German Shepherds Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The worst thing you can do to your dog is make him/her heavy. Sixty percent of our pets are overweight and about 20% of these are obese. Love is not food; food is not love. Lean dogs live longer. A study with Labs showed that you take two years off the lifespan if your dog is overweight. The basic rule for any dog is that you can feel the ribs with a slight fat cover. Heavy dogs wear out the cartilage in their joints and suffer more arthritis as they age. Spaying and neutering tend to reduce the metabolism of calories, so you need to adjust feeding after they're fixed. Don't blame early spaying/neutering (3-5 months) for this. It's the owner feeding too much and not exercising enough or at all. But if you can't exercise (blame Covid), you just feed less. If you feed more calories than you burn, you put on weight. Check your dog's weight weekly, measure the food (don't feed what the bag recommends), and adjust accordingly. It's nearly always safe to reduce your dog's food 25%.
 

·
Registered
Pike
Joined
·
212 Posts
I agree with your sentiments on weight. Some owners like to brag about the size of their dog. I am proud of my dog too. Not because he is huge, but the fact that he is lean, well-muscled, and athletic. I am lucky to live in an area where I can run him, off lead, for miles. He is my hiking companion year-round in the Cascades and Blue Mt.'s of the PNW. He needs to possess strength, endurance and a certain level of toughness.

Because of what he gives to me, I owe him the best possible dog life I can give to him. We both live a better, longer life together.

Dog Snow Carnivore Fawn Freezing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,609 Posts
The worst thing you can do to your dog is make him/her heavy. Sixty percent of our pets are overweight and about 20% of these are obese. Love is not food; food is not love. Lean dogs live longer. A study with Labs showed that you take two years off the lifespan if your dog is overweight. The basic rule for any dog is that you can feel the ribs with a slight fat cover. Heavy dogs wear out the cartilage in their joints and suffer more arthritis as they age. Spaying and neutering tend to reduce the metabolism of calories, so you need to adjust feeding after they're fixed. Don't blame early spaying/neutering (3-5 months) for this. It's the owner feeding too much and not exercising enough or at all. But if you can't exercise (blame Covid), you just feed less. If you feed more calories than you burn, you put on weight. Check your dog's weight weekly, measure the food (don't feed what the bag recommends), and adjust accordingly. It's nearly always safe to reduce your dog's food 25%.
Agree entirely but source?
And COVID (the time period, not having it) is/was no excuse for a lack of exercise imo. In fact, most working from home just gave further opportunity.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top