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Walking is great for both puppers and people alike! Our dogs both have access to a fenced in back yard on good days but we also live in the country and often are allowed to free "roam" providing we are outside with them as well. Though we do walks often in spring, summer and fall, it's a bit more challenging in winter with ice covered roads and snow.
I think OP was talking about a dog being walked at a human's pace. That is not exercise for a dog. It is movement, but does nothing much to contribute to a dog's overall physical health. Unless you are a jogger or runner, a human is not going to keep up at a dog's walking pace for anything more than a few minutes and that is the kind of walking that is beneficial to a dog's physical well being.
 
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For a very young puppy, a walk may be enough exercise to tire them out for a few hours.

But for an adolescent dog a walk just won't cut it. Unless you are speed-walking. And then you better go several miles in order to tire out your dog.

If you want a dog that will SLEEP (or at least be calm) while you are at work all day you need to TIRE THEM OUT.

Spend 15 - 20 minutes throwing the ball and having them RUN to get it and bring it back. I'm not talking about throwing it 20 or 30 feet. Get a Chuck it and throw that ball a good 50 - 100 FEET!!

Take the dog for a bike ride (with the proper equipment) and set the pace so they are trotting. Put in a good 20 - 30 minute round trip.

THOSE are ways to tire out your adolescent dog. Walks just aren't enough.
Hey, Laurie and Gang! Off the topic, but do I see Chinese Cresteds in your profile pics? I need to send you a pm! :)
 

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My pup, Lily, is 14 weeks old and sadly she tires me out long before I exhaust her. I live on 130acres and it's a km to the road so she's free until we get to the road and then she's on a Flexi lead. I walked her about 8km today, so she must have done at least 50% more. I'm confused why people don't consider the walk exercise? On a Flexi lead Lily runs 6m (20ft) in front then 6m behinds and around me, she's constantly running back and forth. I can lock the lead short when there's a car, rarely. Lily has also taken to jumping in the dam as we leave and as we return, in summer I'm sure she'll swim a lot, but cold at the moment, although she still jumped in when we had a frost the other day.

Lily is content to just lay next to me but she does love to get out. Eventually she'll come with me when I'm doing chores on the quad bike but not until she's older.
 

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I don't think this is an accurate statement. It's been said a few time, and I'm going to say it again. It depends on the dog. It aslo depends on the distance. Do you think walking a dog up the side if a mountain isn't exercise? I walk my GSD about a mile a day and she is completely fine. Also, puppies usually can't keep up with a bike. Non leash trained dogs are nerotic on bikes. You can't expect to hook a dog to a bike and be fine. What happens when he lunges for a rabbit? Just saying...
 

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My 7 (almos 8) months old has no interest in fetching.. we walk at fairly fast pace for an hour in the morning, 30 mins at lunch (if im not busy or on a conference call) and an hour before bed, we also play with the flirt pole for about 15 - 30 mins a day, and we also have puppy play dates several times a week around 3 - 4 nights a week we go play with other dogs for several hours... Im not going to make my girl run next to a bike she is too young for that wont do that till she is 18 - 24 months, and where she has no interest in fetching the only other option is our hour long (multiple times a day) walk. She gets sufficient exercise and she is of very health weight and size.
Just a little funny on fetching.... Our 10 year old Samoyed will not, would not fetch. We started with her when she was a baby, just as we have always done with our GSD's and she just looks at you like, well, go get it. She runs right up to the ball and sits down... or she picks it up and wanders around like how proud she is to have my toy... LOL ....
 

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I disagree: walking can be fine exercise, for dogs and humans both. 5 miles or more of walking at my pace is enough exercise for Beau, especially if there are hills. I like to do 8-10, but don’t always have time for that much. If I can’t do >5, we walk at least a mile, Fetch until he is breathing very hard and has started trotting instead of running on the retrieve, then walk at least another mile, until he’s breathing more easily. It’s usually ~2.5-3 miles of walking when we Fetch. He *loves* Fetch, so I try and do that frequently when it’s cool enough. But walking is good exercise for him if we can do the mileage.
 

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I used to be the primary caretaker for my elderly mother. She never could comprehend that after I took her for a walk at her pace, that it was then time for me to take a walk at my pace as the walk with her was exercise for her but did nothing to satisfy my exercise requirements. The same could be said for when she was still hiking until the age of 85 years. I would hike with her, take her back to the car and she would either wait there or I would take her home, and then I would go and get my exercise.

I suggest that those who think that walking at a human pace for a dog creates the physical benefits of exercise for the dog that it does for a human take some time to assist at an elderly care home. Walk around with the older patients, come back and let us know how you feel about it then.
 

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Just do what works for you and your dog. I use to try and have a plan for exercise, but I gave up long ago. Mine still get plenty, but there is a lot of randomness about it. We hike, swim, or just roam about in the NF. If your dogs happy your doing alright.
 

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I don't know. Both Sabs and Lex got exercise primarily from walking. And both were fit and happy. Up and down stairs and parkade ramps for 12 hours a night, in and out of the truck. In an average night we walked about 30 kms. I guess that's more then average, lol. We were not walking fast, we were checking doors and evicting vagrants, but both slept well.
Shadow with a week heart gets most of her exercise walking, on leash. We do play fetch but if I made her run flat out for 100 yards she may collapse.
I will say that keeping a disabled dog fit is infinitely challenging. I need to be careful at all times and while she is not as fit as I would like, somewhat lacking in muscle tone, she is kept fairly thin and has no issues on a 10 k hike.
 

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Walking definitely is exercise, it's purposeful movement that elevates the heart rate. In the summer time Gandalf may only get a 30 minute walk some days, and he is just fine, doesn't destroy anything in the house when left alone and sleeps all day. Of course we swim occasionally too, and when the weather gets nice we are much more active hiking and roller blading. My parents shepherd only exercise in the winter time was a long walk every day, and he survived just fine and never chewed up the house like you would expect a bored dog to do. I think this new generation of dog owners is too focused on "constantly entertaining" the dog, sometimes we need to just let a dog be a dog, get him out and take him around the block a couple times and call it a day. Let him out in his yard to just sniff around, Gandalf could lay on the porch for hours just watching the squirrels and birds. Dogs like most animals seem to enjoy routines and a short walk twice a day gives them some stability and certainty in their lives.
 

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I disagree that a dog walking at a human pace has an elevated heart rate.
 

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Hmm well disagree if you want but you're wrong. A dog at rest vs. a dog even standing up to move is going to have an ever so slightly elevated heart rate. You can even test it out yourself at home. Not sure if you've ever experienced a fit bit on yourself but you see this with people too, your laying down resting heart rate will be significantly lower than if you walk around for a bit and then take a reading. Here is a study on the increase in dogs heart rates while walking in water. Even in the water the dogs heart rates rose with increasing speeds, land is no exception.
https://studentjournal.hartpury.ac.uk/issue1/project-articles/caninehrtreadmill/

Table 2: A table to show the median heart rate and interquartile ranges of all dogs for speeds one to six.

Speed Median Heart Rate (bpm) Interquartile Range
Speed 1 131.50 24
Speed 2 131.00 32
Speed 3 143.00 21
Speed 4 156.00 48
Speed 5 158.00 48
Speed 6 157.00 41
 

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"ever so slightly elevated heart rate." are key words.

Low intensity walking exercise for a human is 50-60% above resting heart rate. I agree that such low intensity walking would only result in an ever so slightly elevated heart rate for a dog. More is needed to produce physical and mental fitness. Anxiety is inversely proportional to exercise. Too many dogs with behavioral problems that are directly related to a lack of exercise, too often a prong is advised as a cure, but I digress.
 

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I think it depends on the age and condition of your dog.

Is walking (enough) exercise for an energetic 2 year old dog? Of course not! He/she probably needs to run offleash a few times a week until tongue is hanging out.
(In the same way, my teens don't find walking to be tiring at all ... unless they hike all day.)

Is walking enough exercise for a middle-aged dog like mine?
I think so, yes. Mine walks (& trots) 4 -5 miles a day and is very chill the rest of the time.

Is walking enough exercise for an elderly dog?
My neighbor's 14-year old border collie struggles to keep up with his master for one loop around the block...
it's a little sad to see. But they look happy enjoying their outside time.

One of my tests was the backyard play test... if we got back from a walk, I would "invite" him to play by dashing a bit in the backyard or I would throw a ball. If he played "chase" with me, or went for the ball with a lot of energy, then I knew that he wasn't tired. If he just looked at me, or ran for the ball and laid down with it, then I knew that walk had tired him out!
 

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True, depends on the dog. But for a high energy 1 year old, it's definitely not enough. On days that my dog don't get to play off leash or don't get to rollerblade, normally with my daily timetable, I'm able to walk him twice a day for a total of 2-3 miles. The tiredness of walking twice a day vs once a day + off leash/rollerblading are definitely different. Walking counts as very little exercise for my dog physically. That being said, walking with my dog counts as little to moderate physical exercise for me, and it's more of a structure exercise for my dog.

This is an article I came across a while ago, and I must say I agree with the author.

http://www.jscottdogtraining.com/walking-dog-doesnt-count-exercise/
 

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Walking on a leash at my pace is a warm up. A good way to prevent injuries.
For a breed bred to work all day with a deep chest and large lungs, it is not sufficient.
Yes, it might elevate the heart rate, but it doesn't do much for muscles and lungs.
 

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Walking on a leash at my pace is a warm up. A good way to prevent injuries.
For a breed bred to work all day with a deep chest and large lungs, it is not sufficient.
Yes, it might elevate the heart rate, but it doesn't do much for muscles and lungs.
I agree about the warmup. Good cooldown too to prevent injury. I'll walk Mei before and after we run hills at the park or play with the flirt pole. She gets great exercise with the flirt pole. She sprints SO fast to get it
 
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