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I would never use that ER.....
 

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FIVE times?!? That's just disgusting. If the dog was being that aggressive, and you have to swing it somewhere, swing it into the goshdarn crate sitting right there and slam the door until you can calm down and come back with a reasonable approach.

Oh, and that defense about revenge posting. In my experience, people who cry revenge are the ones out there making enemies in the first place.

That was just disgusting to watch. On so many levels.
 

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Sickening, just sickening.

Even IF the dog was aggressive as claimed, that's no way to treat it. These are supposed to be trained professionals, have they never heard of a catch pole? Or gloves? Let alone a little thing called a muzzle?! :rolleyes:

Jeepers creepers to pick up a dog by the leash is bad enough but to slam it into a wall just boggles my mind.

Look at the size of dog, it's already on the ground so obviously it's not ripping out throats unless you're 2' tall. Use a catch pole and put it in a pen!

If that was my dog I'd be sueing them for all the money in the world and I'd make sure the world knew what happened.
 

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Wow I cant believe that! And the dog was wearing one of those collars to prevent it from chewing/licking at a wound so chances are it was already freaked out having that on and no way would he probably be able to get a bite on the person only if she took her hand and put in inside the collar near is mouth... Sorry this is just disgusting, its clear abuse and I would never go to that ER. I would have sued for everything that place had and made them shut down
 

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There went his career. The vet would have better off apologizing and firing the employee. It's a tiny dog. I don't care how aggressive it is, it can't possibly be THAT hard to handle. Give me a break. She was clearly trying to teach it a lesson. Be a big bad dog trainer.


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That was uncalled for, but to the poster who asked if the vet had ever heard of a muzzle, that's a laugh. We deal with a LOT of aggressive dogs at our practice. Muzzles still have to be put ON the dog, and with some animals it is impossible to do.

And yes, smaller aggressive dogs are MUCH harder to handle than large ones. They turn faster, they strike quicker, and you can't use multiple people to restrain different body parts because there's just not enough room around the dog. There are dogs that are impossible to get a catchpole on. Those are the dogs that we use the catchpoles through the top of the cage to corral into a crate, which we cover with a plastic bag and gas until they're sedated enough to do an IM injection of sedative JUST to do a rabies shot.

This woman's actions were not in line with how to deal with an aggressive dog, but I just want to make perfectly clear to all the forum-goers who are not in the profession that we see animals that behave like absolute idiots all the time. Not all dogs are well-mannered and trained; there are many dogs that will legitimately go for your face or any body part they can reach. I've been bitten only once by a dog at the office, and it was a chihuahua mix. He was fast and deadly and had to be quarantined for a week because he was not UTD on rabies. During that time he could not be handled by anyone at the practice because he was so aggressive. We had to herd him from kennel to kennel when he pottied and we could not bathe him because he was so aggressive. We never slung him up on a leash and slammed him against the wall, but by golly we all would have liked to.
 

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Marbury: I can totally understand your side of the story BUT if my dog was at the vets and they couldn't handle it safely I expect them to call me and not slam the dog into the wall repeatedly :mad:

I know of so many other horror stories like this that my blood is boiling right now.

And I have also seen technicians that have absolutely no clue about dog behavior and ignore all the warning signs before the dog finally bites them. These animals are already sick and stressed out.
 

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That was uncalled for, but to the poster who asked if the vet had ever heard of a muzzle, that's a laugh. We deal with a LOT of aggressive dogs at our practice. Muzzles still have to be put ON the dog, and with some animals it is impossible to do.

And yes, smaller aggressive dogs are MUCH harder to handle than large ones. They turn faster, they strike quicker, and you can't use multiple people to restrain different body parts because there's just not enough room around the dog. There are dogs that are impossible to get a catchpole on. Those are the dogs that we use the catchpoles through the top of the cage to corral into a crate, which we cover with a plastic bag and gas until they're sedated enough to do an IM injection of sedative JUST to do a rabies shot.

This woman's actions were not in line with how to deal with an aggressive dog, but I just want to make perfectly clear to all the forum-goers who are not in the profession that we see animals that behave like absolute idiots all the time. Not all dogs are well-mannered and trained; there are many dogs that will legitimately go for your face or any body part they can reach. I've been bitten only once by a dog at the office, and it was a chihuahua mix. He was fast and deadly and had to be quarantined for a week because he was not UTD on rabies. During that time he could not be handled by anyone at the practice because he was so aggressive. We had to herd him from kennel to kennel when he pottied and we could not bathe him because he was so aggressive. We never slung him up on a leash and slammed him against the wall, but by golly we all would have liked to.
That's my exact point. There are MANY ways to deal with an aggressive dog; you don't need to resort to such barbaric techniques such as hanging and slamming the body. There was NO reason that what happened in the video had to happen and NO excuse for it.

I agree vets and of course the techs DO deal with aggressive animals all the time This should not have been an out of the ordinary "I don't know what to do!" moment for the staff.

As for the muzzle, if the dog has an owner get them to muzzle the dog before even walking in. If it's a stray, catch pole and either restraint or crate and gas as you've already mentioned then muzzle it even while sedated if it's that dangerous. I'm sure 75% or higher of the animals seen by vets are aggressive either due to pain or being scared.

My groomer is a former vet tech. I went in once with my dog for an appointment and they had a little terrier (maybe 12-15 lbs.) on her grooming table, this dog was demonic with rage. Foaming and snarling like a banshee, they had a small cone on it and one groomer held it upright while my groomer was clipping its nails. This dog would literally have gone for their throats if possible, it was THAT mad. There was no yelling or fear from the groomers. There was no yelping in pain from the dog so it obviously wasn't being hurt, they quickly and quietly did the nails and then let it down. After 30 seconds or so the dog calmed down and they took the cone off and he jumped on their chests and was licking their faces and they praised and pet him.

Animals are animals, they act in instinct and you can't attribute human emotions to them especially when they're pushed to their limits so getting mad or upset at a dog for being aggressive is like getting mad or upset at a 1 year old for misbehaving. Does it happen, yes and it's natural to get upset but that doesn't mean you take out your feelings on the child.

My comment about the muzzle was directed at this scenario, not at vets in general.

Personally I adore my vet. I truly do and he has my highest respect, he's a wonderful person and a wealth of knowledge. There are more good than bad vets out there, I've seen both and just keep supporting the good ones.
 

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Ugh, makes my stomach hurt.
 

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how bout you put a muzzle on it, and not slam the dog into the wall, this is disgusting..........morons
 

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I agree, and sometimes those types of dogs will allow their owners to put muzzles on them. Sometimes... even the owners can't get close to the dog's face or head. What then? When a team of three professionals and the owner can't muzzle the dog, that's an issue.

Personally, I question why those dogs are still alive when there are thousands of perfectly non-lethal dogs in shelters waiting for homes or euthanasia, but hey... I guess they just HAD to have that yorkie in the window at the petshop. *d'oy*
 

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There is NO excuse for this!
I've seen the full video and it's sick, and no one edited it as they claimed.

15lb dog vs very large, angry vet tech? No excuse, period.
 

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I have seen little dogs in a rage like this too....and those little teeth can certainly bite and rip skin....

This is a freaking dachshund....this kind of handling - the hanging and hitting him into the wall could cause SERIOUS damage to his spine...those things are really delicate.

There is no justification for hitting the wall with the dog AT ALL. I agree a second person should have the body of the dog held while the first holds it taut on a leash for whatever treatment was prescribed.

Lee
 

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I like it that the vets I use let me be there during everything save x-rays and some surgeries. But the ER will take a dog into the back for bloodwork. I don't like that at all. And I go to different 24 hour clinics to avoid that.

I understand that some people make their animals harder to manage, and I do not argue if they want to hold the dogs themselves, but often they go ahead and have me hold my own dog for things that might hurt.

Still, there are people that are not suited for the work but have the job. Hopefully, the vet is dismissing the woman, but does not want to say anything publicly for fear of reprisals and lawsuits. Employers have to be very careful in how they manage everything to do with employees.

I did not get to see the video, my flash player crashed, but I wonder how that video came into the public domain. If I was a vet and had my own people videotaped, I might submit such a video to police authorities so that charges could be filed, but how would it go anywhere else?
 

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REPULSIVE!!! No excuse for handling the situation like that.
 

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I know right where that clinic is. We used to go to church near there and have been to the mall that the reporter mentioned in the video. I was yelling out loud when I watched. This is horrifying. I feel like picketing up there!!!


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That video shown by the news station is misleading. In that video I could ALMOST see the technician being in the right (let me defend before screaming for murder)

I have handled a few EXTREMELY aggressive small dogs in practice. Dogs that won't let you anywhere near them. Even with a catch pole they spin around. Throwing them in a crate is fine and dandy for the moment, by how are they actually able to be treated and handled like that?

For a few small cases (one that clearly comes to mind is a lhaso mix dog), we had to double leash with two slip leashes to give better control. For the lhaso, he began SCREAMING, flailing and launching himself in the air. Went wild. The only way we were able to control him, front feet lifted off the ground so he was unable to flail as much, tech ran up behind him and slipped a muzzle on. So yes, sometimes these little guys when they are acting that extreme DO go air born, a lot of times they launch themselves, sometimes lifting them up slightly is the only way to make them hold still well enough to grab control. No, it's NEVER nice to see a dog lifted up by a leash. But from someone that has handled a dog flailing and acting that wild, aggressive, and dog NEEDS to be examined and treated, sometimes you need to do what works now.

So that being said, that video was misleading. It was grainy and blurry. The dog was obviously EXTREMELY agitated, flailing, fighting, like stated above. I see the tech lift the dog. Sometimes mild lifting helps remove them from a situation that could be dangerous, prevent from flailing in an area that could cause damage. Perhaps the tech was just trying to get the dog out of whatever room it was in so someone else could help restrain. Perhaps she didn't want him flailing into the kennel door. At that point the dog swings. Again, from this video hard to see what caused the motion. The dog's movements could of easily caused him to swing through the air. So, don't agree with the dog being lifted so high in the air, but since I have dealt with dogs acting like that I understand it is very hard to control them and sometimes force needs to be used that isn't the nicest look. That was a very short clip, COULD be misleading.

SO, I went to youtube, and searched for it. There I saw the whole clip. Even if it was edited, even if it was taken out of context, there is ZERO reason that dog should of been swung the way it was. It should of promptly been taken to an area where a second person would of obviously been retired to maintain proper control. If you don't have a second technician you get the doctor. This tech was so far out of line it disgusts me, makes the rest of us look bad, and she should be fired immediately.

 
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