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So - this is not a GSD, I am sorry to say, but this is probably the most active and knowledgeable dog forum I'm on, so I'm asking.

Neb (husky/lab/beagle on his mom's side, unknown for dad) is 12. He's started to slow down, but still gets mistaken for a puppy on occasion.

We went to some cabins near Algonquin Provincial Park this weekend as Saturday was our anniversary and today (Sunday) is my husband's birthday. It is hot - like 30C before humidity. We spent most of Saturday (late morning-evening) outside, swimming (Neb came in) and sitting out reading our books. The boys were on tie outs (Neb wanders) and had access to shade and water, though Neb spent most of the time in the sun.

He has a history of twice last year eating lots of charcoal and puking while camping. However, he didn't eat a lot of that or grass that we noticed, and we tried to monitor.

When we were inside cooking dinner, Neb puked up kibble (got fed late afternoon) three times in the space of a minute and a half. Of course when we forget paper towel! He was fine for a few hours then until bedtime, when he puked three times in the bedroom. He puked once more while we were asleep and per my husband (who is a light sleeper) kept getting up and pacing. We let them out of the bedroom this morning and he drank a bunch of water, looked miserable, so I took him out without the other two, he pooped (a bit soft) and threw up water twice. NOT bile. So I said to my husband, we're not feeding him, it's not like he's hungry and puking bile. We obviously didn't go into the park to hike, we headed home - he threw up once in the car. When we got back to the city we went straight to the veterinary emerg. So around 10 pukes in...15 hours?

We'd also given him some children's gravol last night and then again this morning.

When they were able to see him (and it's contactless) they noted he was lethargic, painful in the tummy, and dehydrated. We elected to do bloodwork but not x-rays. We thought he had heat exhaustion, the e-vet didn't seem sold on that.

Anyways - I'm having the bloodwork emailed, but the only thing abnormal was potassium, because he'd been puking so much. They said sub-q fluids wouldn't be enough to rehydrate him based on that bloodwork. So he's staying overnight on IV.

I just called to pay the deposit (they never called me back) and he's sleeping peacefully. We are waiting to see how he recovers to decide whether we do x-rays tomorrow morning, or continue to monitor at home before going to our own vet. But he has his annual in July and we would've been doing bloodwork anyways.

He was actually supposed to have his annual months ago, but COVID cancelled it, and then when stuff started to open up again they were crazy booked. I'd been trying to wait until I could go in with him, sigh, but had resigned myself to a contactless appointment.

Anyways, the e-vet said it could be a mass (I presume in the stomach).

Does anyone have any experience based on his presentation? I'm trying not to worry too much, but of course I'm worried.

Thanks and sorry to write such a long post!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Got the vet's record.

On tenting (possibly bloodwork too?) they said 5% dehydrated. And -

CBC - Hemoconcentrated, otherwise WNL
Chem - Hypokalemia. All else WNL

He's also been trembly
 

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Sounds a little bit bloaty or an obstruction to me? But I'd have thought your vets would have thought of that....x-rays should show if either is the case.
 

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The vet thinks in a dog his size (~40lbs) she'd feel bloating, plus, it's been over 15hrs and he's not dead - also I don't think he has that GSD deep chest. She thinks obstruction is unlikely - and we can't think of what it would be. He generally doesn't show interest in things like socks or something (though he did eat some cans once!).

I just talked to them again, he went out (slowly) to pee and came back and is sleeping. He was trembling so they covered him up with a blanket. He's being a very good boy and isn't in a cage, he's sleeping in a little bed in the centre of the back area where the vets do patient work.
 

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Oh and she confirmed (her notes said this, I must've been mistaken) that he is not exhibiting pain signs when palpitated. He does have a higher pain tolerance so she's going to monitor and maybe add some pain meds.
 

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Sorry, just saw this now. He's home and feeling a lot better (and sleeping). They said he was in good spirits at the hospital (and everyone said what a good boy he was!). They suspect gastroenteritis secondary to heat exhaustion. He's been keeping down food and small amounts of water.

As long as he continues like this and is able to start eating normal meals, we won't do further diagnostics.

All I have to say is, I will no longer trust him to move into the shade when it's hot out - I'll make him do so!
 
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Glad to hear he's doing better!
I was thinking bloat, too. I've heard of a number of dogs that have bloated after playing in water, or playing with water coming out of a hose. I don't know if it's the weight of water in the stomach that causes it, or something else.

Just putting that out there as an FYI after having a close friend lose his GSD to bloat after swimming in a lake... 😢
 

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That's really good to know Sunsilver (Agis played a lot in the water, it was his first exposure to a lake, which was VERY exciting). It doesn't seem to be that for Neb, but I am debating calling our vet as he's quieter than usual (though ate and drank at home this morning and kept it down).
 

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That's really good to know Sunsilver (Agis played a lot in the water, it was his first exposure to a lake, which was VERY exciting). It doesn't seem to be that for Neb, but I am debating calling our vet as he's quieter than usual (though ate and drank at home this morning and kept it down).
yeah and I also remember seeing a story on here about someone whose dog bloated and it was sick for a few days before treatment. Bloat itself can take a while to become life-threatening, it seems; it's when the torsion (stomach flipping) occurs that it's like...a major emergency.
 

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I saw that too. But Neb is recovering so I really don't think it's bloat.
 

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Yes, I wasn't thinking that for your dog, since he's recovering, but wanted to put that out there because it's summer, and a lot of people are taking their dogs in the water, or letting them play with the water from the hose .
 

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@Sunsilver I'm glad you did, because it's something we'll be aware of in the future.
 

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Glad to hear he's doing better!
I was thinking bloat, too. I've heard of a number of dogs that have bloated after playing in water, or playing with water coming out of a hose. I don't know if it's the weight of water in the stomach that causes it, or something else.

Just putting that out there as an FYI after having a close friend lose his GSD to bloat after swimming in a lake... 😢
Ugh I worry about that so much. Willow loves swimming and she's got such a thick coat that I feel bad keeping her out of the water when it's really hot on our walks/hikes, but yeah, she GULPS water down as soon as she gets in the water, so much that she coughs with every mouthful. And then when she gets out she gets the zoomies. Every time. I don't think it's a behavior I can fix, I just have to keep her out of the water which breaks my heart. :-(
 

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If the water is dirty, they can get infections from it, especially giardia. Any water your dog drinks should be fit for human consumption, or at least fit for humans to swim in! In a long-coated dog, I'd also worry about skin infections if the coat doesn't dry out completely. There was also a poster on here whose dog had a very bad smell. With the help of the posters, he (or she) figured out it was due to the dog swimming nearly every day, and not drying out in between. I don't recall if it was a chronic skin infection, or just bacteria growing in his coat.

Both of my dogs got very bad gastrointestinal infections from falling into a beaver pond once. Ranger decorated the walls with diarrhea, and as I was down on my knees cleaning the rug, Star proceeded to vomit on it! :rolleyes:

Arrgh...hate to sound like a Debbie Downer, but swimming and drinking from streams, lakes and puddles has its risks!
 

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Oh believe me, I know. I live in western Montana though so like 99% of the water is pure snowmelt and there's not a lot of time/space for "stuff" to get into it by the time it gets here (just wildlife and yeah, beavers). If I do let her swim, I'm sure to let her swim in moving water vs. standing water (I read that you lower your risk of getting bugs that way: the turbidity keeps the bug count lower per unit than in standing water, where it has the chance to multiply). I don't like her drinking out of the main river here at all, or out of puddles/ponds, but I don't worry much about her drinking from/swimming in the mountain creeks (except for the gulping thing). I rarely hear of dogs getting giardia around here but I'm sure it's possible.

Also since it's Montana, the air is very dry, so I don't worry about skin infections. Her coat does take longer to dry versus like..my hair (which is long but dries in about 20 minutes outside) but she's always dry before bed. She isn't long-coated: I always say she's husky coated, just has a really plush, soft undercoat that soaks up water like a sponge.
 
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