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I hear this term a lot. Not really 100% sure of the defination.

Would this be an example of weak nerves?

The other day in class I was working on focus. The instructor was about 10 feet behind us and she dropped a big cone on the floor with a big bang. I was looking at her so I knew it was coming. It startled Dakota, she turned around (still maintaining her sit), realized what it was and then resumed focus work with me. I have now idea how the other dogs reacted as I was doing focus work.

Is this weak nerves?
 

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I don't know for sure, but I don't think so. I would think that weak nerves would be if it really frightened the dog to the point that the dog wouldn't resume their work. I'm not an expert. I'm sure someone else will know for sure.
 

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From what you described your dog doesn't have weak nerves.
A dog with weak nerves will not recover from startling and will show timidness, try to get away or go hide.
To carry on with the command after the big bang is a sign of steady nerves.
And looking at what caused it is good, better than ignoring it or trying to get over to it.
 

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Dropping an object or otherwise making a loud noise is a part of the TDI test, and I believe it's also a part of the CGC, although it's been a while since we've tested for the CGC so I am not entirely sure. It's done to gauge a dog's reaction.

What your dog did was the absolutely normal reaction to a sudden, loud noise - investigate, be interested, but not being scared. What a weak nerved dog would have done would have been to become frightened, tuck his tail, hide behind you, try to bolt away, or otherwise freak out.
 

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To me, the "nerves" have two parts: 1) the threshold for when the dog becomes startled/anxious/stressed/whatever and, 2) how quickly the dog can recover.

I have one dog with a very *high* threshold, but once it is reached, the dog cannot recover and once that threshold is reached, that person/place/thing is like "tainted" to the dog. This dog is actually more "nervy" than another dog of mine who has a much lower threshold (might duck his head at the sound of a gunshot or firework, for example) but recovers instantly.
 

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Dropping an object or otherwise making a loud noise is a part of the TDI test, and I believe it's also a part of the CGC, although it's been a while since we've tested for the CGC so I am not entirely sure. It's done to gauge a dog's reaction.
They do drop stuff for the CGC :)
 
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