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Discussion Starter #1
This is the only breed of dog that I like. I love training with Diesel and would like to continue taking care of more dogs. What are the proper steps I should take in order be able to achieve this.
 

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Prove that Diesel is breed worthy. Does he fit the standard for GSDs? Have an experience third party judge his conformation and temperament.
Get titles on him. SchH, obedience, tracking, herding, etc. Basically any type of title that can prove his working ability.
Once he turns two years old, get him health tested. At the very minimum, have his hips and elbows OFAd.

Study his pedigree extensively. Know pretty much everything you can learn about every dog in his pedigree. What kind of dogs they're known to produce, health issues, the kind of drive they tend to pass onto puppies, etc.

A good kennel is built on the bitches, so find a GOOD female, probably one that's already proven herself (not a puppy). Likely one that already has at least her hips cleared, has good drive and temperament, etc. The all-around GSD.

Then I'll just let the others come along, because I think my post is a bit scrambled and all over the place. Hopefully that'll be a good starting point for you, though.
 

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Well he's the first gsd that I've had. He looks perfect to me. I know he will succeed in any class we take. He's barely 4 months and is already in a training program. What I really want to know is if there is a set written standard in which it states how to take care of the female when she becomes pregnant?
 

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Is he AKC registered with a pedigree? If not, then don't breed him.

It's easy to say your dog looks perfect, when you're biased. I have a Pom, and even though I know he doesn't fit the standard, I still think he's perfect. He's a wonderful dog. Could probably make wonderful puppies. However, I know nothing of his background, and he has horrible conformation for a Pom.

If you want, take some photos of him stacked and put him in the critique section. A lot of people can tell a puppy's potential, as far as conformation goes, with a few good pics.
Here's a video on how to stack a GSD. Pretty much the same thing with a pup. (I wouldn't expect for him to be this cooperative when you try it, if you've never done it before).

Look at the flowchart on this page and follow it.
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/thinking-about-becoming-breeder/149386-should-i-breed-my-dog-flowchart.html

The only reason anyone should ever breed their dog is to try and better the breed as a whole.

As far as I know, there's no 'set' standard for whelping pups. There are a lot of people on here who are knowledgeable in that area, but you can never EXPECT anything to go as planned. Things can go wrong and you might lose the mom and/or her puppies, rush her in for an emergency c-section, she may reject the puppies, forcing you to hand raise them, etc. etc.

Breeding is not something to be considered lightly.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
He is registered with the AKC. Also, I do have his pedigree. What should I be looking for in it? That's pretty much what I would like to learn about. What could happen in worst case scenarios.
 

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Worst case scenarios? Here's a few....

During the actual breeding - if the female tries to run away or get away after they tie, she can rip the male's penis off.

During whelping - a puppy can be breached or stuck in the birth canal, blocking the way for all the other puppies. This can result in death of all puppies and the mom if she's not taken in ASAP for an emergency c-section.
Some dogs don't make good moms and will reject their puppies. Some may just walk away and refuse to feed them, others may attack and kill a few, or all of them.
Sometimes a female will have a false pregnancy and shows all signs of being pregnant - including weight gain - but will not have puppies.
Sometimes things can cause a pregnant female to absorb her puppies.

There's so much that can go wrong - it's near impossible to list them all here. Send Selzer a PM, since she's probably one of the more knowledgeable ones on what can go wrong.
 

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Wow, that's some serious consequences. I believe I need to do extensive research in many different subject in order to maximize the odds of being successful. Thanks for all your input so far.
 

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Wow, that's some serious consequences. I believe I need to do extensive research in many different subject in order to maximize the odds of being successful. Thanks for all your input so far.
:) That is great!

There are GSD rescues in Colorado. You can get more experience with the breed, perhaps even take in a mom and pups, learn about screening potential owners, etc, all while helping dogs and the breed, by volunteering!
 

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So glad you are taking the time to educate yourself Oscar! Keep an open mind and never stop learning!
 

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Oscar, I am glad you're taking the time to re-think your decision to breed. There is already an over population of unwanted dogs. Tens of thousands of dogs are put down A DAY because there aren't enough homes. Are you willing to accept that some of your puppies would have the same fate? Or are you willing to accept that for every puppy purchased from a breeder, a dog in a shelter is put to death?

Do you realize that breeding a dog costs you thousands of dollars per litter, a price which you are not going to make back in the sales of the puppies?

Oscar, you and I are neighbors. I live near Denver as well. If you are interested in getting more involved in the breed, I would gladly help you. There are many rescues that need volunteers with training, socializing, and fosters. As well as that, Colorado has some amazing breed clubs and working dog clubs. I recommend getting yourself and your dog involved with those.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yea I was looking at German Shepherd Rescue of the Rockies. Do you know anything about them? Also I still want to breed my dog. He's barely 4 months so there's a long way to go. For right now It would be greatly appreciated if you could help me get involved with said groups.
 

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Don't EVER breed a dog that is not titled. This goes beyond registration. What does your dog have that makes him worth breeding? Can you prove it? These are the things you have to consider.

WHY do you want to breed your dog? Here are some valid reasons:
-He has great conformation. If that's the case, show him and get his CH title.
-He's a great working dog. If this is the case, get involved in a dog sport such as agility or schutzhund.

I haven't had any personal experience with them, but any time spent volunteering is good time spent.
 

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What I don't get is that I want to breed my dog for the satisfaction. The only concern I have is to produce healthy puppies. If I better the breed good if not, oh well. The only thing I want to do is educate my self in achieving best possible puppies. The only way I wouldn't breed my dog is if I find health problems in him or if his temperament changes. By the way I am going to try and get titles for him. Not so that I can breed him, but because of the fun it will be.
 

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you don't breed dogs for human satisfaction. breed them
for the good of the dog. is your dog breed worthy? i think
that attitude "if i better the breed good if not, oh well" is totally
the wrong attitude.

What I don't get is that I want to breed my dog for the satisfaction. The only concern I have is to produce healthy puppies.

>>>> If I better the breed good if not, oh well. <<<<

The only thing I want to do is educate my self in achieving best possible puppies. The only way I wouldn't breed my dog is if I find health problems in him or if his temperament changes. By the way I am going to try and get titles for him. Not so that I can breed him, but because of the fun it will be.
 

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I agree with the above. It's simply irresponsible to breed any animal for nothing other than your own wants and desires.
 

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What I don't get is that I want to breed my dog for the satisfaction. The only concern I have is to produce healthy puppies. If I better the breed good if not, oh well. The only thing I want to do is educate my self in achieving best possible puppies. The only way I wouldn't breed my dog is if I find health problems in him or if his temperament changes. By the way I am going to try and get titles for him. Not so that I can breed him, but because of the fun it will be.

In my opinion, this is a very selfish statement. There are thousands of GSDs in shelters, many of which will get put to sleep - the ONLY valid reason to breed is to better the GSD breed.
 

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I disagree that it is irresponsible and wrong to breed for oneself. IMO that's one of the top reasons TO breed. How often on here are breeders lambasted for how many dogs they breed and sell but never hold back and train themselves? My pie-in-the-sky future goal is to earn a SchH3 (and all the other titles I do with my dogs) with a B-HOT dog. I couldn't really care less why other people breed or whether other people want me to breed or not. It's a free country. If you like my type of dog then you can probably get one and if not there are thousands of other breeders out there. I want to produce dogs that *I* feel are strong, healthy, correct, stable, courageous dogs so I can train them and exhibit them myself. The best breeders I have had the pleasure of meeting and spending time with are the ones that breed for themselves, when they are ready to carry on their bloodline and hold back a dog for their training.

Come on, on the most basic level *everyone* breeds for human satisfaction. That's why we have hundreds of years of domesticated animals, most of whom no longer perform duties required for our livelihood.
 
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