happens. They've got their reasons.

Also, if you're open to Aussie mixes (and in your situation I can't think of any reason not to be, particularly since some mixes will be smaller than the purebreds and size seems to be a consideration), be sure to let the rescues know that. Fosters for mixes are often even harder to find, and that may help them look more favorably on your application.
 

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I agree with Merciel about the age thing.

Your dad has to be on board, and willing to accept the responsibility in the long run. You also have to be willing to a home visit , and as I said before, they may require a fence, the dog would HAVE to live in the house, no tie outs/chaining outside.

There are quite a few rules that have to be considered and agreed to.
 

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Find an Australian Shepherd club near you, and get to know the breed.
You can't decide from two posts on the Internet that the breed is perfect for you.
Australian shepherds are very high-energy and they take a lot of time to train.

Find out what is needed and what you're getting into.
 

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Find an Australian Shepherd club near you, and get to know the breed.
You can't decide from two posts on the Internet that the breed is perfect for you.
Australian shepherds are very high-energy and they take a lot of time to train.

Find out what is needed and what you're getting into.
^^ this exactly!
 

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I agree this decision requires careful research OP will try to foster first with her father's blessing.....

But...as a long time Aussie admirer, having cared for Aussies and now owning one I don't get what the deal is with 'very' high energy?

As a rule they are more mellow then border collies and I've been around some workingline GSDs that make our little Autumn look like a turtle in the energy dept.

Also I've found them easy to handle and/or train. I'd go so far to say our Aussie has been one of the easiest dogs to train I've ever had. She's like a little human in a dog suit is what I always say. I know individual dogs vary but overall I've found them to be highly trainable.

:confused:

Find an Australian Shepherd club near you, and get to know the breed.
You can't decide from two posts on the Internet that the breed is perfect for you.
Australian shepherds are very high-energy and they take a lot of time to train.

Find out what is needed and what you're getting into.
 

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Are you looking into fostering because you can't get a dog for keeps? If so, what about volunteering at a shelter? Personally, I find fostering exhausting, though in a good way. My fosters have been a lot of work, often much more than the dogs I have adopted or purchased "for keeps". I've never quite understood why people suggest fostering for those that aren't prepared for the responsibility of owning a dog. I never accept a foster into my home that I couldn't keep indefinitely if something happened (no one adopted it, the rescue broke up, the dog was returned, etc) so for me, fostering IS as much of a responsibility and commitment as owning a dog for keeps.

I used to volunteer at a shelter where I got to exercise dogs and do some basic training. They allowed minors to be involved (huge dogs or dogs that were too much for younger people were marked as such). It was good experience but I wasn't financially responsible for the dogs and didn't take the risk of having them in my home (would they destroy my house, howl all day, pick fights with my other dogs, etc).
 

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I don't want to put words in another boarder's mouth, but I do think that some of the higher-energy breeds (BCs, Aussies, ACDs, etc.) in rescue can live up to their wild-child stereotypes and then some.

The rescue population is skewed a bit in that direction because it's comprised of dogs whose original owners gave them up, and one reason that owners give up high-energy herding breeds is because they can't handle the energy. So there does tend to be a certain number of dogs who are on the higher end of the activity spectrum, and who often haven't received any training to help them figure out how to handle their overflowing energy. On top of that, IME, a fair number of these dogs are coming out of homes where the solution was just to crate the dog constantly, and they are nuts.

A good rescue won't place these dogs with an inexperienced first-time foster, so hopefully it won't be an issue for the OP, but they're definitely out there, and it can create a very different perception of what these breeds are "really" like than if you only encounter them in the context of carefully bred sport dogs who have spent their entire lives being groomed by knowledgeable owners for specific activities.
 

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yeah....but we know better then to stereotype an entire breed by a few rescued individuals on this board, right?

For the most part they are nice dogs that are tractable and fun AND IME easy to train or just be around.
 

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Oh sure, absolutely. My freestyle instructor's competition dogs were all Aussies. Lovely, eager, happy partners, every one of them. And I've seen dogs with just as much heart (although not nearly as much training!) in rescue. So they're certainly out there to be found.

Although every time we (and here I mean the general board-wide "we," not just you and I) get to talking about which breeds are "easy to train" or "high energy" or whatever else, I wonder how useful those descriptors actually are to a first-time owner who has nothing to compare them to. It's like telling a teetotaler that one wine is more tannic than another. Absent experience to anchor it, I feel like our descriptions must necessarily be of limited use.

Not that that has anything to do with anything, it's just a thought that popped into my head that I am now typing because hey why not.
 
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