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Black and white photo, hard to tell. Can you get a better, color picture of the puppy?
 

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Your photo shows up in color for me. The puppy is Blue & Tan (also possibly a long coat)…there are colors that are more rare, but no, blues are not that common. It’s a fault within the GSD breed as mentioned above. Along with Livers, depending on the shade, sometimes less than reputable breeders will market them as “lilac” or “isabella” or “steel”, terms that are borrowed from other dog or cat breeds that come in diluted colors.

Similar puppy…
 

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Definitely blue. It's not a color reputable breeders strive for since it's a fault in the breed. Blue is a dilute color and is recessive. This gene "dilutes" black to blue.

Liver is not a dilute. It come thru a different gene that creates brown instead of black. It's also recessive so both parents have to carry a copy of it. Isabella is a dilute of Liver.

We're learning all sorts of things now that genes are being researched :) Blues also carry a higher chance of skin disorders.
 

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I agree , l years ago I bred and shown Dobermans Pinchers.
If that pup had shorter hair he would look like a blue Doberman, which is a fault . Any with that color came with a host of health issues.
Unfortunately so called breeders thought is was a money making color and advertised them as unique color . And they bred them and received top dollar for them . And then they started breeding these monster size Dobermans the standard for males are 26”to28” and females 24”to 27” unknowledgeable people would ask why my dogs were small , they wanted sizes like a Great Dane or St. Bernard , I just smiled and tried to explained the standards etc . . Some people look for difference in any breeds faults and all , just to say the own this “unique “ dog .
Knowledge is the best tool for new dog owners
Read read and read some more about the breed of dog you are interested in .
 

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If Little Regann is his name, he's a cute little guy and deserves a good home and a lot of love. I would not be over-concerned about genetic diseases -- ALL German Shepherds are at risk for a LOT of genetic problems. If it is something that is concerning, look into pet insurance so that you won't have to make health decisions mostly by the financial aspect. But, as I said, I would say that for any GSD that you might buy.

Yes he is blue and tan, and yes that is just a washed out black and tan. There is a gene for color and that gene that is dominant in your pup is black and tan. But there is another gene that determines pigment and your dog's pigment is diluted. For show strong pigment is desired which includes a predominantly black nose. A blue will have a grey nose and paw pads and eye rims.

Is it rare? Well we hope it would be, because good breeders would not breed a dog with the gene if they know it is there. Because gray and brown noses are a disqualifying fault in the show ring. Unscrupulous breeders who breed for current fads in dogs, usually aesthetics only, they will breed such dogs, because they think they can make a buck on them for them being unique. I am curious as to why people are so enamored by having a dog that is in some way, rare. They want rare breeds, rare colors and markings, even if what makes them rare is directly linked to a detrimental health issue. People used to say the white ones are likely to be deaf, which has been debunked but is true I think in Dalmations. But that never stopped folks from wanting the white ones. They have a following and now a new name. The livers are rare because that color is connected to some disease and their longevity is usually not good.

The blues are not as rare as we should hope really. A solid black becomes a solid blue when it is a dilute and people ooh and ah over them as if they never saw a dog before. A pattern blue/blue and tan is not as striking I guess, so while they are probably more populous than a solid blue, we hear less about them. If a blue or blue/tan shows up in a litter of pups, it should be given to a buyer at a discount because of the disqualifying conformation fault, where people actually get taken by that rare--baloney. But that's not the puppy's fault. He doesn't give two wits about his coloring. His personality is what is important. Enjoy your pup. Play with him. Train him. Do stuff with him, and his coloring his size -- every other aspect of him falls into place.
 
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