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Today while on our walk, a lose little dog ran up to us. It had no owner, no tags and no collar. I ran the other way but was too slow so I turned around and stomped at it and told it 'NO!' in a stern tone. It walked away but then came full blown at us again. At this point Smokey and Zeeva were very upset and at the end of their leashes crying/whining. When it came within reach of them I don't know what happened...the little dog simply ran away again happy-go-lucky and did not turn back. I was mortified. I understand that a prong helps you control a dog, but I often wonder if it negatively impacts their psyche; makes them think that 'oh if I go near that dog that dog will cause me to be uncomfortable so maybe I should eliminate the dog' when in reality it's the prong that causes the discomfort. Similarly, when I walk my two, and there is someone else walking their dog(s), I usually get off the sidewalk, onto the gravel or grass and give them a wide girth. I wonder if this also negatively impacts the dogs psyche; makes them think 'I shouldn't be around dogs for any reason at all'. I came back without my dogs to find it and asked the people walking around in the area if they'd seen it. Finally, I came across someone who said they saw someone scoop up the dog and take it away.

What would your dog have done in this situation?

Then while my dogs were romping around in the yard, I heard them bark and the backyard gate banging. I ran outside and saw our neighbors little dog fence fighting with my two :c. They redirected their attention from the gate and the little dog to each other and when I took a hold of their collars they finally calmed down. I sat them down as the neighbor scooped up both her little dogs away from my gate...

What would your dog have done in this situation?

What is an appropriate reaction to these kind of situations and how do you attempt to have your dogs behave appropriately?

Can I use other dogs on walks to train good behavior from my dogs or is this too dangerous? I can't decide. Most of the dogs I see around here are fairly well behaved. I see a golden that's always off leash. A husky that usually drags its owner. One lab with a basket muzzle. A handful of GSDs one of which I'm terrified of because of it's size and it's menacing stare at my dogs. Many small dogs. I would like to train my dogs to ignore other dogs on walks so I don't have to give such a wide girth to other dog owners...
 

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My Sting wouldn't have had a chance to go after the little dog (which he dearly would loved to do). He would have looked at me to fetch out the treat for him obeying and following me. This has happened and I do what you do - curve - go in the other direction - tell the loose dog to go home. Sting wears a front ring harness so I don't have to worry about the corrections part. I have a fenced in backyard -so there aren't any canine trespassers.
 

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My GSD would have assumed it was play time and would have tried to do so, if the little dog attacked her, she would look at it like it was crazy and then look at me like okay, can we get this dog to shut up. My golden would react almost the same way, but he would probably bark. My oldest would sit down and look at the dog, but if the dog went for her, she would be the one to react and put it in its place, but she would let it go and not carry on to the extent of hurting the dog. The GSD and Golden have had lots of training with dogs as distractions and I can see the difference in how they would act versus my oldest one who didn't have that training.
 

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Fiona would think that it is time to play chase. She did break the leash to chase a dog. But as soon as the owner picked up the dog, Fiona lost interest.


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You are thinking too much. Thats never a good thing. From what you say you do the right physical behavior by making your dog move to the side and sit etc... but you have to have a proper mindset as well. Thats some Cesar Milan stuff...

My dog has never been aggressive even though we play tug an hour plus per day. She wouldve done some play bounces and if the little dog didnt play back my 45 lb pup would do bouncing plus barking. If the little pup got dominant my girl will go ears down and under my feet- Im fine with that. Its not my pup submitting to the other dog, its her knowing theres one boss in the room- me. And given that, its not worth fighting for 2nd, 3rd, 4th place.
 

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My dog would have wanted to play. I would have made her go down. Depending on the body language of the dog, I would have either let them smell each other, or screamed "no" to make it move away. I would not have ran away, but walk at a normal pace.

Having two dogs with makes a big difference. My neighbors who walk two dogs together never seem to be able to control both of them. One might be better than the other, but it seems too difficult to do any corrections to the naughtier one. One friend has two Huskies. The one that is Molly's age went through twice as much training as her and is very good alone at the training facility. The younger female had basic training. When they are together the older one gets highly protective or they want to play with each other, they are in their own world and do not respond to commands. IMO, they are both too large and strong for the owner to handle them effectively. Maybe you can do more individual walks with your dogs and see if that helps.
 

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Mine would have been curious, but not wanting to attack it. As for fence fighting. I don't allow that. If my dogs start barking at the neighbors dog I out a stop to it. Thankfully the neighbor is catching on and I hear him making his dog be quiet to.

The few times we have gone to the dog park the dogs in the park run and bark all along the fence at dogs walking past. All three of my dogs ignore them and just continue walking.
 

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Archer's pretty oblivious/bemused by small dogs, it's like he can't fully figure out what they are. He was attacked by some kind of cushion stuffing furball when he was younger and I had to spend the guts of three weeks tromping around Stanaway Park (the most boring park on the planet, filled with older folk and their little dogs) to knock it into his mallet head that little dogs are to be tolerated and ignored as much as dogly possible.
It paid off in spades, now he doesn't really pay too much attention to them other than give them a good look. Plus I pack walk Archer a few times a week with a huge variety of dogs, off lead. Dogs have lost some of that mystery to him- finally! ( of course now we're hitting 14 months and the 'oh you want me to do that do you? Well let me think about it' period has begun) :rolleyes:.
 

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You can NEVER control the actions of other dogs and owners.

You can only control yours.

Train your dog to only follow your instructions. Train in OUT, or AUS---to leave an aggressive situation. With your dog trained to move out and stay---you will be free to handle the other dog.

Ranting/worrying about/fretting over what others do is tiresome and useless. You can only control what you and your dogs do.
 

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I have problems with several neighbors allowing their ankle bitters to run at large. They often come to my yard and start a fence fight ... I just call the Hooligans into the house and wait a while, then let them go back outdoors. To be honest I'd love to complain to A/C about the dogs (I've already complained to the neighbors involved) BUT I hate seeing dogs taken to the shelter when it's their owners I'd love to see punished.
 

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Work on your dogs focus and OB.

As others have said you can't control the situations around you but if you have your dogs trained to focus on you the situations become less relevant to them.

If you don't know the steps find a trainer that works on focus training, books and DVDs too. I like the Micheal Ellis series because he breaks it down step by step in a more methodical way using *mostly* positive methods in a way that I think is better for those of us new to this.

BTW- the prong doesn't create more aggression if used properly from what I have learned, it usually takes working with a good trainer to learn how to use prongs/corrections effectively and fairly....
 

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Similiar problem here and I wrote a letter to the HOA. Haven't heard anything back. I have very good fencing all around our yard, to keep our dogs in and small critters out too. However we saw an unknown small dog in the yard one day and kept our dogs up until it left. If all three of my dogs would have been out depends on how the little dog acted. They will and have killed squirrels and chipmunks so if it triggers their prey drive I don't know if I could save a dog that was small enough to squeeze into our yard unseen by me or my DH.

I have problems with several neighbors allowing their ankle bitters to run at large. They often come to my yard and start a fence fight ... I just call the Hooligans into the house and wait a while, then let them go back outdoors. To be honest I'd love to complain to A/C about the dogs (I've already complained to the neighbors involved) BUT I hate seeing dogs taken to the shelter when it's their owners I'd love to see punished.
 

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Getting Started
Contrary to what some people will tell you, training your dog is neither expensive or difficult, it will however require a little bit of investment on your part in the form of commitment to putting in the time and effort on a sustained basis to achieve your goals. In order to meet your training goals you will have to have the discipline in yourself to make it happen. You are not only training your dog-you are training yourself as well. You are a team, and how you handle yourself matters just as much as how you handle your dog--you are after all, coach and team captain.
Get the book "The Koehler Method of Dog Training" by William R. Koehler, published by Howell Books of New York. There are a lot of versions of training methods out there---and many of them are just so much fluff that will NEVER provide you with the tools you need to produce a first rate training job. Koehler has been around for about 40 years without change or revision--the reason is simple, there is no need to change or revise what works the best. If you cann't find a copy--order one. It is no longer in print, but you can find it either on used book auctions like Amazon.com, Ebay, Barnes and Noble, or you can use the link below this text to order a new one.
When you get the book, read through it first so that you have a good overview of what you will be doing. He is excellent about explaining what you do-why you do it that way-and why you don't do it any other way. Then you are ready to start. When you start--set yourself up with a training schedule-make out a daily and weekly checklist(a dry eraser bulletin board works great-or it can just be a large sheet of paper with days and times marked on it so that you can check off each session as you and post it in the most prominent place in your house. Stick to your schedule as much as you possibly can-it is important as much for you as for the dog. Re-read each exercise plan for the week as you start that week so that you will be refreshed on it and not miss something. Keep a log book of your goals, what you do, what the results are and any problems that may arise--THIS IS CRUCIAL. Just as any ship's captain keeps a log book, you can't know where you are or where you are going unless you know where you have been and where you are heading. Your log will be critical to you to go back and find where you have made a mistake and how to correct it if a problem should come up in the future.
Get the book, follow the schedule and log set up, do exactly what he tells you in the book in exactly the order that he presents it, and I guarantee that in about 4 months time you will have a dog that you can take anywhere under any conditions at all, off leash, and you will never have any problem. You will be able to take your dog to AKC obedience trials and earn a CDX title with no problem.
Good luck---although if you use the information I've given you, you will have no need whatever for "luck".
Koehler books can be ordered here:
http://www.koehlerdogtraining.com/bookstore.html


For your daily schedule and log I recommend the Cambridge DayRunner brand-the type with a daily and weekly schedule layout, and plain ruled pages in back for your log entries. I use the desk type size with ring binders the zip close leather case. The size is convenient and you will like the extra room as you start to use it for other areas of you life besides dog training(it is just time and focus management tools that you can apply to any area of your life). The ring binding allows you to add extra pages with ease(can be purchased separately)-and easily add or remove botched or outdated pages. For your wall board I like Boone Dry Erase Marker Board and Bycin Industries E-ZRASER organizer charts. Dry erase pens in a variety of colors will help you to pick out information quickly and easily when you start to get a lot of entries on your board and charts.
 

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Depends on the dog AND the person holding the leash.

In my experience with horses and now with dogs the 'stronger' the tools you use the more adviseable it is to get the help of a professional trainer experienced in the use of the tools.

I have seen incorrect use of prongs and e.collars backfire.

Dogs can and do redirect aggression/anxiety/fear (has nothing to do with the animal's intelligence) onto the handler improperly using these tools.

Better safe then sorry is my motto......
 
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