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The one thing I did not see addressed was running on pavement or concrete. We know it is harmful to humans, so I assume it is to dogs. I use those surfaces to wear down nails, but try to limit time on them.
 

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I think like anything it is a matter of being reasonable. In the study mentioned, they ran dogs on a treadmill up to 40 km per day. It's unlikely that anyone is running that far. Certainly jogging on pavement is harder on joints than the deck on a treadmill, but I would think running for 3 to 5 km on pavement is nowhere near as hard as running 40 km on a treadmill.

I also don't think there is a very good comparison between humans and dogs in this case. Humans are bipeds, so we have a lot of up and down movement. Dogs, trot much more smoothly than we do when we jog. At the speed I jog, my dog would be hardly working.

I don't run with my 7 month old pup, but I do think that the article suggests that a reasonable amount of exercise for healthy puppies is desirable and safe.
 

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Totally agree that exercise is needed and healthy. I always try to limit forced exercise or jarring. No jumping, etc.
 

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I think people see a "study" or hear something on the internet and take it to extremes. Let puppies be puppies. Avoid high impact if possible (I had to rearrange my furniture to keep Faren from launching off the top of the chair). No jumping. No excessive forced running. Let them run freely and play normally.

It's really no secret how detrimental high impact is to young joints. Just go talk to gymnasts and cheerleaders who started as toddlers.
 

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I just operate on the idea that puppies should do what they'd do without human intervention. This means jumping over or on rocks, stumps, logs, or random puppy-sized objects. Running hard on grass, gravel, sand, pine straw, dirt, mud. Chasing moving objects (whether thrown or rolled). Tugging an item with another pack member. Rolling around and being silly. Splashing in water (maybe even swimming).

None of that will hurt a puppy very much, especially if you just pay attention to when they're tired and help them go rest. That will generally prevent too much overworking.
 

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The example of cheerleaders and gymnasts is a great example. Because being small is advantageous to gymnasts, they often peak before their teen growth spurt. I am going to check out the literature.
 
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