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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m just curious about what my German sheppie looks like? The breeder my boyfriend got him from said my dogs dad was imported from Germany and that’s his mom was a German Shepherd from here. I was wondering if he matches what they said? I’m not well versed and I wasn’t able to ask questions since he was a gift. Any input would be appreciated. He jus turned nine months and he got him at 3 almost 4 ish months. I’ll attach pictures, he’s a red and black sheppie. Also his none is kinda slanted which I find odd I’ve had gsd in the past and I ve never seen it. I do remember somebody telling me his back was higher than his front when he was smaller but she said he would grow out of it most likely and I think maybe he did?
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Definitely looks purebred, but not well bred. He certainly could be a cross between German show lines (black and red dogs) and American show lines. It's really impossible to know without a pedigree, though.
 

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He looks pure to me, nothing about him would make me question if he’s got something else mixed in. Handsome dude too!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Definitely looks purebred, but not well bred. He certainly could be a cross between German show lines (black and red dogs) and American show lines. It's really impossible to know without a pedigree, though.
Yeah he doesn’t really jump his hips seem a bit weak. He was more sickle hocked when he was smaller. How would I get the pedigree? Is that his AKC paper?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
He looks like he could be a German showline, American showline cross. I don’t see any reason to think he’s not a German shepherd.
I actually do remember now that you say that he told me that his dad was a show line dog, Im just curious about his background. I’m kind of new to all the terms and I didn’t know he was a red gsd until not too long ago I thought he was yellow lol
 

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Red, yellow, silver, tan, orange. All descriptive terms that relate to the same genetic color, its just various degrees of pigment. He looks to me like the basic pet stock mish mash. Typically the German SL dogs have very rich pigment that looks really reddish.
As someone else said, purebred most likely but not necessarily well bred. Either way enjoy your dog.
 

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I want to just say that we are over-using the term well-bred. The OP seems to know his/her dog is a mixture of lines. It is hard to hear that your dog is not well-bred, even if you suspect it. The thing is, the only way you can determine how "well-bred" a dog is, is if you are coloring within the lines. Everything outside of the lines is going to appear to be not well bred because it is not going to be a perfect representative of one particular line. But some of the best breeders have gone outside of the lines to introduce a trait or traits they felt lacking in their own lines. The immediate progeny of this pairing are not going to be what anyone will call well-bred, but taking the best of them and breeding back into the lines we can start to come back to what we like best, hopefully capturing some of what we went outside to find. Certainly this is not for everyone. But this aside is just to say that the dog is considered not well-bred solely because people cannot identify the dog as any specific line. If the dog was clearly one line or another line, then the dog would be not be well-bred. And some of us might want to see the pedigrees that would produce the dog within the lines. Two very good dogs could have produced the above dog.

What I see is a dog who is alert, inquisitive, playful, and attached to its people. Love that puppy. He is awesome!
 

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I really dislike to hear when ppl say “not well bred” based on a picture of a pup. To me not well bred means a dog with a deficiency in temperament, not a resemblance to a particular line. Do we really have so many pedigree, conformation and lines experts on this board right now? It’s not very evident but we love to tell a new person “your dog is not well bred but, well, enjoy your dog anyway.”
 

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I really dislike to hear when ppl say “not well bred” based on a picture of a pup. To me not well bred means a dog with a deficiency in temperament, not a resemblance to a particular line. Do we really have so many pedigree, conformation and lines experts on this board right now? It’s not very evident but we love to tell a new person “your dog is not well bred but, well, enjoy your dog anyway.”
I agree that temperament is a primary part of conformation, and a dog having storm phobias, shyness, fear aggression, timidity in the face of a threat, or other character flaws can be or is evidence of bad breeding, so not well-bred. But that you cannot see in a picture. So I focused on the other parts of conformation, and how dogs represent the various lines. GSDs have such a variance between working and show, and the variety of working lines and show lines, that it is hard to know sometimes if a dog is actually all GSD. I am thinking that the variance in structure is probably similar to the variance in temperament. And I think coloring outside of the lines is done as much for character traits as for improving structure.

I just wish we would be more careful on how we describe other people's dogs.
 

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I really dislike to hear when ppl say “not well bred” based on a picture of a pup. To me not well bred means a dog with a deficiency in temperament, not a resemblance to a particular line. Do we really have so many pedigree, conformation and lines experts on this board right now? It’s not very evident but we love to tell a new person “your dog is not well bred but, well, enjoy your dog anyway.”
Not looking down on any dog. Stating facts. Even to my eye he has poor conformation based on breed standard. However as I own probably the worst bred dog on this forum I certainly feel comfortable to point out that even dogs not well bred certainly deserve loving homes.
 

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Agree with Sabis. Most of my dogs have been rescues, with so-so conformation. Doesn't mean I didn't love them with all my heart.

And there's nothing wrong with crossing the lines, if it's done for a reason. I've known many ASL breeders who did just that to improve conformation and temperament. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. Star was a cross between American and German show lines, and had pretty nice conformation, though not nice enough to be a show dog. I've seen other dogs where the cross produced a female with the worst features of both lines.
 

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I’m seeing a mix of all three lines perhaps. The owner will have to tell us how well bred the dog is based on his temperament. A beautiful dog by the way.
 
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