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I didn't put this in the aggression thread, because I'm now convinced that Midnite isn't being aggressive when he sees other dogs. Wasn't so sure, but now I am. Today my son took my female GSD for a walk, so I took Midnite outside to play with his soccer ball. They were coming around the corner after about 30 seconds of us being out there. Midnite acknowledged them, knew it was then, but he still went on a barking spree when he seen Robyn(female GSD) on the leash. They were about 20 feet from us and he was using his menacing bark and hackles up. He actually wrapped himself around the pole in his frenzy. I removed him from the situation, but I'm now considering using any one of my dogs to help train him. They are all very stable and would not go after him if he approached them in their face. How can I go about this? Walk past them? Have the dogs walk toward each other, but not close enough to interact Teach him to go for the butts to sniff instead of the face? Any ideas? I think this could work to snap him out of this, especially if he's doing it to his own and he loves all of them.:help:
 

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"They were about 20 feet from us and he was using his menacing bark and hackles up. He actually wrapped himself around the pole in his frenzy."

He is aroused and fearful of your own dog?
From what I recall about Midnite he is a handful , and that his excitability when it comes to other dogs is at quite a distance - 20 to 30 feet , when with most the zone is closer .
I don't know if you can change this behaviour so you will have to manage it . A dog without a solid recall and this excitability , which may have the other dog react to him with aggression, needs to be kept on leash.
 

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"They were about 20 feet from us and he was using his menacing bark and hackles up. He actually wrapped himself around the pole in his frenzy."

He is aroused and fearful of your own dog?
From what I recall about Midnite he is a handful , and that his excitability when it comes to other dogs is at quite a distance - 20 to 30 feet , when with most the zone is closer .
I don't know if you can change this behaviour so you will have to manage it . A dog without a solid recall and this excitability , which may have the other dog react to him with aggression, needs to be kept on leash.
None of my dogs are ever off leash. He is best friends with the GSD. They sleep, play and eat together, so it was odd that he reacted this way. He was definitely excited and its okay for him to be, but he needs to learn how to go about it different. If I would have approached her with him, he would have kissed her and tried playing. We have gone to one class(will continue to do so every week) and he did well with dogs at about 10-15 ft from him..only issue was a dog that ran up to him and I tightened the leash, completely my fault. He is coming around nicely in most places..he has gotten really good with the cats, he doesn't bark at them at all anymore. I feel that if I got him that way with the cats, I can get him to ignore dogs. Thats my goal and I am able to use my own dogs, none of which react at all to the other dogs.
 

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The answer I'd normally give is longer than I can write up in a post (and I write some long posts!) but Patricia McConnell's booklet Reactive Rover may be useful in answering some of the questions you've posed, if you haven't already seen it. On the other hand, it may just tell you more of what you already know.

Jean Donaldson's booklet Fight! is also good, and not too lengthy, but perhaps not 100% applicable to your situation as you've described it (really it's just one particular section I'm thinking of that could be useful, roughly 15 pages long; that said, the diagnostic sections may be helpful in determining what exactly you're dealing with). Also, it's written more for professional trainers than lay owners, so it can be pretty heavy on the jargon, and not all its suggestions may be practical for you. Still, with those caveats, it is another resource that you may find useful.

Sorry, I know you didn't ask for book recommendations! But I think trying to lay out a step-by-step protocol would be beyond me to post, particularly as I've got to run in a minute. Game of Thrones finale coming on! :)

I'm really glad to hear you're seeing progress with the cats, btw.
 

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Are you positive he recognized the other dog as his playmate? Has he been to the vet? I'd check his eyes...
 

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No advice, but a question:

At that very moment, what do you think Midnght would have done if you unleashed him?

I've seen Kira get her hacks up, and go into a frenzy at a passing dog or person walking past my home. Knowing she has a solid recall, I actually opened my front door one day to give her a better look. I knew I could stop her, if she took off.
As soon as I opened the front door, she had the "freedom" to see what excited her, she stopped. She walked out the front door, and just got a better look. hacks went down, and the barking stopped.

I'm wondering if there's a higher anxiety because Midnight was frustrated at being leashed, and restricted, and not being with your son and the other dog?
 

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I didn't put this in the aggression thread, because I'm now convinced that Midnite isn't being aggressive when he sees other dogs. Wasn't so sure, but now I am. Today my son took my female GSD for a walk, so I took Midnite outside to play with his soccer ball. They were coming around the corner after about 30 seconds of us being out there. Midnite acknowledged them, knew it was then, but he still went on a barking spree when he seen Robyn(female GSD) on the leash.
I haven't read any previous threads so I'm not quite sure exactly what you are trying to do but is midnight ball motivated at all? If so stick a kong in his mouth. Can't bark, can't bite. Works wonders. If he's not aggressive just over excited this gives him something else to do.
 
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