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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
He is 16 months old and hasn't had a T-day (test-osteron overload day) in quite a while. But I knew, I could feel the vibes, when I got him out of his crate this morning, it would be one of those days of testing the limits. Here are some examples, all in one day: (note: he mastered everything prior to today as I will not ask anything from him he is not capable of doing)
1. Breaking his sit-stay with fetch: he went after the ball without the command "fetch" and didn't stop when I told him to. So I went to get him and brought him inside for a time out where he cried as if he was abandoned.
2. "Forgetting" what heeling meant.
3. Getting up from a down stay without permission.
4. Looking straight at me when I told him to sit but not doing it.
5. Pestering the old dogs when I was on the phone.
6. Sneaking out the door in front of me.
There were more throughout the day. I ignored him pretty much when not working with him and made sure I won every battle.
Results!! At dinner he stayed in a down stay and fell asleep. Has been good since. I know he will be awesome tomorrow.
I reminded me of my son when he was 13 years old.
It was annoying but fun at the same time. He is a healthy young male, doing what he is supposed to do I guess. He made me earn my leadership today.:D
I wonder if the adolescent female dogs have testing days like this?
 

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Zoey tests us or at least has similar days as you've described. Just returned from a walk about an hour ago and she resorted to squealing with excitement and yip yip yipping down the first block and a half, also forgot how to heal. My wife had me walk her cause she was embarrassed. I call it her sled dog howling.
 

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Can't blame the full moon :)

Beau has pushed some buttons but Cyra (female) did as well!
Think of it, ever lived with a 13 year old female human? hahahaha.
 

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1. Breaking his sit-stay with fetch: he went after the ball without the command "fetch" and didn't stop when I told him to. So I went to get him and brought him inside for a time out where he cried as if he was abandoned.
He knows you are gonna send him so why should he wait. :rolleyes:

The dog can read the game but finds it more rewarding doing as he likes.

2. "Forgetting" what heeling meant.
3. Getting up from a down stay without permission.
4. Looking straight at me when I told him to sit but not doing it.
5. Pestering the old dogs when I was on the phone.
6. Sneaking out the door in front of me.
The dog needs options, challenges and rewards. I think you expect the dog to know your commands without spending enough time teaching them individually and reinforcing them. There is also a discipline issue with the dog being to excited to compete the tasks asked of it.

I would start using longer training sessions, run the dog hard at the start and when it is a bit tired start to teach the dog what you want. I would never stop training for a dog breaking a stay. Just do it again and again, modifying how you place the ball, at what distance it is away etc giving hand or verbal signals for the dog to stay then build up the distance again. Teach the dog to heel away from the ball and send him back to get it. You are then creating focus through it's drive to get the object.

Every day can be a new challenge for the owner to create ways to reward and motivate the dog to do as you like. The dog will choose the easiest path and somtimes that is not listening or obeying. You must show the dog it will be rewarded when it plays your game. Chasing, catching and tug are the rewards that a dog likes in my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
He knows you are gonna send him so why should he wait. :rolleyes:

The dog can read the game but finds it more rewarding doing as he likes.

The dog needs options, challenges and rewards. I think you expect the dog to know your commands without spending enough time teaching them individually and reinforcing them. There is also a discipline issue with the dog being to excited to compete the tasks asked of it.

I would start using longer training sessions, run the dog hard at the start and when it is a bit tired start to teach the dog what you want. I would never stop training for a dog breaking a stay. Just do it again and again, modifying how you place the ball, at what distance it is away etc giving hand or verbal signals for the dog to stay then build up the distance again. Teach the dog to heel away from the ball and send him back to get it. You are then creating focus through it's drive to get the object.

Every day can be a new challenge for the owner to create ways to reward and motivate the dog to do as you like. The dog will choose the easiest path and somtimes that is not listening or obeying. You must show the dog it will be rewarded when it plays your game. Chasing, catching and tug are the rewards that a dog likes in my opinion.
I agree with your advice if this were an untrained dog or one not ready for this particular level. But he does all that normally.
And guess what today: he is his old perfect self again; obedient, deferring and calm. I knew he was testing me.
 
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