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Discussion Starter #1
Sad, sad, sad. And so predictable. I could write the details, but the details don't really matter. The essential ingredients in our neighbor's dog produced a predictable outcome:

Adult male GSD + testicles + alone all day indoors day after day = bit neighbor.

The trifecta.

I love this dog, like the owner, and feel terrible. He's a magnificent dog. But....he's loose in the house, neighbor with intact small dog walks by, little girl opens the door, dog rushes to go after the dog and bites its handler.

Ugh. Please, people. Don't get a GSD if you plan to leave them alone all day. You've clearly given them their job: guard the house and family. You've also, by your long hours of absence, given them their mandate: freely decide for yourself (the dog) to choose who's the enemy.
 

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and how does love correlate with getting a dog and leaving him alone all day. i do agree with the overall point of your post.
 

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the ++= formula is not accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
what does testicles have to do with anything?
You got me. I'll have to duck the eggs thrown my way, and that's okay. :eek:

But every adult male, intact, left alone all day that I have seen (so yes, it's my perspective, but aren't all posts?) has aggression issues, like a time bomb ready to go off.

Sad...weren't GSD's the original Seeing Eye Dog? What on earth happened over the years. :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
the ++= formula is not accurate.
(ducking eggs, again :blush:)

What is the missing ingredient? Because it seems like a lot of male GSD problems are out there and have these three in common, despite the love, attention and basic training.

Genetics?
 

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and how does love correlate with getting a dog and leaving him alone all day. i do agree with the overall point of your post.
Don't know if that's at me.
Is there a new requirement for dog ownership and love, to have a human with them at almost all times?

Are only couples where one can stay at home allowed to have dogs?

Sometimes this place just cracks me up.:)
 

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I'm just wondering why the girl was opening the door?
If my neighbour decided to open my door and I wasn't home I'm sure I can't guarantee you wouldn't get bitten either?
Or am I missing something?
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
:blush::blush::blush:

Okay, that's three eggs so far.

So, then what are the surefire ingredients for well-meaning people with their GSDs? I'm not talking about all the subtle variants, but the BASICS of how to raise an aggressive, male GSD. (My definition of aggressive is aggressive NOT on command, but deciding for themselves, inappropriately).

Here's my go at it. Feel free to pick it apart, and maybe the final product will be pretty accurate (there are always exceptions to the rule).

  1. Get a GSD from a risky source for sound temperament (genetics), such as a backyard breeder. You might get lucky...you might not.
  2. Don't train. Or if you do, do it sporadically and without consistency.
  3. Keep the dog at home, either in the yard or inside. Let the dog spend most of its hours thinking for himself.
  4. When you get home, take him for a walk, at most. Then go out to happy hour, your evening class, night job, girlfriend's house - anything that takes you away from him.
  5. Now that he's unpredictable, reinforce his feelings of insecurity by being worried about how he reacts in new situations. This will cue him that his feelings of fear are correct.
  6. Don't neuter. Keep the hormones raging.
  7. Make sure most of what he hears you say is a correction, so he doesn't get very used to how to please you.
  8. When he's cute or handsome, just go love on him for no reason. While love is a wonderful thing, but in the absence of training and learning how to please you, it does nothing to reinforce what he should do.
  9. Let him choose where he sits, sleeps and when/what he eats in the house.
Okay, how about now? Did I get these right? I'm not posting to be "right" or to provoke an argument. But since my trifecta was short sighted (I was just upset, just learning of the situation), what are the ingredients?

I think this is a good start. Edits? Because people have got to know. So tired of these stories. I feel bad for the dogs. :(
 

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More like lack of training, socialization, and supervision of the dog with children=neighbor gets bit
 

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Adult male GSD + testicles + alone all day indoors day after day = bit neighbor.
As I'm hoping to bring home a male puppy in the near future that will grow to be an adult intact GSD I would certainly hope this is a bad joke. Lots of people work. Lots of people also socialize their dogs, train them and ensure they are good examples of the breed. A few bad apples doesn't make the whole tree bad. Too bad some people can't handle their dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I see this as a isolated incident.
Okay, so I know I'm in left field...but I go back to my earlier point of GSDs being the original Seeing Eye Dogs. When did raising a GSD become such a challenge to prevent aggression? Genetics must have changed over time, due to bad breeding. I don't think the "shepherd", which should be gentle by nature, and only protective when there is a VERY clear threat, was supposed to have these issues.

Of course, now I'm speaking generally, and not of this incident.

Thoughts?
 

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Okay, how about now? Did I get these right? I'm not posting to be "right" or to provoke an argument. But since my trifecta was short sighted (I was just upset, just learning of the situation), what are the ingredients?
I'd agree, more or less.

I might quibble with your #8 and #9 (or at least the first two points of 9 -- obviously I don't let my dogs choose for themselves what they want to eat) because I don't see affection and a reasonable degree of autonomy creating unruly terrors. Silvia Trkman's not exactly out there wailing to the heavens about how an excess of love and freedom is causing her dogs to take over the world (although they are taking over the world, in agility at least!).

But shaky genetics, inconsistent "training," undersocialization, mostly negative attention, inadequate exercise or mental stimulation, and a total lack of meaningful relationship? Yep, there's your recipe for a junkyard dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I'd agree, more or less.

I might quibble with your #8 and #9 (or at least the first two points of 9 -- obviously I don't let my dogs choose for themselves what they want to eat) because I don't see affection and a reasonable degree of autonomy creating unruly terrors. Silvia Trkman's not exactly out there wailing to the heavens about how an excess of love and freedom is causing her dogs to take over the world (although they are taking over the world, in agility at least!).

But shaky genetics, inconsistent "training," undersocialization, mostly negative attention, inadequate exercise or mental stimulation, and a total lack of meaningful relationship? Yep, there's your recipe for a junkyard dog.
lol! Okay, by choosing when/what to eat, I mean counter surfing and/or expecting their handler's food to be shared.

Myah better lay down and forget about the fact I'm eating. Then, I'll share with her at the very end - only sometimes, and only if she goes through some obedience commands.

I love, love, love on her. Hugs, kisses and lots of affection. But she gets at least that amount, if not more, when she does what she is asked to do.

Okay, I've got to sign out. I've got get on with my day.

At least, between all the eggs and what not, there may be some pearls of truth that rise to the surface here, as the thread gets a full working over. :apple:
 

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You have a good list as for dogs in general but I don't see it in this instance necessarily. Don't know enough about the individual dog.

I agree with courtney that it's probably isolated incident.

GSDs are a breed with aggression, protectiveness, and prey drive among other things. Girl opens the door and one or all of these could kick in along with lack of training etc..

I think many GSDs genetics have take a hit unfortunately, and many would not be fit to be seeing eye dogs.
 
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