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I took Kodee for a walk for about 50 minutes today. It was about 90 degrees, and very humid. We stopped and I let him have ice water, and he drank quite a bit. He was panting super-fast, so I took him in a store into the AC. I put him in a down on the hard wood floor, and just waited a while (maybe 15 minutes) for him to cool down and start breathing a little more easy. After 15 minutes, he's still panting super-fast. Way faster than "normal panting" in my mind. So I take him back to our car (about 5 minutes away, if that. He drinks more ice water, and I turn the AC on high, all vents aimed on Kodee. His breathing hasn't slowed down at all from what I can tell, 15 minutes later. So I call my "new" vet, and tell the receptionist what's going on (nothing really other than super-fast panting, longer than I would expect to be normal). She says they just had an emergency come in, and she'd have to try to ask someone and call me back later. Uh, NO.
If he's got heat exhaustion, I need to know asap, so I can bring him in or do whatever needs to be done for him now. So she says "I'll try to call back as soon as I can." Ugh! Now I'm po'ed, but whatever. While I'm waiting for a call back, I call my old vet. Same question. This time the receptionist puts me on hold to ask, then gets back on the phone and says "Uh, panting, and maybe collapse?" WTH? She even said it like she was asking me! First off, it's July - my dog pants a lot. So that's not real helpful, I need more specifics. Secondly, I'm calling so that I can find out if something's wrong BEFORE Kodee collapses. Yikes!

So I decide to just keep an eye on him, and take him to the vet if his breathing doesn't slow down soon. I take him in the pet store, put him in a down on the cold linoleum, and wait. Finally after about 10 or 15 more minutes, his breathing starts to slow down to normal. Still panting, but not so darn rapidly. Since we've been home, he's been on the cool linoleum in the AC, and I haven't let him be outside at all except for quick potty breaks. He's been fine all afternoon now. Thank goodness!

So, since I couldn't get a vet to do it, can you guys please tell me What are the symptoms of heat exhaustion, and what do you do if you think that's what's going on with your dog?


Also, does it sound like something really was going on with Kodee, or was I just overreacting?
 

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OOH! that is scary...sorry your vets office was not very helpful.


Glad Kodee is doing better.


I thought you had to give cool water not ice, since that delays cooling? I could be wrong. Hope others have more experience.
 

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Start with these symptoms.
How many apply?

1. If your dog is staggering around like a drunk.
2. Does your dog seem weak but still restless?
3. His panting is heavier than normal and might have a slight rasping sound to it.
4. Does he seem extremely anxious with a delirious expression on his face?
5. Check his temperature for a fever higher than 104°F.
6. Check his mouth and look for inappropriate salivation.
7. Check his skin, it may be very warm to the touch as well is dry.
8. He may also start sessions of diarrhea and vomiting as well
http://www.ohmydogsupplies.com/news/81/how-to-spot-the-signs-of-heat-exhaustion.html



-When your dog staggers instead of walking properly.

-When he pants more than usual, with a slight rasp.

-When he looks overtly anxious with a delirious expression.

-Warm skin as well as dry.

-Weak and restless behaviour.

-Having a temperature of over 104°F.

-Watch for inappropriate salivation in his mouth.

-Diarrhea and vomiting symptoms.

http://ezinearticles.com/?How-To-Tell-If-Your-Dog-Is-Suffering-From-Heat-Exhaustion&id=542382


Also, look for gums to become a muddy pink and ears to be flushed. That's when things are getting serious.


This is the best article I found, but I'll summarize so you don't have to read the whole thing:

TO TREAT:

Brushing the coat might help (it removes fur and lifts the fur),

pack with cool towels and/or rinse with water,

give him water to drink not ice or ice water (which can shock the system),

hold ice packs around his head and neck,

put him in front of a fan.

Don't immediately take to the vet because transport may be harder on him than just letting him cool off in a nice safe cool place.

Once the dog’s temperature is reduced, and the dog is cooled, you may seek the advice of a vet to verify organ damage did not result from the incident.

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article...l?page=2&cat=53

Give cool water, not ice.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, everybody. The links are great. I feel bad that I gave him ice water, but I actually had that for him in the car before he got overheated. next time I'll get cool water instead. Hopefully, there won't be a next time. No more walks that long in hot weather. I feel so bad. Thank God he's ok. I'd never forgive myself if something happened to him, esp. if it was because of something I did/didn't do.

Thanks again for the help. I e-mailed my vet directly, to let him know about my concerns (i.e. "complain!!!!
) about the response I got (or lack thereof) from his staff today. I'm sure he'll make sure it doesn't happen again. I hope.
 

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First, I'm glad to hear your dog is better. I don't think its possible to over-react when it comes to our pets. I'm sorry but if I feel like its a problem then its a problem. I know my dogs better than anyone else and I know if something is going wrong. Again, I'm glad your boy is better.
 

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The signs I primarily look for are the following: heavy panting, stressed / uneasy expression, red/flushed ears, dark pink/red tongue (or tongue that is looking "swollen"), and heavy salivation and/or pale gums.

If you're out exercising in the heat, make sure your dog drinks cool water but not frozen / ice water because that's not very healthy. There are electrolyte replacement tablets and poweders for dogs that you can drop in the water, which work quite well (just like the ones for people) and are great for adding to the water when exercising in summer.

You can also use a squirt bottle to wet down the inside of the legs, belly, and the sides of the chest to help cool him. With a lot of fur, ruffle the fur with your hand while squirting the water, so it will get to the skin.

If you're already suspecting heat stress / heat issues, have your dog rest in a shady area - preferably one that is open and has plenty of ventilation. It will take awhile for a dog that is already showing symptoms of heat stress to cool down, so expect to cool him and have him rest for a decent amount of time. Use water to cool his back legs, tummy, and chest. If you carry rubbing alcohol, you can use rubbing alcohol for cooling. It evaporates much faster and with higher humidity in the air than plain water will!
 

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Originally Posted By: Lola1969It's very hot right now where I live and I find 30 minutes (when he normally prefers an hour) is just enough for my coatie. I think if you cut down the walk time in the summer it will probably lessen your anxiety.
Ditto. I don't think your original post mentioned what time of day you took Kodee out for his walk. It has been very hot/humid this week here so I only take Sean out early in the a.m. or later in the p.m. I find that helps decrease the possibility of heat exhaustion. I hope Kodee is feeling better today.
 

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They also make cooling vests for dogs to help prevent heat exhaustion and allow them to be outdoors for longer when it is hot and humid. I recently bought this one for Luca and am impressed with how well it seems to work. Stays cool for 2-3 hours--except, I have discovered, if the dog wears it swimming--then the cool packs thaw quickly and it loses its mojo. I keep it in the fridge crisper drawer and it's always ready to go. (P.S.--I have no connection to this company.)

http://www.helpingudders.com/CoolingVests.htm
 

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I am impressed - my vet actually apologized, and said that what happened was inexcusable. He asked me to give their clinic a second chance to give Kodee and I the service that we "deserve." I usually don't say anything when I'm dissatisfied w/someone's service, but when it comes to either my kids or my dog, I am the squeakiest wheel out there.
It's nice to know that our vet took my concern seriously.
 

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I second Luca's suggestion for the cooling vest. This is the same vest I have for Abby. It was part of a couple of cooling products we tested about a year (or two years? I forget) ago and this is the only one we kept. I also keep the cool packs in the crisper in the fridge and they're always ready to go when we need them. It's expensive but so worth it.
 
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