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I have three senior dogs: 13 year old lab, 10 year old lab, approximately 10 year old small terrier.

I love my vet, but he has been a bit slow, in my opinion, about realizing that the dogs don't need as many annual vaccinations as they used to think.

What is the Canine DA2PP vaccine? Is this for distemper and parvo? They have one of my labs due for it after receiving a three-year shot, but the terrier they say is due after one year. I have read somewhere that it is the same shot, so why three years for one dog and only one year for the other?

Apparently, they are also due for the Leptospirosis shot after one year. I feel this is important for my dogs to have, but unsure whether they need it every single year??

The rabies is, of course, by law, so I wouldn't consider letting them go without that one. But does anyone have opinions about whether senior dogs need all of these shots? I have also read that in many cases senior dogs don't need any more shots at all, ever. Thanks.
 

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They must be immune by now. Rabies, you have to follow the legal requirements. I don't give any shots after their first year. I am planning a titer after 5 years to check for immunity.
 

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Only rabies and DA2PP are on a 3-year cycle. Yes, that's the distemper and parvo shot.

The lepto booster is only good for 12 months (and full protection likely fades even sooner than that). If you have lepto in your area, it's one that I wouldn't skip -- if not caught quickly, it causes rapid kidney failure. Ask if your vet is seeing cases of lepto in dogs, in the clinic.

Rabies is available a 3-year shot. Your dog may still have immunity (and that could be checked with a titer), but in some states, you are legally required to get the shot anyway. You'll have to research your own state's requirements on that. We've had a thread recently about what the penalties for the dog can be for skipping it in places where it's required.

Bordatella is needed every 6 months if you board. Canine flu is an annual booster. That's one that you can also make a geographic decision on (if you are in the states that had the bad outbreak, or the contiguous states, you might consider it, but if you are several states away, maybe not).
 

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Only rabies and DA2PP are on a 3-year cycle. Yes, that's the distemper and parvo shot.

I thought DA2PP was quad cocktail of (1)distemper, (2)adenovirus-2, (3)parainfluenza and (4)parvovirus? Not just a Dist/Parvo?

You can titer for Distemper and Parvo and if testing shows sufficient coverage, you would not have to get them.
If one is sufficient and one is not after titer results......you can ask for a "single" vac.
 

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I agree, Rabies if required by law. My female lived to be 14 yrs and she only had her puppy shots...nothing after that but rabies. I do titer every year but at the end of her 14 yrs, she was still with good immunity. Anything else would really depend on where you live and what you do with your dogs. If they are in high wildlife areas then you may consider additional...but also checking that most vaccines given only cover a few strains. A good place to look is on mercola.com and look under "healthy pets" Dr. Karen Becker has numerous videos on vaccines...and by those testing who opt themselves to keep it to a minimum.
 

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I agree, Rabies if required by law. My female lived to be 14 yrs and she only had her puppy shots...nothing after that but rabies. I do titer every year but at the end of her 14 yrs, she was still with good immunity. Anything else would really depend on where you live and what you do with your dogs. If they are in high wildlife areas then you may consider additional...but also checking that most vaccines given only cover a few strains. A good place to look is on mercola.com and look under "healthy pets" Dr. Karen Becker has numerous videos on vaccines...and by those testing who opt themselves to keep it to a minimum.
We live in wild life area and I am sure the dog gets re-vaccinated all the time by natural ways.
 

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I was just saw today about vets going up against the government because of over vaccinating. I was at work so I didn't read it but I'm thinking it's about rabies since it's the government,
 

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I would titer and watch parvo immunities. I know someone who lost an 8 yr old GSD to parvo when they brought in a puppy from a shelter who died of parvo. Their dog had been immunized but not recently and apparently was not immune.
 

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Think I'm gonna have trouble with my husband, as I spoke to him about our old dogs not probably needing the distemper/parvo shot, and he is staunchly in favor of "whatever the vet says to do, we should do." In his defense, we do like our vet and he has never steered us wrong. I think I will at least argue that none of the senior dogs need it yearly.

I was reading the article linked in one response that talks about the vets insisting on the shots to keep us bringing our dogs in yearly, and that resonated with me as a truth. I also wonder if, since the evidence is mounting about the yearly shots being unnecessary, they are starting to use the heartworm test in the same way. I have lived in this state almost all my life and I know when we have mosquitoes and when we don't. I have never understood why, when I keep my dogs on the heartworm preventative all during mosquito season, they insist on giving the heartworm test yearly. Now they are refusing to sell us the preventative if we don't have the test, and I sort of resent it. And, in our state, you can't mail order it, so they are really holding us up.
 

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Think I'm gonna have trouble with my husband, as I spoke to him about our old dogs not probably needing the distemper/parvo shot, and he is staunchly in favor of "whatever the vet says to do, we should do." In his defense, we do like our vet and he has never steered us wrong. I think I will at least argue that none of the senior dogs need it yearly.

Both of my dogs had ONE parvo and ONE distemper (vet approved) when they were 16 weeks old, and they have never had another one.

They are now 10 1/2 and 9 and and their titers just came back as FULLY covered!

Get them titered and show proof to your Hubby!:wink2:
It's worth the extra $$$

Lifelong Immunity: Why Are Vets Pushing Back?


Moms :)
 

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I have never understood why, when I keep my dogs on the heartworm preventative all during mosquito season, they insist on giving the heartworm test yearly. Now they are refusing to sell us the preventative if we don't have the test, and I sort of resent it. And, in our state, you can't mail order it, so they are really holding us up.
AFAIK, that HW test is a requirement to issue a prescription in the entire U.S. I think it's FDA-mandated. No U.S. vet can sell you this prescription product without an annual HW test -- please don't resent your vet for following the rules. No legitimate mail order pharmacy in the U.S. will sell it without a vet RX either.

Here's why it's needed: HW meds fail sometimes. In my area of the U.S., we have a strain emerging that's resistant to prevention, and MANY people have experienced a "breakthrough" infection even when never missing a year-round dose. Even in areas without resistance, user-error is rampant (and even encouraged in a lot of well-meaning but mistaken Internet posts), and dogs reportedly sometimes turn up positive because of such user-error. You're already making a decision to give only part of the year (which is not recommended by the American HW Assoc., in part due to earlier and earlier mosquito emergence), so re-checking is simply prudent.

Since you trust your vet, you should have an open dialogue about your concerns, and take printouts of articles you'd like to talk about. Many vets want to know what clients are reading, so that they can help them sort out reliable sources from unreliable ones. Please give your vet the courtesy of that dialogue, since he's been there for you in the past. You may be astonished how open he is to your concerns.
 

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Vets also see very sick dogs. They don't see the dogs who are healthy and have high immunities. They see the ones where it fails. So they will usually side with the safest course, which is yearly or every three years, depending on the disease. Mine always give bordetella, but I no longer board, so I don't need it.
 

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The hw test is not law. Dispensing prescription med school without proper testing is. If a dog is having posted. And given the pills, it can kill them. Totally different topic than vaccines
 

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If a dog is having posted. And given the pills, it can kill them.
This used to be vet dogma, but the thinking on this is changing. There was a theory that the HW prevention products would cause a sudden microfilariae die off in HW+ dogs--and put the dog into shock. That's been debunked, as far as I know. I'm told by vets who work with a lot of HW+ dogs that there is a risk of that with a very high dose of ivermectin (i.e., the people who try to use cattle ivermectin on dogs and overdose the dog every month, or when dogs get treated for demodex at 200x the dose needed for HW prevention). At the ultra-low dose of the HW prevention products, though, most can be safely given to HW+ dogs, though some are better than others. They need to be on something prior to treatment so that they don't get new worms (and the AHA treatment protocol requires it). Knowing they're HW+ is likely to shift them to a different product than they might otherwise have gotten, though--at least with a HW-knowledgeable vet.

The risk of dispensing HW meds to HW+ dogs seems to be coalescing right now around the resistance problem. The reason we probably have resistance emerging in the Deep South is that ivermectin has been used for slow-kill treatment in HW+ dogs for decades down here, where most people can't afford immiticide treatment. The prevalence of slow-kill probably brought on the resistance.

I have a dim recollection that there was a push to get the FDA to make some HW prevention OTC, and remove the need for RX and testing. I believe that the paper that documented ivermectin-resistance came out about the same time, and that pretty well tanked the chance of the FDA loosening up these meds.
 

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I just want to say...I hate Autocorrect. I was not drunk-posting.

And no, my vet will not dispense medicine without running the test. Period.
 
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