German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
my puppy seems to be so obssesed with the treat I have in my hand he doesn't listen when i say sit or shake or whatever...

any suggestions? different incentives i can use?

oh also, how long should i expect a 15ish week old puppy to learn simple commands like shake or leave it and things like that? do you recommend longer sessions or short sessions of like 5-10 reps? should i mix up different commands or get the puppy to learn one and then do the next one?

thank you, this site is a god-send!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
751 Posts
You put a bunch of treats in your hand and show them to your dog and close your hand up and he will bite at it and paw at it and you just wait it out because he will then sit and look at you. Then you open your hand up and let him see the treats again then close up your hand again and wait until he sits. Now you have his attention and you can give him a reward for sitting ,laying down, or whatever. It works great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,300 Posts
I think you can do long sessions as long as you build up to long sessions by doing short sessions. For example: Sit for 15 secs > Sit for 30 secs > etc. Move onto making the sit longer after he gets the Sit for 15 secs down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,004 Posts
Myself I find taking the food out of the picture and putting on a table worked for my pup. He would not do anything but bit my hand and jump on me for the food. I also use a lot of clicker training that helped a lot.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,430 Posts
This is a wonderful game to impulse control around food:

You can spend a few minutes a day working with a handful of your puppy's kibble, or even feed an entire meal this way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,991 Posts
Your error is not in using treats for training, your error is that you accidently taught the dog to focus on the treats as a lure to train, rather than focus on you and use the treat as simply a reward.

Let me guess, your dog stares at the treats?

You will have to institute some serious patience for the next few days while you undo what has been taught (to stare at the treats). Forget about training the dog tricks or commands right now. Your dog needs to learn the most important thing she'll ever learn - to focus on you.

Stand perfectly still, don't give her any commands or guidance. Simply stand in a stationary position looking at your dogs eyes. Have your treats in a treat pouch for easy access, but have a small handful (5 - 10) of training treats. You want to be using something small like bil jac liver treats, charlie bear treats, etc.

Now all you do is WAIT. Your dog may do anything and everything to try to get the treat, do not correct or command her to do anything. Just WAIT for her to look you in the eyes. The SECOND she looks at you, give her a treat. Now she'll be even more focused on the treats. It may take longer the second, third, forth time. But very quickly, if you're patient and paying attention, she'll give you a quick eye glance. Immediately give her a verbal praise word (good, yes, etc) and give her a treat. Keep at this. Do it until you're sick of doing it. Do it all day for everything. Wants out of crate? Eye contact. Wants a toy, food, attention? Eye contact.

Once she's getting eye contact down, wait for her to sit AND look at you. Ideally she'll be in front of you, make eye contact, sit, then REWARD. If she's in front of you standing, step into her a little and she'll likely sit. If not, wait. Be patient. She will eventually sit, and once you reward you'll have begun the process of building the bridge between what's expected of her to earn the treat. If she focuses on the treat, she'll never get it. If she focuses on you, she goes through a quarter bag a training session. The key is to do this constantly. Never stop. Even once this is old news, start your training sessions with a couple minutes of focus. Eventually you'll have treats laying on the ground around her and she'll still focus on you.

The problem with treat training is that so many people use the treat to bribe the dog to perform, when in reality the dog should WANT to perform and you reward with the treat.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
751 Posts
your error is not in using treats for training, your error is that you accidently taught the dog to focus on the treats as a lure to train, rather than focus on you and use the treat as simply a reward.

Let me guess, your dog stares at the treats?

You will have to institute some serious patience for the next few days while you undo what has been taught (to stare at the treats). Forget about training the dog tricks or commands right now. Your dog needs to learn the most important thing she'll ever learn - to focus on you.

Stand perfectly still, don't give her any commands or guidance. Simply stand in a stationary position looking at your dogs eyes. Have your treats in a treat pouch for easy access, but have a small handful (5 - 10) of training treats. You want to be using something small like bil jac liver treats, charlie bear treats, etc.

Now all you do is wait. Your dog may do anything and everything to try to get the treat, do not correct or command her to do anything. Just wait for her to look you in the eyes. The second she looks at you, give her a treat. Now she'll be even more focused on the treats. It may take longer the second, third, forth time. But very quickly, if you're patient and paying attention, she'll give you a quick eye glance. Immediately give her a verbal praise word (good, yes, etc) and give her a treat. Keep at this. Do it until you're sick of doing it. Do it all day for everything. Wants out of crate? Eye contact. Wants a toy, food, attention? Eye contact.

Once she's getting eye contact down, wait for her to sit and look at you. Ideally she'll be in front of you, make eye contact, sit, then reward. If she's in front of you standing, step into her a little and she'll likely sit. If not, wait. Be patient. She will eventually sit, and once you reward you'll have begun the process of building the bridge between what's expected of her to earn the treat. If she focuses on the treat, she'll never get it. If she focuses on you, she goes through a quarter bag a training session. The key is to do this constantly. Never stop. Even once this is old news, start your training sessions with a couple minutes of focus. Eventually you'll have treats laying on the ground around her and she'll still focus on you.

The problem with treat training is that so many people use the treat to bribe the dog to perform, when in reality the dog should want to perform and you reward with the treat.
exactly !!! Wait it out
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top