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Discussion Starter #1
First let me say that my wife and I have enjoyed reading this forum. It has help us tremendously with raising or beautiful little GSD girl Shelby. Well… not so little anymore, she turned 6.5 months the other day and is close to 70 pounds. She has been extremely healthy (with the exception of one bout with some bad food) and has been unbelievably easy and a joy to raise.

However, recently what we thought was just a goofy looking start off stride, has become more pronounced. It’s hard to describe, it is almost as if one of her front legs is longer than the other. This causes a kinda up/down bobble “her street pimping strut” when she walks. Before when she did it, it lasted only a moment and it was like she caught her stride and it went away. Now it continues the entire walk. It does not look like a limp or that she is favoring one leg over another. And Shelby does not act like she is in any pain. Come to think of it I have never heard the dog cry since we got her at 8 weeks. I have squeezed, poked, prodded, and pushed every part of her legs all the way up to her shoulder blades and she looks at me like, “this game is no fun….lets go really play.” She lives to hike and walk and play in the river and not taking her seems cruel to us.

We are concerned about walking her and taking her hiking until she has had X-rays which is scheduled for day after tomorrow. She is very confused as to why we are not at least patrolling the neighborhood. Since this has started, we have read all kinds of things now about Pano, HD and Elbow Dyplasia and hope it is none of these things. My question is, Is it possible that we are overreacting and this is just an awkward physical stage she is going through like being the lanky teenager?

Thank you for any advice,

Steve & Robin
 

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The age of your pup is about when Panosteitis hits, could be pano?
And most GSD's are very stoic, so only show pain when it really is bad
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I am sure it is not the speed that we walk.

Question about Pano.

We have read some conflicting information about activity after diagnosis. Some reports suggest restricting the dog’s activity has not been shown to have an effect on the healing process. Other people say rest and little to zero activity… even crating the dog for long periods of time. Do any of you have an opinion on this if the Vet says it indeed Panosteitis?

Thanks again,
Steve & Robin
 

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I would let the dog limit the exercise, of course sensible owner supervising! It took about two or three weeks to get thru a bout when Onyx had pano at 6 mos. She was a long, tall 70+lb pup(sounds like Shelby is good sized as well?)
When she was spayed during this time, the vet put her on rimadyl for the spay pain, but after the second and third bout, I put her on Ascription instead. That way she could still feel the pain, not overdue it but take the edge off. It just has to go thru its course,IMO, so limit the exercise somewhat, but zero activity wouldnt be good for the rest of the body and mind, especially an active puppy!
 

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Canine Eosinophilic Panosteitis
Definition
+ Panosteits is a disease in which there is inflammatory and degenerative changes of the medullary (the medulla= the middle compartment of long (e.g. leg) bones.
+ The medulla of bones is a soft tissue space surrounded by hard (cortical) bone; it contains marrow (fat and blood cell precurosrs).

Causes
+ Viral: causes are presently unclear but there is considerable evidence that there is an underlying viral etiology. Some speculate that Canine Distemper infection or vaccination may each play an important role.

Clinical Signs
+ Large/ Giant Breed Dogs:especially German Shepherds and Rottweillers.
+ Young : Dogs are usually young--(5-12 months) but disease has been reported in animals as young as 2 months and as old as 7yrs
+ Male Dogs: are more commonly affected than females.
+ History includes:
# variable inappetance or anorexia
# Sudden Onset of Lameness without history of trauma
# Wax-Wane/Shifting: lamess is variable and may shift to different limbs
# Front Limbs more likely affected
# Not Affected By Rest or Exercise
+ Physical Exam
# Intermittent Fever
# Pain on palpation of the bone (50% of patients)
# Tonsilitis: some animals have this concurrently

Diagnosis
+ Blood Evaluation may show elevated white blood cell counts--especially with elevated eosinophils (a type of white cell)---or results may be completely normal.
+ X-Rays: radiographs of affected long bone(s) show variable changes in the density of the medullary cavity; the appearance varies with the phase (early, middle or late) of the disease.

Treatment/Prognosis
+ Supportive: management of pain is crucial--aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug as needed during the painful (4-6 weeks) period.
+ Resolution: the problem can persist for several months...but eventually will resolve.
 
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