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Discussion Starter #1
I have taught Place, Leave It, Wait, Off, Go, Back and a lot of other words. I keep seeing people talking about an Out command and I have no idea what that is. How did I miss it? I wonder if it's the same behavior I've taught using a different command and why none of our trainers either private or in classes, ever use it.
 

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I use it for him to literally get out of something, such as out of the car, out of the closet, "lets go OUT" accompanied by me putting shoes on. When I just put the shoes on without "out", he knows it's tough sh!tsky :laugh2: he stays to guard the house and looks at me with betrayed look behind the glass door... it's heartbreaking.. :( lol. For things like that.
He also knows "out" to let something out of the mouth when we play (or it's something he shouldn't have) and I have my hand on the object to let it go.

"Leave" I use when he just goes for something out on walks, or get's distracted and stares at something. Just to shift his attention away from the object.

Maybe I'm doing it all wrong though.. haha. But it seems to me the most fitting commands for situations. I was worried a little at first that he may be confusing "out" with too many meanings, but he is pretty clever boy and definitely uses other cues to figure out what want him to do at the time.
 

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Yes, "out" means release what is in your mouth. Usually used with bite work as the command to let go of the sleeve, suit or person. Also, it can be used to release a ball, toy or what ever else is in the dog's mouth.

In German it is "aus", in Dutch it is "Los", the translation to english is "out."
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Yes, "out" means release what is in your mouth. Usually used with bite work as the command to let go of the sleeve, suit or person. Also, it can be used to release a ball, toy or what ever else is in the dog's mouth.

In German it is "aus", in Dutch it is "Los", the translation to english is "out."
That is simpler than Drop it. By the time I say that, he has already moved on to something else. I'm using Leave it when I want him to ignore or not pick something up. This makes more sense.
 

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I have a drop it for non sport stuff because out needs to happen instantly or its wrong. It's a non formal command I nag them for. I also just no and correct a dog for picking up stuff I never want them messing with or at least not messing with unless told otherwise. Rolls of toilet paper/shoes/clothing items/etc. There is no point in continuing to tell a dog to drop stuff they shouldn't be picking up in the first place. Just correct them for picking it up.
 

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I have a drop it for non sport stuff because out needs to happen instantly or its wrong. It's a non formal command I nag them for. I also just no and correct a dog for picking up stuff I never want them messing with or at least not messing with unless told otherwise. Rolls of toilet paper/shoes/clothing items/etc. There is no point in continuing to tell a dog to drop stuff they shouldn't be picking up in the first place. Just correct them for picking it up.
Good point. I've been using drop it for toys when I throw them in the yard. It's just for play. I use leave it when I want to pull away their attention in advance, but my older dog will drop anything for the leave it command. I'm not going to change commands for her. The puppy is just now learning. I rarely use No, because I save that for very important things. My negative marker word is uh-uh when they almost have something right but not quite. It means try again.

My biggest challenge is getting other people to use the words I use. I have used Ok for a release word, but I need to remember to use something else because people say Ok all the time in regular conversation and release my dog accidentally when I don't want to.
 

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I use the two balls on a rope game to teach the out from a pup. I use "out" to get the dogs to drop toys or "out" a bite. I teach it with toys and proof it with a person in a sleeve or suit. It's all the same thing to me.

I do use "leave it" if the dog is going to pick up something it shouldn't. I also use "leave it" if the dog is about to pick up a toy I just told it to out. In sport or work, I have no issues with my dogs cleanly outing a suit, sleeve or a "live bite" if the suspect is relatively compliant. But, I rarely out my dog off a suspect that is not compliant or still combative.

One funny thing that I noticed yesterday was Boru, my new dog who is KNOV titled and trained in Dutch, dropped his toy when I said "out." It is progress as he was toy possessive and handler aggressive. I have been using "Los" with him, but Dutch is my third dog training language. My other dogs have always been English and / or German. Tonight, Boru was bringing his toy back, dropping it on the "out" and calmly allowing me to pick it up and continue the game. Sounds silly and trivial, but it is progress. I still haven't gotten bit yet, not hard at least. :)

"My biggest challenge is getting other people to use the words I use. I have used Ok for a release word, but I need to remember to use something else because people say Ok all the time in regular conversation and release my dog accidentally when I don't want to."

I use "OK" for a release, I had to remove that word from my vocabulary when I am working with my dogs. My dogs will not listen to anyone else, so that is not a problem. Your dog should be released by anyone but you, except maybe a family member. Certainly, not friends or strangers.
 

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I have a drop it for non sport stuff because out needs to happen instantly or its wrong. It's a non formal command I nag them for. I also just no and correct a dog for picking up stuff I never want them messing with or at least not messing with unless told otherwise. Rolls of toilet paper/shoes/clothing items/etc. There is no point in continuing to tell a dog to drop stuff they shouldn't be picking up in the first place. Just correct them for picking it up.
Dang! What is with them and that toilet paper?
 

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I use the two balls on a rope game to teach the out from a pup. I use "out" to get the dogs to drop toys or "out" a bite. I teach it with toys and proof it with a person in a sleeve or suit. It's all the same thing to me.

I do use "leave it" if the dog is going to pick up something it shouldn't. I also use "leave it" if the dog is about to pick up a toy I just told it to out. In sport or work, I have no issues with my dogs cleanly outing a suit, sleeve or a "live bite" if the suspect is relatively compliant. But, I rarely out my dog off a suspect that is not compliant or still combative.

One funny thing that I noticed yesterday was Boru, my new dog who is KNOV titled and trained in Dutch, dropped his toy when I said "out." It is progress as he was toy possessive and handler aggressive. I have been using "Los" with him, but Dutch is my third dog training language. My other dogs have always been English and / or German. Tonight, Boru was bringing his toy back, dropping it on the "out" and calmly allowing me to pick it up and continue the game. Sounds silly and trivial, but it is progress. I still haven't gotten bit yet, not hard at least. :)

"My biggest challenge is getting other people to use the words I use. I have used Ok for a release word, but I need to remember to use something else because people say Ok all the time in regular conversation and release my dog accidentally when I don't want to."

I use "OK" for a release, I had to remove that word from my vocabulary when I am working with my dogs. My dogs will not listen to anyone else, so that is not a problem. Your dog should be released by anyone but you, except maybe a family member. Certainly, not friends or strangers.
How do you teach them to drop something immediately if they want to hold onto it? My 7 month old doesn't like to give up toys. He will spit out a throw toy (I use various tug toys as throwing toys) if I have another one in my hand. But when I am ready to take the toys away and end the session, he will jump up and grab them out of my hand to keep playing. I'm working on how to correct that when he is unleashed in the yard and haven't come up with a solution.

How do you teach your dogs only to respond to a release command from family members or just from you? People always want to ask my dog to sit or shake or lie down, and then reward him for doing so in ways I wouldn't do myself. If he won't respond, then how do I leave him with someone else if we go on vacation?
 

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You mean they aren't supposed to grab a corner and unroll it all the way into the next room?
Mine run around the house with them in their mouths, better than toys!
 

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How do you teach them to drop something immediately if they want to hold onto it? My 7 month old doesn't like to give up toys. He will spit out a throw toy (I use various tug toys as throwing toys) if I have another one in my hand. But when I am ready to take the toys away and end the session, he will jump up and grab them out of my hand to keep playing. I'm working on how to correct that when he is unleashed in the yard and haven't come up with a solution.

How do you teach your dogs only to respond to a release command from family members or just from you? People always want to ask my dog to sit or shake or lie down, and then reward him for doing so in ways I wouldn't do myself. If he won't respond, then how do I leave him with someone else if we go on vacation?
I do not let anyone give my dogs commands. My wife can give commands in English, but she does not use the dog's German commands.

I do it in my obedience and teach my dog to ignore other people. I will set up an exercise with my dog in the "down stay" for example. I will then have some one else give him his release commands or call the dog. If the dog breaks, he is corrected for breaking the down stay. Opposition training works very well for this. Before I progress to other people trying to give my dogs commands, I proof the down stay by throwing toys and enticing him to break. Or working a second dog directly in front of the other dog in a down and letting the second dog literally run over the first dog chasing a toy. If your dog can handle those distractions and temptations then other people giving commands is easy for the dog to ignore.
 
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I do not let anyone give my dogs commands. My wife can give commands in English, but she does not use the dog's German commands.

I do it in my obedience and teach my dog to ignore other people. I will set up an exercise with my dog in the "down stay" for example. I will then have some one else give him his release commands or call the dog. If the dog breaks, he is corrected for breaking the down stay. Opposition training works very well for this.
Uh oh time to call ... dumb it down (Baillif) used to hear that a lot from me. :laugh2:

What is "Opposition training??"
 

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I use "Out" as described, something in your mouth drop it. And since I was a "Boxer" guy ... I also used "NO" a lot! Struddell heard "NO" so often ... I was worried she thought it was her name! :eek:

For us it meant "not now, not ever," she was always doing something new and different, that she ought not to be doing, worked out fine. My form of "crittering." :),
 

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I do not let anyone give my dogs commands. My wife can give commands in English, but she does not use the dog's German commands.

I do it in my obedience and teach my dog to ignore other people. I will set up an exercise with my dog in the "down stay" for example. I will then have some one else give him his release commands or call the dog. If the dog breaks, he is corrected for breaking the down stay. Opposition training works very well for this. Before I progress to other people trying to give my dogs commands, I proof the down stay by throwing toys and enticing him to break. Or working a second dog directly in front of the other dog in a down and letting the second dog literally run over the first dog chasing a toy. If your dog can handle those distractions and temptations then other people giving commands is easy for the dog to ignore.
Same here. In addition, I use a board so there are clear boundaries for the dog on placement. He knows not to come off the board.
 

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How do you teach them to drop something immediately if they want to hold onto it? My 7 month old doesn't like to give up toys. He will spit out a throw toy (I use various tug toys as throwing toys) if I have another one in my hand. But when I am ready to take the toys away and end the session, he will jump up and grab them out of my hand to keep playing. I'm working on how to correct that when he is unleashed in the yard and haven't come up with a solution.
You have to do a lot of repetitions with them so that the command itself is clear. If you've been using two toys, its probably better if you lose one for now. You can keep a leash on him and let him move around with the toy in a circle. Stop, tell him out and if he doesn't drop it, correct him.

If he's ignoring you at a distance like your describing in the yard, have a leash handy, calmly go to him, put the leash on so you can correct him, then take it off again. Make him think you can always leash him just like you can always reward him.

Don't end anything off leash right now. When he brings the toy to you, leash him, move around a little so you don't cause any conflict with him coming to you, and then out him and end it. Keep it all calm and relaxed.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I do not let anyone give my dogs commands. My wife can give commands in English, but she does not use the dog's German commands.

I do it in my obedience and teach my dog to ignore other people. I will set up an exercise with my dog in the "down stay" for example. I will then have some one else give him his release commands or call the dog. If the dog breaks, he is corrected for breaking the down stay. Opposition training works very well for this. Before I progress to other people trying to give my dogs commands, I proof the down stay by throwing toys and enticing him to break. Or working a second dog directly in front of the other dog in a down and letting the second dog literally run over the first dog chasing a toy. If your dog can handle those distractions and temptations then other people giving commands is easy for the dog to ignore.
I can try that. We are still far from working successfully with distractions, other than the dogs in his obedience class.
 
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