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I'm curious, what medical and first aid supplies do you keep on hand for your dog?
I put together a first aid kit for dogs & humans. Easy to grab when we're going somewhere & everything is together at home. Things for the dogs include vet wrap, muzzle, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Imodium, digital thermometer with covers & lube, tick puller, nail clippers, eye wash, Neosporin, Vetrycin. I'm sure there's more but that's all I can think of at the moment.
 

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I started one after Jake had his rear legs re-aligned. I used a lot of J&J antiseptic wash, cortisone, Neosporin, cotton balls and gauze pads to keep it clean and help with the itching. He had staples from the top of his leg to the bottom. I've since added eye wash (the Bauch & Lomb kind) and ear cleaner (the dog kind). For Elke's paw infection I just used the J&J wash each time she came in on a clean towel or washcloth. I did pick up a foot washing cup by she was afraid on drowning in it AND it made her precious princess feet WET. the antibiotics did clear it up. I also have a spray antiseptic and benydryl in a tube for itchy things. And, yes, I have used the human hair clippers to find things under thick coats. (what ARE you chewing?!?!) You'll also want something to remove fleas and especially ticks. They have a drawer in the laundry where dog things are kept.

If you take your dogs into the woods or hiking, I had a friend who wished she'd had a snake bite kit with her. Her dog survived but it was scary getting him to help.
 

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Here in Arizona we get a lot of what they call 'goat head weeds' that can prick and get struck on the paw pads.
Sometimes numerous can get stuck at a time and they are hard to pick by hand so I have a pair of plastic tweezers at all times when we're out. I also have a band aid, small gauze, stypic powder on hand for walks. On hikes self adhering bandage on top of those. When we start going on strenuous hikes or going up mountains (which is probably years from now) I plan on taking boots, muzzle and maybe get this:

- -- has anyone ever had to use this product before?

So i can carry her on my back if i have to.
 

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Kwik Stop styptic powder
Pliers
Tick key
Tweezers
Neosporin
Vetericyn
Dog nail clippers
No-chew vet wrap, self clinging
Duct tape
Gauze
Endosorb (old school as heck, but I've found that it works).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Apart from the usual bandages and dressings, I have:
A pill cutter
Antiseptic powder
Chlorhexidine 4%
Colloidal silver
Betadine
Carprofen
Slippery Elm powder
Laxapet gel
Coloxyl
A can of Royal Canin Recovery

I will add Gas-X to my stash, something I hope I never have to use, in case of bloat.
 

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My understanding is Gas-X doesn't actually work for bloat. I would still use it but don't expect it to help.
 

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Well my house is pretty well stocked with all the first aide stuffs. But dog specific:
Kwik stop powder
rymadyl
Tick tweezers
nail clippers
zyrtec
benadryl
muzzle

My truck:
clean hand towel
gauze wrap and pads of various sizes
cohesive wrap
band aides/butterflies
ace bandages
bacitracin
burn ointment
needle nose tweezers
regular tweezers
surgical suture kit
peroxide
alcohol
betadine
wet wipes
nitrile gloves
tampons (great blood absorption)
maxi pads (make good pressure bandages and good blood absorbers as well)
tourniquet
scissors
mouth shield
instant ice pack
quick cpr reference guide
and I'm sure some other stuff

I don't keep/store pill type meds in my vehicle. It gets far too hot here in the summer for proper storage. I do however always have asprin and benadryl in my purse along with tylenol and motrin for humans too. I usually keep 1 or 2 20 oz. bottles of water in case I need to wash/clean a wound.
Most of my vehicle first aid stuff is geared more toward humans but I have treated minor dog injuries with those same items.
I also have a pet first aid app on my phone home screen

I should add eye wash
 

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Most of the supplies we have for the dogs are the same as those for us. Here's a list:
  • Tweezers
  • Aquaphor (ultra-refined Vaseline for scratches, minor wounds, and cracked elbow calluses)
  • Peroxide
  • Alcohol
  • Gauze
  • Lorazepam (Ativan anti-anxiety--for the vet)
  • Benadryl
  • Soft muzzle
  • Neosporin
  • Nail clippers
 

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For the past few years I don't travel without injectible cerenia, sucralfate and a bag of fluids. That would keep me from having to rush to some emergency clinic if my girl had an episode which I know how to handle.
 

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I learned the hard way to always travel with a few pills of an NSAID on road trips. My dog was fetching on a mountain meadow and hurt himself with an awkward jump that broke a toe. In that mountainous area, it took us time to find a vet that would see him and xray him. He didn't get pain meds until the vet saw him...which was a few hours. I would have really liked to have been able to take the edge off that pain for him, as I know it hurt.

Our regular vet now sends me off for the summer with a few "emergency" pills of carprofen in the right dose, along with some Metro in case we end up with a dog with giardia from swimming in mountain lakes.

I agree that Vetericyn/Puracyn is essential, for both dogs and people. Puracyn (the FDA-approved, human-grade version--same product, same strength, same manufacturer) is often cheaper than Vetericyn, so one bottle can serve in both the human and dog first aid.

I also share vet wrap with the dogs when there's a human injury requiring a dressing (the brightly colored generic, dog version is cheaper than the name-brand, beige human version sold at the drug store...but it appears to be the same rubberized stuff). Sterile gauze and Telfa (non-stick) pads can also help with wounds for either species (in fact, I would say Telfa pads are a must-have item). Same with generic Betadine (which is great stuff for cleaning out wounds...a shelter vet showed me that it's easy to dilute properly as long as you remember "looks like iced tea"). A needle-less syringe is also great to have around for flushing hard-to-wash wounds.

In a pinch, corn starch will stop an injured dog toe nail from bleeding. Stypic powder is faster, but the corn starch does work.
 

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I'm curious about the Gas-X thing. I had heard that it might not save the dog but could buy you some time to get to the vet. The nearest emergency vet to me is an hour away, so something that buys me time is important. But is that not true?
 

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I'm curious about the Gas-X thing. I had heard that it might not save the dog but could buy you some time to get to the vet.
That's my understanding as well. Our rescue actually distributed generic simethicone to our foster homes for emergencies at the vet's request -- she said it's very safe--and she was in favor of the dog's getting a dose while on the way to her in an emergency.
 
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