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Reich is still all screwed up in regard to other dogs since the sh!t across the street bolted over and terrorized her.

Came home from work and since it was so nice out, decided me and her would walk down to get the kids from my mom's.

She LOVED meeting all the people that were out playing and walking around. Kids, adults -a drunkard who wandered out of the bar just to see her even-, she loves people.
But if she even heard another dog, she started melting down.

Trying to hide under cars, pull to run away, etc. Barking, whining, shaking, cowhering.

I did my best to stay in control, ignore her freaking out and keep her focused on me and our walk.

She didn't do too badly, we got there..and back home.

As soon as we walked into mom's door, Wolfgang (her 9 week old GSD pup) ran right up and initiated play. No issues at all. She looked happy to see him. So far him and Angus (my mutt) are her buddies, she has no problems interacting with them.

New dogs and neighbor's dogs are a whole different ball game. As soon as we get out onto the porch, she barks. Not at anything, but to say 'HEY! I'M OUT HERE! LEAVE ME ALONE!'

She hears or sees other dogs, she barks, growls, and displays fear aggressive posture/behavior.

Like in mom's back yard. We went out, and the white toy breed dog next door was out. She wouldn't pee because she wouldn't stop barking at it, backing up, then charging the fence snarling.

I want to get her into the next puppy class I can, now I'm concerned she's going to spend the whole time barking her head off, whining, and basically falling apart because of the other pups.

She's only about 13 weeks old. Is this something we can fix, or is it more likely something we'll have to work to just manage the rest of her life?
I feel so bad for her, and I don't want her to be afraid of strange dogs forever.

I'm also torn as she hasn't finished all of her booster shots yet, so shouldn't really be out places many other dogs are/have been. But I don't want to put off trying to address this issue either.

Any thoughts or insights appreciated.
 

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The fence fighting part is part barrier agression. My two would run the fence and bark at their lab buddy when he lived next door in Wyoming.

There's a lot more to address here but it's late and I'm crosseyed.
 

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Originally Posted By: Reichsmom
Like in mom's back yard. We went out, and the white toy breed dog next door was out. She wouldn't pee because she wouldn't stop barking at it, backing up, then charging the fence snarling.
With my current house and my previous house, I am surrounded by dogs...I don't like fence aggression and I don't tolerate it from any of my dogs. When each dog came into my house, potty breaks were done on a long line. Any move towards the other dog on the side of the fence had me recalling them in with a firm no. When they did it on their own, they were rewarded HUGE!!

Your issue is different, I would definitely take her out on the line and do whatever I could to re-direct her, food toys, walking in circles, whatever it takes.. Teach her the "leave it" command so that you can use it in situations like this.

Originally Posted By: ReichsmomI want to get her into the next puppy class I can, now I'm concerned she's going to spend the whole time barking her head off, whining, and basically falling apart because of the other pups.
You have to Socialize her as much as possible, I would take her to a few classes, to see how she does. Even if you are just sitting in a corner the whole time, she needs controlled exposure in order to learn to ignore other dogs.

She is still a baby, you can fix this. You may not have miss little social on your hands but you can at least get her to ignore other dogs.

My Cyrus has leash aggression issues with other dogs, when I would see another dog approach I would keep his leash loose and once he noticed the other dog and started to tense up I used the leave it command, walked around in circles and spit hot dogs at him. He loves hot dogs, so this way I had his full attention. I made myself more interesting than the other dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys.
If I can get her to ignore other dogs -which seems to entail getting her confident in herself, or at least in my leadership, around them- I'll be a happy camper.
It's amazing how much ONE incident can impact them.
Just prior to the bad experience we had her at the vet...and while she didn't actively seek out interaction with the other dogs present, she was fine. Comfortable, confident, and agreeable. Didn't mind them approaching and sniffing her in the least.
Now the poor girl is a bundle of nerves just hearing one in close proximity.

Thank you both for your input! I really appreciate it. We've got alot of work to do...but as always, I see it as a great opportunity to bond and get to know eachother even better.
 

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My pup was attacked on a walk by two off-leash dogs when he was about 3-4 months old. Like your pup, he was wary of other dogs, and freaked out when there were dogs around that were off leash.

I made a concerted effort to keep him in classes. As soon as one class ended, we'd sign up for another. While it's really hard to predict what's going to happen on the sidewalk in your neighborhood, classes are more predictable. And you have the instructor to help you out. It took my boy about 4 months to be pretty much "over" his attack.

A lot of the work we did entailed my Dh (who was walking him at the time of the initial attack) and to some extent, me not getting nervous when other dogs approach. If we tighten up even slightly or inhale even a bit more than usual, our dogs notice it. They assume "my owner is worried, so I should be afraid too." Then they respond accordingly. Talk to your instructor and let her know what you're dealing with. Once you've been in class a while, you may even want to schedule a private lesson to work on your reactions out in the real world.

But just keep getting back on the horse. Your pup is very young, which means that even though she's in a fear stage, she's also capable of learning new things quickly. Just keep at it. Be consistent. Control YOUR fears and reactions (Which is hard, I know). Keep at it. Work with a trainer. I know, first hand, that what you went through was traumatic. But you should know that my little guy, who had to go to the vet and receive stiches from the big gash that the other dogs gave him, is now almost two years old and works as my service dog, attends dog club events, and is a confident, happy, generally well-rounded guy.


You can do it!
 
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