German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
While exploring the Internet, I've heard all sorts of flack about vets. Some don't position x rays correctly, some attempt to load their sponsors onto you, and some simply don't know what they are talking about. What, then, qualifies a good vet? How can the owner of the dog be sure that their doggie doctor is one the "good" ones and not a bad egg?

Feel free to list what to watch for and personal experiences
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
Difficult one, I guess word of mouth counts for a lot and I always think that vets need to keep up to date with new developments and treatments.

"bedside manner" is also important, I'm not a vet but I'm not an idiot either, I want to be told straight what's what and taken seriously when I seek help for my animals. Although I do accept that vets probably have to deal with a lot of neurotic owners!

Our practice has a locum that comes in sometimes and she has a really irritating habit of talking to the animals in a silly baby voice and worse still, using the SAME voice when she talks to the owners. It's so annoying I've had to ask not to see her again! Aside from the fact that she told me my GSD pup had a deformed jaw resulting in an underbite. In fact she was just growing and as her jaw has developed and her adult teeth have come in, she has developed perfectly. It annoys me though because I worried about it for a while and got a second (correct) opinion...

On the whole though I have had positive experiences with the vets I have dealt with and I am always very, very thankful to them. I'm sure it can be a difficult and challenging job!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,723 Posts
Gosh, if I were to post everything I wanted to on this topic, it would be the longest post ever.

So, for brevity's sake, here is the condensed version:

1) Must understand animals. Must understand body language and know how to approach an animal without scaring him before the exam even starts.
2) Must listen. I will repeat this: must listen. The owner knows his or her dog. No two dogs are alike. You can have two dogs with diarrhea and backgrounds totally different from another, so you just can't blanket treat.
3) Must be willing to treat conservatively, not just throw the strongest drugs at the dog. I love my vet because he knows Hans has a sensitive stomach, so he will try everything before giving antibiotics.
4) Must understand how vaccines work and how they can overwhelm the immune system. Must understand that not all dogs need every single vaccine that's manufactured.
5) Must be up-to-date on the latest research and methods.
6) Must be willing to try and find a cause, not just treat the symptoms.
7) Must be familiar with the different breeds and what diseases they can be prone to.
8) Must not be offended if owner needs to seek a second opinion.
9) Must be open to alternative methods.
10) Must be open to alternative ways of feeding, and not push stinkin' Science Diet.
Even better, knows about dog nutrition and the problems with feeding canines corn.
11) Must be familiar with how hormones affect growth and not push early neutering.

That's all I have for now.
I'm sure I'll add more as I think of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
990 Posts
I agree with some of Sunflowers posts but not all :D

For me the most important thing in a Vet is that they care and want to make a sick animal healthy again not just cash in. Those are the Vets that will call you after hours because they have done some research on your dogs puzzling symptoms not just thrown some tablets at you and sent you home.

The 2nd most important thing is a Vet that doesn't treat me like I'm wasting their time even if I call about something that's not life threatening. I don't want to be made to feel like an idiot, my Vet needs to trust me as much as I trust them - if I say there's something wrong I expect them to believe me.
3rd most important thing - a Vet that will refer cases that they feel are out of their expertise - a general Vet is like a human GP they that everyday issues - if something big crops up - refer. (having said that my vet does most surgeries and was prepared for a bloat surgery in the middle of the night a few weeks back when my female looked to be bloating)

The only way you find that in a Vet is by building a relationship with them. I live in a smaller country town and when I first moved I tried all the different vets in the area then stuck with the one I felt most comfortable with. (Actually i switched clinics after the first vet I really liked moved away).
Go to the clinic, talk to the staff, take the puppy for shots. Just see that you get a good feeling :) I'm on first name basis with all the clinic staff which makes life really easy :)
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top