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When exactly did it start that people started to lose their common dog sense and started humanizing dogs to the point that dogs can't even be dogs anymore.

When has it started that you can't even keep dogs outdoors or intact anymore because that makes you an irresponsible and unfit owner and people steal your dogs because of that?

Since when is it fancier to call yourself a Dog Guardian instead of a Dog Owner?

What happened and where is it leading us and most importantly why and when did it actually start?
 

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I started seeing changes coming around in the mid 80s or so. Though before then most training I ever saw was strictly harsh compulsion. I think the pendulum swings wide and far on al that.
 

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I think there is a growing awareness that animals are capable of far more than we thought - not just dogs - other animals as well, and that people who want to, can open their minds to that, and see where it goes.

Dogs can show empathy. It seems part of their very nature. We on the other hand, do not seem to always have this as an innate part of who we are - but perhaps it is not a bad idea to see what you can see from a dog's eye view.

When we stop learning, we stop growing. I know it is not exactly human to open your mind to new things, but maybe instead of discounting everything that you do not believe or understand without examining it, slow down and take a look. How is it that dogs can learn our language, but we can be so oblivious to theirs? Things like that...are interesting.

Though it is very protective to believe that we are superior to all other species and often, other beings of our own species. However, we are animals and share biology with animals (think rats, chimps that are similar enough to pass in experiments).

I am not saying dogs are people and people are dogs. I am saying it is far more nuanced and less absolute, in my mind, and I can deal with it as being the unknown.
 

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Like most things, such as correcting children for instance. The extremes hit the headlines and then you're made to feel guilty by extremists for doing any kind of correction.

You're a bad parent if you ever smack your child - because other people beat their children.

You a bad dog owner because you leave your dog outside, because others leave their dogs to rot alone in the yard.

It seems to be all or nothing - when in reality most people occupy the middle ground.

That being said - it's a good thing- because it makes us think, and maybe realise there is a better way. So although we'll still occupy the middle ground we'll air more towards caution and consider more the feelings of others - animal or human.
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I also think this started in the early 80s.

I had a dog for 18 years, and got him as a tiny little thing in 1986. Had all the normal pet paraphernalia, just leash, collar, and a couple of Nylabones for him.
Fast forward to 2012, when I was getting ready for Hans, and I went into Petsmart and had an unreal feeling. The products and accessories for dogs were something I hadn't yet seen, nor imagined. Dresses, T-shirts, nail polish (!) collars of every kind imaginable, and worst of all, in my opinion, strollers.
Really, folks?
A dog in a stroller?:eek:
I am thinking this coincides with people becoming more hermit like, not needing to go out and interact with humans, because we have our computers and can purchase everything we need at night in our pajamas, and go out a lot less.
Lots of people living by themselves, too, so their partner becomes the dog. They humanize the dog and see it as a person with fur.
Also, we tend to indulge ourselves a lot more, so this spills over onto our animals, as well.

Incoherent, this post. I have so much to say on this, but for now I need coffee and have to start the morning routine, including feeding my dog. :D Not furkid.
Dog.


When exactly did it start that people started to lose their common dog sense and started humanizing dogs to the point that dogs can't even be dogs anymore.

When has it started that you can't even keep dogs outdoors or intact anymore because that makes you an irresponsible and unfit owner and people steal your dogs because of that?

Since when is it fancier to call yourself a Dog Guardian instead of a Dog Owner?

What happened and where is it leading us and most importantly why and when did it actually start?
 

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I grew up in India and let me tell you, in developing countries, most people don't have the luxury of humanizing or personalizing animals. Most dogs in India are street dogs that are homeless and scavenge in the streets for food. Dogs that were kept as "pets" had a job to do. Usually it had to do with defending the home or acting as an alert dog. Dogs were always kept inside and it was really unthinkable to have "house" dogs. I had GSDs then as well. They were always outside dogs. My connection and love for them was no less than now and I don't believe my dogs are any "happier" now. They are dogs. They live in the moment. As long as they are comfortable, have their basic needs met and can thrive in a conducive environment, they were all happy, loved and nourished. Whether they were inside or not for example. ;)

When I moved to the US, it was a totally different experience. The first dog that my family had in the US lived outside for the first 2 years. You should have heard the things that Americans that visited us would say :) You would have thought that we were chaining a human child in the basement or something.
To us...it is the norm. Animals get treated like animals. That is not necessarily a bad thing. That only means that they don't get coddled, babied and fancied (not meaning these terms as derogatory, only as how we view the situation). I'm not sure when it started in the US, but it was a HUGE shock as an outsider! The first time I saw a dog in a baby carriage, I just about died laughing!

I think part of it is the luxury of it all. When you are worried about getting food on the table or making sure your kids have tuition for school, you tend not to obsess so much over if your dog has an orthopedic bed in his 5-star accommodations :p

It's interesting to see this now play out in developing countries like India. Now that India is getting more developed and there is a rising middle class, dogs seem to be treated better and better. I have a good amount of people interested in importing a dog for thousands of dollars. That would have been unthinkable for the average family 20 years ago.
 

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I don't necessarily think of them as human, but they are a living breathing creature that deserves to be treated accordingly. I respect my dogs and they respect me. I would never personally leave a dog outside because I would feel guilty. I fix my dogs because I don't want to be part of the overpopulation of homeless dogs, could I avoid an oops litter? Yes, but I'm not taking that chance. Not to mention, I would probably end up keeping all the puppies:rolleyes: Dogs love people unconditionally, too bad people can't be the same way. They want to be around us, they pick up on our feelings, and they don't talk back:) I would do anything for my dogs and people who know me know this. I enjoy everything they offer and what is so hard about giving some back? A fine example is people who can't have children, many of them have dogs and that fills the void in their life...Why?, because in reality dogs need the same thing kids do...food, water, a roof over their head, structure, exercise, etc:) I firmly believe that if a dog is taken into the home and it has issues, getting rid of the dog would be no different then putting a child with problems up for adoption. People need to realize that while dogs aren't human they shouldn't be considered disposable either.
 

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I firmly believe that if a dog is taken into the home and it has issues, getting rid of the dog would be no different then putting a child with problems up for adoption. People need to realize that while dogs aren't human they shouldn't be considered disposable either.
So regardless of the welfare of the other dogs in the household or the needs of the dog in question, no dog should ever be rehomed or euthanized?
 

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I find qbchottu's post about India interesting. When I was in college I had a TA from Africa who said one of the most shocking things for him about the US was the way we treat our pets. Where he was from animals did not come in the house, let alone sleep on the beds with humans.

I think of my dogs more as family members than pets. Same with our cats. I don't think of them as human, but they are more to me than the pets I had growing up. The pets I had growing up did seem more like just pets. Not saying one is better than the other, just a different philosophy as I get older.
 

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I agree that the most noticible changes started in the 80's BUT I think the popularity of the internet pushed the changes faster. Even as late as '95 when I moved down here my neighbors were aghast that I had FOUR German Shepherds LIVING IN THE HOUSE!!! Unheard of!!! Now almost all my neighbors have house dogs.

I don't mind people who humanize dogs, live and let live, but I resent it when they try to push their beliefs on others.
 

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The problem with humanizing dogs is the owner not educating himself regarding dog behavior, body language, and needs. The dog is treated like a baby and unrealistic expectations are placed on the animal. When the inevitable problems arise, said owner is frustrated and even angry with the "ungrateful" dog. Dog ends up in the shelter, sadly , for being a dog.
 

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I can't really say when it started since I grew up with a dog that was in the house and slept on my bed at night, my sister and I called him our brother and he ment the world to us. I know growing up my Mom and Dad never had a dog in the house but they did have dogs they loved.
I think couples deciding not to have kids and that being a more accepted part of society has played a big role in how dogs are seen as little humans, because I see alot of people who have made that decision, but have dogs or cats in their lives now that they treat like the children they never had.
 

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Now you also have all the issues of liability. It used to be if a kid jumped the fence and got bit on the butt by the resident dog, the parents yelled at the kid and the dog lived another day. Now the dog dies and the parents sue the owner and Junior learns that not respecting other people's property pays off nicely. That, and if someone doesn't like your dog because it barks for five seconds twice a day, your dog gets Antifreeze Pudding.

Sometimes it really is just safer for everyone to have the dog inside. When I have my own home, I'm putting up an 8' perimiter fence with angled barbed wire up top.... :paranoid:
 

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The problem with humanizing dogs is the owner not educating himself regarding dog behavior, body language, and needs. The dog is treated like a baby and unrealistic expectations are placed on the animal. When the inevitable problems arise, said owner is frustrated and even angry with the "ungrateful" dog. Dog ends up in the shelter, sadly , for being a dog.
Yes! This is my biggest issue with anthropomorphizing animals. Completely unrealistic expectations for a creature that doesn't posses the capacity to perceive the world like a human being. Then this poor thing is faulted as a result of human ignorance.
 

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I think there is a growing awareness that animals are capable of far more than we thought - not just dogs - other animals as well, and that people who want to, can open their minds to that, and see where it goes.

Dogs can show empathy. It seems part of their very nature. We on the other hand, do not seem to always have this as an innate part of who we are - but perhaps it is not a bad idea to see what you can see from a dog's eye view.

When we stop learning, we stop growing. I know it is not exactly human to open your mind to new things, but maybe instead of discounting everything that you do not believe or understand without examining it, slow down and take a look. How is it that dogs can learn our language, but we can be so oblivious to theirs? Things like that...are interesting.

Though it is very protective to believe that we are superior to all other species and often, other beings of our own species. However, we are animals and share biology with animals (think rats, chimps that are similar enough to pass in experiments).

I am not saying dogs are people and people are dogs. I am saying it is far more nuanced and less absolute, in my mind, and I can deal with it as being the unknown.
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Marketing. Marketing. Marketing. It's all about the money.

I remember when it was just the older generation that had pocket pooches that filled the nest when they enjoyed their retirement years. That generation was guilty of having pets they treated as children. It was cute, it made them happy and the younger generation didn't have to feel guilty about not including mom & pop in their everyday life.

Then folks started making money off of the folks who'd spend it - dog toys, beds, clothes, kennels, crates, insurance, better collars, leads, training devices etc. the list goes on and on. Along comes cable..the internet..suddenly everyone is a dog trainer (selling videos and books) everyone makes the best dog food, everyone has the best dog toys. They use guilt to make you believe that if you don't buy their product you don't love your pet. You have no excuse, you don't even have to get your fat butt off the chair in front of your computer.

It's all about the money.
 

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I think there is a growing awareness that animals are capable of far more than we thought - not just dogs - other animals as well, and that people who want to, can open their minds to that, and see where it goes.

Dogs can show empathy. It seems part of their very nature. We on the other hand, do not seem to always have this as an innate part of who we are - but perhaps it is not a bad idea to see what you can see from a dog's eye view.

When we stop learning, we stop growing. I know it is not exactly human to open your mind to new things, but maybe instead of discounting everything that you do not believe or understand without examining it, slow down and take a look. How is it that dogs can learn our language, but we can be so oblivious to theirs? Things like that...are interesting.

Though it is very protective to believe that we are superior to all other species and often, other beings of our own species. However, we are animals and share biology with animals (think rats, chimps that are similar enough to pass in experiments).

I am not saying dogs are people and people are dogs. I am saying it is far more nuanced and less absolute, in my mind, and I can deal with it as being the unknown.

I fully agree with this. While I don't think people should "humanize" any animal I do think that studies are showing that animals (not just dogs) are far more capable of emotion and thought than we ever imagined. It is being proven more and more every day that animals can bond, love, learn, and mourn than we ever knew.

We have learned that crows can problem solve and use tools. Chimpanzees, when shown a mirror, will become self aware. They have also learned to communicate with humans using sign language.
Elephants recognize old "friends" after years of separation and will intensely grieve the loss of a friend while others will support that elephant in her grief.
And anyone who has lived with and loved dogs KNOW they are capable of love and affection, will mourn a pack member or lost owner.

No animal is capable of higher, rational thinking. Obviously they can't do math or contemplate the beginning of the universe. BUT they do and can think and feel on a basic level and while I don't agree with putting a dog in a stroller, I do think we (humans) need to start treating ALL animals on this planet better.
 

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It began when humans finally realized dogs, among other animals, are living, breathing, dreaming, feeling creatures who have their own instincts and way of life.

Dogs are not humans, they are dogs. That, however, does not make them less. By less, I mean less worthy of the things we enjoy (comfort, food, happiness, safety, kindness and compassion).
 
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