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I hate to say it but this dog has been 5x the hassle than he's worth. I understand SOME biting, chewing and general shenanigans from pups but from 8 weeks til now at 18 months old but he has ravaged my house and backyard at every opportunity given. This morning, I come downstairs to find my plastic tupperware in the back yard he had chewed up, again. I think it's time to give him up. I know of NO other dog owners who go through this. He is absolute **** and it wouldnt be AS bad if I didnt have to worry about him chewing up the siding on my house which he has taken to now. I literally would never in a million years gotten a GSD if I had known they are like this and cause absolutely destruction to your house. I would post pictures but all in all, he's easily caused over $3000 in damages (siding, flooring, electric lines he dug up, tools, couch, tupperware, chewed up my bed, etc etc)

Some people luck out & get PERFECT dogs while I get the worst behaving you can just about find. I think it's time to give him up. Absolutely no way I'll endure this for another 18 months while he "comes around."

So my question is, who here has surrendered the GSD & how did you feel afterwards
 

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You aren’t going to find the answer you want to hear, not here at least. Everything you’ve stated sounds like an unsupervised, untrained, and potentially very bored GSD. They are a highly intelligent and active breed that require a lot more than “get lucky, have perfect dog.”

At this point you sound as if your mind is made and it really does sound that this is not a proper fit for you.

Please look into GSD rescues near you and even let the forum know your location if you’d like help finding a good reputation rescue that can give this dog the best chance he can get. There are very knowledgeable people on this forum that can help you make that decision.

That said, if you are wanting to pursue changing this behavior, you need to consult a professional trainer.
 

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I doubt anyone here has surrendered their dog. There are no perfect dogs. There are only trained dogs. It sounds like a young German Shepherd was left loose and to his own devices so entertained himself. I'm not really going to address your post since you posted a year ago about destructive behavior issues in the house so it sounds like he is now living outside, and the dog going to a new home should be focused on as that's what you seem to want.

You need to do what is right for you and for the dog. No judgement there. Where are you located at? Many people here can recommend rescues or possibly help until a spot in a rescue becomes available.
 

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I agree with both above posters - this sounds like a bored, unsupervised dog. What have you done to keep him entertained and exercised? From you first thread a year ago, it looks like he was uncrated...n untrained, bored, under exercised dog will be destructive. Please, find a good rescue or if the breeder is willing to take him back, give him back. Not all dogs are the same. Just because your Aussie could stay out of a crate, doesn't mean the next dog will.


My advice - give up the dog to a good home/rescue or back to the breeder and if you do choose to get another dog, go for an older dog.
 

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From someone that ventured into owning a GSD with little to no knowledge of the breed, researching the characteristics and behaviors of these dogs, helped me understand and be prepared for what lay ahead (to some extend); and even with that work done ahead of time, it has been trying to say the least. The word FIT is important, when one is deciding this type of life commitments; and it seems that this GSD, is NOT a FIT to your lifestyle nor expectations. Indeed find him a good home, and if you decide to venture into dog ownership again, please remember that not all dogs are the same, and that within the breed, there are different drives that are genetically inherited; and if you end up with a high drive dog when you thought you were getting a layed back house pet, its not going to end well for both you and the animal.
Owning this wonderful breed requires a commitment from the prospective owner, to do everything in its power to provide a stable environment of support, exercise and mental stimulation; so this new family member can thrive and reward his new pack with a lifelong of wonderful interactions and memories, which will give you back 10 fold what you put in it.
 

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A year ago almost exactly you did not like this dog. We tried to give you advice and point you in the right direction, but you never responded. Your very first post here was about the $3000 you had wasted on the puppy.
Now here you are 1 year almost to the day later complaining about $3000 worth of damage. And here we all are telling you exactly the same things. Supervise, train and exercise. These dogs take work and not even a lot, just some and some common sense.
My Dane puppy did way more damage then any Shepherd I have ever met, the list of things she ATE is astounding! The list of things she destroyed is even more so, and included the very expensive crate that I was assured would hold a wild animal. It lasted ONE DAY!
My Dobe cross turned my backyard into something that looked like a moonscape, and my first Sheltie was so hard to start that I very nearly gave up.
FIVE of my German Shepherds thought fencing was fun to climb and caused me endless grief and expense and my Wolfhound cross thought window glass was meant to be jumped through. Do you have any idea how expensive windows are?

I think you need to rehome this dog, I think you should have done it a year ago. Tell us where you are located and I am sure someone can point you to a reputable rescue or someone who might be able to take on this dog.
 

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Please rehome your dog responsibly or return him to the breeder if that is possible. There's no shame in rehoming your dog as long as you ensure his well-being and safety. Though some breeds are easier than others, I've never had a dog that was born perfect. If left to their own devices, most dogs do what comes naturally to them like digging, barking, and chewing, particularly when they are bored or isolated. As a working/herding breed, GSDs need training, exercise, boundaries, companionship, rules and structures, some more so than others. My GSDs did not do much damage in my home, most likely because I did not give them the opportunity. The few times they have damaged something were due to my carelessness.
 

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The simplest things are the easiest and most common sense. Protect your things by not allowing your dog access to them. My dogs earned the privilege of being out of their crates. They were 'tested' periodically, for short periods, to see if they were ready to be out of the crate. If not - back in the crate. I do not allow my dogs outside unattended, They have a designated area to go potty. They are not allowed to pee/poop in my garden. There are areas of the yard they are not allowed to play. That is reinforced by me being there, to correct them.

Physical and mental exercise is so important. Obedience is so important. Dogs to not exercise or train themselves. That is your job. If you cannot, or do not wish to train your dog, please find him a loving home with someone who will. Your dog deserves better.
 

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Dogs can’t do that type of damage if they are supervised. My current GSD has only chewed up one dog bed in his crate because he got overheated. That’s the extent of the damage he’s caused me since he was 8 weeks old...and he just turned two. Why? Because I watch him like a hawk. And if I can’t, he’s crated. He’s still crated while I go to work because I have an elderly dog that he plays too rough with. Crating him keeps them both safe.

Honestly, it doesn’t sound like you want to put in the effort with him. It also doesn’t sound like you have a bond with him. I would call a rescue organization and have him re-homed. While they are a challenging breed, they are ridiculously smart and easy to train with the right person.

Good luck to you.
 

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The one I feel sorry for here is the dog. He's just a dog. A lot of dog, being a lot of dog. It sounds like he's in the wrong home. Maybe the OP will feel relief when the dog is rehomed, maybe the OP will feel sad. The home sounds very wrong for this dog. The dog's made no mistake, sometimes humans can learn from their errors.


I picked up a stray pup at a park. My older dog was having none of it. I took the stray pup to the humane society. They claimed he had kennel cough and were going to put him down. I reclaimed him and found him a home. The boy loved the dog - his mother wasn't so keen but agreed to it. The last I knew, it was a happy outcome but I wonder from time to time how it turned out. So - to the OPs question about your feelings - I felt responsible, I reclaimed the dog (with a tussle with the humane society), I then placed the dog. And I've wondered about that placement.. What did I feel? Sorry that I couldn't keep him but I knew that he had a better life for however long he was with that boy than had he been euthanized for non-existent kennel cough. So I had mixed feelings about it.
 

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"I am this close to giving mine away because of house destruction
I come home, today he has ruined the corner of a brand new hide-a-bed.
Each day i come home he has the trash scattered everywhere
Two expensive power tools he's chewed right through the cord
Ruined the corner of my wooden bed. it looks terrible now.

He's purebread, six months old and I am at my wits end. The couch this morning just set me off. I thought getting a dog would be all glamorous. Our old Aus. Shepherd was great. Nothing like this. He was pretty much autonomous. Never chewed anything other than his bone or a piece of wood.

Im afraid that after i let him go, I will think there goes the $3,000 he's cost (in vet visits, hospital bill from parvo, crate, food, etc) me right down the drain. But honestly he is a royal pain in the you know where.

Maybe this could be overcome if he acted like other dogs. IE, laid with their owners. Didnt bite them all the time. He doesnt lay with me, or on me. Constantly tries to bite me playfully. Doesnt like dog treats, will only eat human food & dog food.

I just do not know if i can take this any more. I hate to say it, but if I could go back in time & choose not to get him knowing what I know now, I absolutely positively without-question, would not have gotten him"

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I'm just quoting your first thread since this thread bares the same frustrated feelings and to justify my question of how you could have withstood all of that frustration without any sense of enjoyment for so long? Do you have any stories of what you taught and how that success helped you in this past year? Why did you continue to wrack up more damage expense for another year?

To be fair to all, it is reasonable to assume that a human is going to feel something at the moment of surrender no matter how they felt about the dog while it was still theirs. That said, is it fair to pose a question and expect a member to open old emotions and reply when 3 pages of previously helpful suggestions were not responded to? No judgement from me, just asking a fair and honest question as it seems this thread is just asking what the emotions were at the time of surrender. Nothing more.

Again, no judgement just how I see things.
 

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Could be hard to place a totally untrained, probably undersocialized young adult GSD... hope it all works out for the best.

If this is a purebred dog, please return him to the breeder. Any decent breeder will assist with rehoming or take the pup back until a home is found.

Dogs do indeed destroy stuff given a chance- because they are dogs. Some of it you train, but it's usually easiest to contain or crate the dog if you can't watch him/her. Exercise helps with yard destruction, but in my experience does nothing to reduce counter surfing or chewing unwanted items. That you either need to manage (keep dog and items separate) or watch and consistently trade/train and or correct. Most do grow out of it at 2-3 years old. But not all.

If you want to keep this dog, now is the time to seek the guidance of an experienced trainer.
 

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In 20 plus years of owning this breed, I have never had a PERFECT dog! Whether it's chewing out electrical sockets before I get near the front door, attempting to maim the vet or hating every dog on sight (Not the same dog!!) They have all had their issues. There is no shame in rehoming your dog as long you do it responsibly. My current girl is a rescue, someone's nightmare but a joy to me.(not PERFECT)
 

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We actually once owned a GSD who worked on pulling siding off soon after we brought her home. She also managed to go up the outdoor stairs to the garage apartment, boosted herself up and pulled off a row of shingles off a low-hanging span of room of the detached garage. She managed to somehow shove an enormous bottom-seat sofa cushion though the dog door to drag through the mud in the backyard when left un-crated one day. One of my chairs still has her teeth marks in the carved wood legs. She was a property-destroying monster as an adolescent. I know exactly why she was in the rescue where we found her!

OTOH, she was also the smartest GSD we've ever owned, and probably the best bred rescued dog we've owned. A knowledgeable breeder who saw her said WGSL, probably sieger grandparents, easily a $2k pup or more, twenty years ago -- he was disappointed to have not known about her in rescue as she was "special." To us she was just "our dog," and we had no information on who bred her. The reality was she was bored and too smart for her own good in her prior life. Someone up in a wealthy part of Santa Barbara dumped her -- and she made her way to breed rescue in Los Angeles, where we found her.

She needed a job and was giving herself lots of jobs -- look under the siding because there are interesting critters she can hear, and looking under shingles because the crows stash stuff under there. If your dog is pulling off siding, I'm not kidding when I say get a termite inspection....and then enroll in a nosework class!!! Or agility. Or anything you can start to engage your dog's need to puzzle out complex tasks, because THAT is what it's already doing, so find some tasks that are less expensive and more productive.

All the mischief with our dog stopped once we got serious about working with an AKC OB club, and started doing stuff with her -- exercise, adventures, classes, etc. The club had a variety of classes available. For us, their novice class was game-changing, as the lighbulb went on in her head that she was working, and she needed to work. She was a PHENOMENAL dog once she had a purpose and structure. DH even took her to work a lot of days to keep her constantly engaged, as his job allowed that. He practiced OB throughout the day at work.

So...yeah, I've actually owned that kind of dog, and no, I didn't surrender her. We got her because someone else did, and it was 100% our gain once we realized what she needed and devoted the time to her. We learned so much about being better dog owners from the challenge of fulfilling her and bringing out her potential. She was my DH's heart dog and passed of hemangio in 2012. His voice still catches when he talks about her -- she was his once-in-a-lifetime heart dog.


I sometimes wish it were possible in rescue to find the people who did the surrendering so that they would know what became of the dog. If nothing else, they'd know it ended up okay. Maybe for the next time, they'd realize what was possible with dedication and hard work. The reality of surrenders is that there's almost no way to ever find them though, so they never know if the dog ended up euthanized or with a forever home willing to give them the training and leadership they need. Our rescue has one that started out as a bit of problem-child and post-adoption earned his BH and TR1 recently...and we so wish whoever once owned him could see what a rockstar of a dog he's become with his current owner, but they'll never know.
 

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I sometimes wish it were possible in rescue to find the people who did the surrendering so that they would know what became of the dog. If nothing else, they'd know it ended up okay. Maybe for the next time, they'd realize what was possible with dedication and hard work. The reality of surrenders is that there's almost no way to ever find them though, so they never know if the dog ended up euthanized or with a forever home willing to give them the training and leadership they need. Our rescue has one that post-adoption earned his BH and TR1 recently...and we so wish whoever once owned him could see what a rockstar of a dog he's become, but they'll never know.
The breeder that tossed my Dane was eventually caught, in part because of her. When they contacted me prior to his hearing and asked if there was anything I wanted to said at the trial, I said tell him thanks for a great dog. In spite of everything she was a therapy dog who did amazing work, she loved her "work" days. She never met a stranger, everyone was her best friend, she helped dozens of seniors and countless children and was one of the dogs chosen for the rise above it talks to children with disabilities as she was deaf herself and had learned well over 100 different signs.
I once thought that I would love to find the folks that used to tie their dogs to my fence at night, or dump the puppies on my steps but they probably wouldn't care, Owners like the OP are exactly why no puppy or dog left my house without housetraining, leash work, crate training and basic manners. If that means they stay longer then so be it. It's the reason I will always volunteer my time to help anyone get the basics down and the reason that I hand out step by step potty and crate training advice. Lack of basic training puts too many dogs into shelters, or worse. I know it seems like common sense but some folks just cannot wrap their heads around it.
 

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Some people luck out & get PERFECT dogs...
They don't, though. Most of us who've had this breed for years and loved this breed for years have put TONS of work into guiding and molding them into the dogs we eventually end up with. And I think that's a large part of your problem - you expected to end up with a great dog without having to put any time and effort in. Anyone could have told you that's just not going to happen. I don't recall reading your earlier thread (thanks Heartandsoul for reposting), but I'm guessing that many people DID tell you what you needed to do.

At this point I don't blame you for wanting to give him up. I'm actually surprised it took this long. At 6 months old he sounded pretty normal for an untrained, under stimulated, unsupervised 6 month old GSD pup left to his own devices way too much, with no rules or boundaries. Totally predictable. An additional year of that, well, the outcome is exactly what I'd expect. I think the best thing for him and you would be to find a good rescue to surrender him to. It sounds like what you'll feel most is relief.
 

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I think if you pursue dog ownership again in the future, it would be in your best interest to choose a low energy, couch potato of a dog. I don’t think a driven breed like a German Shepherd suits your ownership style, and there’s nothing wrong with that as long as you accept it for what it is.

I have two small breed mixes that are my family dogs I grew up with. My mom let them free roam once when they were a young age. Once. Since then, they have been crated unless someone is home. They turn 15 and 14 this year and we’ve had one since 8 weeks and the other since 8 months.
 
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