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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi there!
I’ve posted a few times here before under another account (it was with my fb) but I’m back with more concerns. I have a now 7 month old GSD and (what the humane society told me) Dutch shepard mix.
She was weighed in late December at the vet, so roughly a month ago, and she was only 38.7 lbs. Currently, her ribs and spine aren’t showing when she stands but they’re felt pretty easily and compared to other GSD’s I’ve seen and charts I’ve read, she seems to be underweight.

On top of this, she does have a habit of eating her own poop and as she sleeps next to me right now is passing a lot of gas. I’ve had EPI on the brain for a while and I just want some second opinions on whether or not this should be a real concern. This week alone she’s eaten her poop two or three times.

She acts normally and doesn’t beg for food or display signs of hunger, but like any dog she would never turn down food offered to her.
 

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What are her dumps like?........runny or solid ???




SuperG
On like a fecal rating scale, they’re normally between a 2 or 3
So it’s by no means diarrhea but it’s usually pretty soft. When I first got her it would be solid stool followed by super soft stool, but that stopped and now it’s usually always the same consistency. She did go through like 2 days of liquid a few days ago.
 

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7 months seems a bit early for EPI to truly manifest itself in a GSD.....I could be wrong.


I had an EPI GSD and I was not nearly as educated as you are regarding this disorder.


Upside is......completely manageable once you know if it is responsible for the dog's lacking of absorption of nutrients and weight loss.


Since you have this "EPI on the brain".....I assume you could have the proper testing conducted by your vet to determine the status of your dog's pancreatic functions and proceed from there.




Best of luck,


SuperG
 

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7 months seems a bit early for EPI to truly manifest itself in a GSD.....I could be wrong.


I had an EPI GSD and I was not nearly as educated as you are regarding this disorder.


Upside is......completely manageable once you know if it is responsible for the dog's lacking of absorption of nutrients and weight loss.


Since you have this "EPI on the brain".....I assume you could have the proper testing conducted by your vet to determine the status of your dog's pancreatic functions and proceed from there.




Best of luck,


SuperG
Thank you!!
Do you happen to remember the cost of testing for EPI?
 

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Have you tried adding anything to help solidify her stools? Canned pumpkin, some probiotics (FortiFlora by Purina) or maybe switching to a different meat source? My two can't seem to agree on anything but a fish based kibble (one likes beef, other has runny poops. One likes chicken, but the other then gets smelly, runny poops). My third is on diet food, but has always had solid stools.


Edit to add: my female's spine and ribs are felt easily, but aren't seen. I don't necessarily think that means they're underweight. At 7 months, I'd be more worried about an overweight than slightly underweight dog. Mixes can be hard to judge size (even purebreds).
 
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7 months and 40# for a female that has no signs of EPI and condition seems good would simply imply to me thst she might just be on the smaller side. Especially when you don't know for sure what she's mixed with.
 

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7 months and 40# for a female that has no signs of EPI and condition seems good would simply imply to me thst she might just be on the smaller side. Especially when you don't know for sure what she's mixed with.
I agree.

I got a smaller female myself. Bright side shes very fast and agile. Less prone to joint injuries at a lower weight. I dont like the size charts found online. She was 60lbs the other day at vet when I picked up her heart guard stuff. Her weight hasn't changed since she was like 7 months! You can feel her ribs but cant really see them. My wife says I feed her too much at her dinner meal. I like to chef up her kibble!

I am curious about the poop eating though. Mei doesn't do it all the time but I've caught her doing it. I figure it's just a dog thing. Hope it's not a serious problem.
 

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In Ohio..EPI test was $80

Thank you!!
Do you happen to remember the cost of testing for EPI?
In Ohio..$80 - 7 to 10 day wait. If you think your dog might have it don't wait until it's too late.
The Black GSD I was going to adopt was 7.5 months when she showed symptoms. She didn't make it- only weighed 34 pounds at 9 months. Started out above 60 pounds we are now finding out.
 

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Mine never ate his own poop. And he did pass a lot of gas, but that happened more to the latter half of his life. He was at 80 lbs before he started dropping to 55 lbs when he was officially diagnosed. He was skin and bones. Eventually he made it back up to 98lbs with medication and he was still thin at that weight. When he was at 55lbs, you could see his ribs and spine. He was eating like a horse but still dropping weight and his poop was very runny and sometimes had a slimy film on it. And it smelled really bad. Also at times the poop was yellowish. I'm also no expert. This is just my experience with an EPI dog. If it's on your mind, then you should go get her tested.
 

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For the gas, I would try adding some Prozyme (or another digestive enzyme of your choice), with a little water to activate it. It makes a big difference for many dogs (even if they don't have EPI).


Your dog is absolutely gorgeous, by the way. Her coat looks good to me in the pictures -- shiny and thick -- which tends to point toward absorbing nutrients well. I feel like the black-coated dogs I've rescued usually revealed a lot through their coats, as they look flat and dull when they're not well nourished, and become sleek and shiny when healthy (almost glowing when the sun hits). Keep in mind too that adolescents are often gangly, awkward string-beans -- they usually have fast metabolisms and need a lot of calories to support growth, so it's not uncommon for them to be on the skinny side, even when well-fed. They eventually hit a point where they fill out and suddenly look like "real" dogs.
 

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Go over to www.epi4dogs.com and you will get a ton of info and help. Not all EPI dogs exhibit the same symptoms. I would run the test, it's not that expensive or invasive. GSDs' are the poster child for EPI so it's always a concern.


Hope you get it figured out soon :)
 
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