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Since dogs make up the majority of my life, I have to say, that maybe I have a bit of a biased view on this.

Dog's hurt us in a lot of ways, yeah when they go and die on us. I mean, sometimes we get advanced warning, dog gets old, starts limping, starts not taking care of itself, starts failing to come running when the fridge opens. And then they up and die, and we lose our minds.

Then there are those that die from accidents and sudden illnesses that are not easy either.

But I wasn't thinking about them dying. Or the injuries. Or that special knack that have of putting us on a guilt trip without ever saying a word. Yep, when you give the old bitch the rest of your chocolate donut because you just cannot look into those deep wells that are telling you that she never, ever had anything so wonderful in her whole life.

And then there is the undeniable fact that they are not good for our punctuality. When the old lady, who will suffer herself to stay under the covers just long enough for the ice on the bed spread to start cracking, and then she is off to her bed on the floor, when the alarm goes off that third time, and she climbs up there, even though it's hard, and curls up right in the small of your back where you would be willing to let her be forever...

And then there are puppies. Puppies can be watched for hours. Prime time television is for the sad folks who are not blessed with being able to watch puppies. They aren't good for your punctuality.

And then there is your self-esteem. You LOVE these dogs, and LOVE the pups, and when a couple of juvenile delinquents think their best game is to have one of them saunter up behind you and then two others come running head on at 40mph. And you step back and nearly fall over the bugger back there, have a minor heart attack, spewing a foreign language out of your mouth, whilst the three of them trot away high fiving each other for getting you to make those special sounds again.

And the older ones nearby, are looking on, with an expression that could be irritation that the young'ns didn't get you to the ground, or that they weren't in on it too.

Ah well.

And they aren't any good at all for your pocketbook. They eat, lots. And you feel guilty if you aren't buying good food, so you are forking out more money for their food than for your own. You certainly check the ingredient lists, and where it's sourced, while you will eat a hot dog from a street vendor, oh yeah! And training. And grooming. And every gadget under the sun for training and grooming and feeding. And TOYS, and treats, and bones, and meat -- because that food can't possibly have enough. Let's not forget the vet. We will take the dog to the vet for a limp or a bump or a drippy nose, that won't get us to the doctor. Dogs, they will drive you into the poor house if you let them. Even if you don't let them, one day, there you are, facing the poor house, and wondering what happened, as you scratch the girl beside you and give her the rest of your burger.

You know you are gone, when you worry about the day you are too feeble to own a German Shepherd. And when your car starts sliding on the highway, and your thoughts go to who will take care of the dogs. Yeah, bad, bad, bad, dogs are bad for you.

Socially, well once you have gone overboard with dogs, people who are not dog people, they tend to fall off the face of the world. And, I think it isn't totally them causing that. So your friends tend to have dogs and understand why you have to stay home with your dog today rather than doing whatever it is you planned three weeks ago. And they can talk and listen to you about dogs for hours, non-dog people are like, "yeah, that's why I don't have a dog" two minutes into your conversation.

Maybe some people can do dogs in moderation. But I am sure I could manage to lose my mind on just one as easy as with many.

Anyone else have ways dogs are bad for you?
 

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We can be contagious. Like when my 70 year old non dog owning visitor chases my 2 year old dog, (who adjusts his speed to accommodate her), to get the toy he is carrying, when I explained his invitation to play. My visitor loved it!
 

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Yeah, the vet. Ugh. If I had been agonizing like this about myself ... I would be considered a hypochondriac. I've been known to defend myself there "I promise I'm not making it up!" The last time the vet said 'his eyes look normal to me. They are a little red, so maybe that's what you're seeing". so here's the deal ... the inside corner of his eye seems to me to occlude his eye a little ... but the vet thinks it's just more noticeable being red. (Personally, I still think it looks like it needs ...something done to it). Or maybe it's because it's red ... I don't know. *pulls out hair*

Food .. I should have a degree in dog food. Food is ridiculous. $70 for 25 lbs is ...nuts. I can't bring myself to get something else now, though. He likes it! Of course, I don't want to pay $2.00 for a fountain drink for myself so I reuse my cups so I can get them for 75 cents. Duh.
 

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Socially, well once you have gone overboard with dogs, people who are not dog people, they tend to fall off the face of the world. And, I think it isn't totally them causing that. So your friends tend to have dogs and understand why you have to stay home with your dog today rather than doing whatever it is you planned three weeks ago. And they can talk and listen to you about dogs for hours, non-dog people are like, "yeah, that's why I don't have a dog" two minutes into your conversation.

Maybe some people can do dogs in moderation. But I am sure I could manage to lose my mind on just one as easy as with many.
Oh yeah, absolutely. I have just one. Somehow I feel that's more intense because I focus so totally on her training and activities and now dog sports as she gets older. I'd have to lay off and multitask if I had multiple dogs.

At this point, I gravitate toward dog people vs non-dog people. I maintain relationships with non-dog people, but I liken it to "in the trenches of _______" friends for anything: especially demanding work, graduate school, parenthood, whatever it is that you are DOING (note, not doing, but DOING: throwing yourself into wholeheartedly). They are right there with you and they get it. There's an effortlessness that comes to relating when you are DOING something together. I think that's probably why. It isn't at all the fault of the non-dog people, it's just how things happen with anything we do intensely.

On a practical/logistical level, our families have seen less of us because of the dog; until she was spayed and had her stomach tacked, I refused to board her. She isn't invited to my ILs' home, so that meant a room at a dog-friendly hotel and a shortened visit. I missed a huge milestone birthday party on that side of the family because it was the one time my puppy picked up a bug, and the vet was advising heavily against traveling with her (I sent my husband on his own). There are allergies in my family despite them being dog lovers, so she couldn't always travel with us to them either. This should be lessening now that we board her without thinking twice, but for awhile, it meant we barely saw his family at all and mine only when they came to us (mine live much closer). Between weather causing travel issues at exactly the wrong time and the dog, I haven't seen our nieces and nephews for...I forget the last time I saw any of them.

What probably is bad is that while I continue to put in effort with my non-dog friends, I no longer feel all that motivated to deal with non-dog friends-in-law. I work a lot of hours, so I am protective of my off-hours and I'd rather go to a dog thing than their stuff. So because I don't want it to adversely affect my marriage I will just ask my husband, "Is it important to YOU?" in the event of a scheduling conflict between dog stuff and his friends. Dog stuff will always, always win unless it's important to him that I'm there.
 

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I drink more now because of the dog. Not that he is driving me to drink.

But when I do go out for social occassions - most of my friends are dog people so we go to the dog bar instead of out to dinner, because the dogs can come with us.

Now that it's getting nicer maybe we will start going to some dog friendly patios instead lol
 

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Some of my strange words include, "You're driving me to drink!!!"
 

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conversations go like this:
"want to go out to eat?"
"sure, know any good dog friendly restaurants?"
Or, "I can meet you, but it'll have to be a little later so I can stop at home and let the dog out and feed her."
HA. Both of these.

Our favorite summer bar/restaurant is dog friendly, we're always on the lookout for others.


I could see dogs being bad for relationships, in some circumstances... If my husband did not have all-consuming after work dedication (firefighting), I think we would run into disagreements about how much time and resources I spend with the dogs. Thankfully we're both very independent people, so I do my thing, he does his.

He doesn't want to spend precious free time carting himself all over the place for dog training and seminars regardless of snow, heat and bugs, and I don't want to sprint out the door in the middle of the night to go extinguish a burning garage. The biggest downside, (thankfully we only talk about this once a year during tax season), is that he gets paid for his "hobby".... while mine rapidly siphons money out of the checking account.


Last year around Christmas I realized just how different "dog people" are when my husband graciously agreed to go to our herding group's Christmas party. He is an outgoing, talkative person by nature, but he was at a total loss as to how to participate in the conversations. I appreciate his effort, but I have a feeling that this year I'll be attending alone.
 

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Our favorite summer bar/restaurant is dog friendly, we're always on the lookout for others.

I could see dogs being bad for relationships, in some circumstances... If my husband did not have all-consuming after work dedication (firefighting), I think we would run into disagreements about how much time and resources I spend with the dogs. Thankfully we're both very independent people, so I do my thing, he does his.

He doesn't want to spend precious free time carting himself all over the place for dog training and seminars regardless of snow, heat and bugs, and I don't want to sprint out the door in the middle of the night to go extinguish a burning garage. The biggest downside, (thankfully we only talk about this once a year during tax season), is that he gets paid for his "hobby".... while mine rapidly siphons money out of the checking account.

Last year around Christmas I realized just how different "dog people" are when my husband graciously agreed to go to our herding group's Christmas party. He is an outgoing, talkative person by nature, but he was at a total loss as to how to participate in the conversations. I appreciate his effort, but I have a feeling that this year I'll be attending alone.
I can so relate.

Only we don't take our dog to bars with us because I don't trust her yet to behave the way I expect. Just like I don't want to deal with my friend constantly interrupting the conversation to discipline her toddler, I'm assuming my friend doesn't want to deal with me reminding my dog to lie down and be quiet. So dog stays home. My city is hugely dog-friendly and there's no shortage of bar patios, but she doesn't get to partake until I think she's mature enough to handle it. :p

I do hear a lot (lovingly) about how expensive my dog is. The truth is that she's at least as much his dog by her own estimation (and they're BFFs), but when she's naughty or expensive, she's my dog. Part of the relationship I've built with her is centered around obedience and dog activities, so I'm her sole handler in that arena. I'm off the better part of a lot of weekends doing that stuff with her, or volunteering for something dog-related. Like your husband, he has his own activity that amounts to a part time job, so that helps a great deal.

I know one of his pet peeves is when I slip and use dog terms - totally out of habit - and he doesn't understand why I can't just say mom and dad instead of dam and sire, or shoulder instead of withers, and I'm forgetting the one that really threw him the other day but to be fair it was more obscure. It was probably some command or trial lingo that he isn't going to know because he hasn't attended an obedience anything since puppy class.
 

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Well a dog caused us to buy an RV . We lost our dog sitter to marriage and our son is not my idea of the ideal dog sitter. OK St Francis might be my only ideal dog sitter. Anyways we have talked about vacations with the dogs which lead to the idea of camping w/ a RV where humans and dogs could camp . So we now have a older RV b/c Charlie would do best in an RV for long trips. It is a big dog house w/ wheels.
Second I have been on the search for the best bed for each individual dogs that they could love for 15 years now. I had one for both Lucky and Daisy however despite multiple purchases couldn't find a bed that satisfied Chevy or Thunder. Kind of stupid on my part Chevy wanted our couch and it was all ready there. Thunder would lay next to her bed on the floor. Charlie eschews a dog bed and has found that the queen sized bed in our guest room fits her just fine despite my attempts to get her to use one of our 5 brand new beds that no one liked.
Toys I could be retired now. Charlie gets toys for sight impaired dogs in hopes she will someday return the toy that makes noises when its thrown.
Treats and food. Don't get me started we have all organic grain free ,turkey duck you name the meat category we have bought it in attempt to find treats that motivate in training are easy on Seniors teeth and allergy sensitivity and now ones that Charlie will at least be motivated to look at you when you offer it. Amazon loves me.
We don't go out for evenings much b/c as it has been said here we need to be with the pups. I think this may be the one way the dogs have helped us save money.
 

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Daisy & Lucky's Mom, your post reminded me of another one.


We have stayed in some seriously.... SERIOUSLY.... sketchy hotels while traveling with dogs, because they were the only dog friendly, non-breed banning, accommodation in towns we were traveling through. The kind where you sleep on top of the covers. The worst one I can recall was when we opened the mini fridge and found an open, partially consumed bag of raw hotdogs dripping into the bottom tray.


I would not be surprised if some form of camper/RV happens in our future, especially if we encounter another Hotdog Motel situation...
 

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Daisy & Lucky's Mom, your post reminded me of another one.


We have stayed in some seriously.... SERIOUSLY.... sketchy hotels while traveling with dogs, because they were the only dog friendly, non-breed banning, accommodation in towns we were traveling through. The kind where you sleep on top of the covers. The worst one I can recall was when we opened the mini fridge and found an open, partially consumed bag of raw hotdogs dripping into the bottom tray.


I would not be surprised if some form of camper/RV happens in our future, especially if we encounter another Hotdog Motel situation...
I am cringing on your behalf!

We've always stayed in really nice dog-friendly hotels. The nicest was the one in Madison that designated a pet-friendly floor and allowed dogs to hang out in the lobby if on leash. We've also only traveled to larger cities. I'm now dreading ever trialing in a smaller town lest there is a Raw Hotdog Situation.
 

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If I didn't have dogs, we would be doing more traveling, seeing our kids more frequently, finish projects quicker. But then I realize that, without dogs, I probably wouldn't be healthy, physically and mentally. I simply can't and will never live without the company of dogs. There are days without them on travels and it feels part of me is amputated. If it is lasting more than a week (once in a blue moon), I am tempting to go to the nearest shelter and get one (and take 'it' home later).
They are totally worth the hardships of death and health issues, scares. Just touching them, working and playing with them, looking at them, saying their names even.......
 

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Well,my house and yard have definitely suffered some neglect.I had to lower my standards a bit(a lot).Why couldn't I have fallen in love with a small non shedding breed?One that doesn't like to dig and run through mud puddles.
 

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I was thinking about this and realizing, I truly don't miss most of the non-dog people who have dropped off the face of the earth as I've gotten really into doing dog-related stuff. That includes some family members.

That's probably wrong, isn't it.
 
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