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Just thought I'd post this. I hadn't heard/thought much about it but one of the IMOM dogs might have had an episode:

http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_vestibular_disease.html

WHAT ON EARTH IS THE VESTIBULAR APPARATUS?

In a nutshell, the vestibular apparatus is the neurological equipment responsible for perceiving one's body's orientation relative to the earth (determining if you are upside-down, standing up straight, falling etc.) and informing ones eyes and extremities how they should move accordingly.

The vestibular apparatus allows us to walk, even run, on very uneven ground without falling, helps us know when we need to right ourselves, and allows our eyes to follow moving objects without becoming dizzy.
 

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Too had episodes of vestibular disease the last two or three years of her life. She ended up in the hospital once, the other episodes were short, maybe 15 or 20 minutes, I always held her until the symptoms subsided and she was steady on her feet.

Her eyes would look like they were sucked into her head, she'd keel over (I believe it was to the left), she had head tilts, and then after a few minutes, it would slowly be over. They never could determine exactly what was causing it (and from what I understand, even if they figured it out there wasn't anything they could do for it).

I always thought that in some ways it's similar to vertigo in humans.

Mansha's I'll Be Siri Us Too - 12/22/90 - 6/13/03
 

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It can also appear in puppies. I had one pup eons ago that had it. If it does go away and the tilt goes away, it can still reoccur from what I was told.
 

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My shep x that I just lost had a nasty round of this disease in late May. I didn't know what it was and thought he was a goner. My vet told me that it would take some intense effort at his age but he thought he could pull through. He was disoriented - walk was very wobbly as if he'd been drinking canine Budweiser, head tilt to the side, sort of a vague look in the eyes, and just "off" in terms of orientation. After a couple weeks of slow recovery, he got better but it was effort - had to hold food and water for him for the first few days. My vet told me that basically, the whole world in his view was upside down, that it wouldn't change, but that he would relearn how to cope. I think a lot of dogs that suffer this get put down as the symptoms are scary - thank God for good veterinarians!
 

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I had a dog who had an episode of this when she was 9. It did not last long and adjusted with no problems. Was scary at the time though!!!!
 

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A friend's dog had several episodes in the last three years of her life (She recently passed at 16+), the last left her with a sideways walk and a bit of a tilt.
She did however keep her happy spirit!
 

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this is a really scary thing to watch in your dog. Lando had it once. it cleared with time, but wow, those eyes flitting back and forth and the not being able to walk- creepy creepy creepy.

Lando also had something that looked just like this without the eye nystagmus that turned out to be flagyl related. over-use of flagyl can cause neurological problems. just as scary.

Paige
 

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Sneaker had it, about 2 months before her 14th birthday. We thought she'd had a stroke and rushed her to the vet thinking it was the end. Our vet knew immediately what it was. She spent several days in the hospital and when she came home she was still pretty bad. It took weeks to fully recover, but she only lived about 8 months longer.
 

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Cassidys Mom,

Magnum went through the same. I was so upset taking him to the vet as I was sure this time, this was it. He sent him home immediately but told me I would be doing some intensive nursing.
I literally slept on the patio with him as he was so disoriented, I knew it would be tough to get him outside to use the grass. I wondered if my other two dogs would opt to stay in or join us - we were all out there together! LOL
After three nights out there, he was well enough to come inside but had that sort of walk forward and to the left that someone else noted. I lost him last month, three months later.
As an unrelated aside, your photo entry was adorable.
 

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Many vets call this a stroke when it isn't - strokes in canines are not common and I've read that it is rare due to a mechanism in the circulatory system in canines (can't remember what it is called) that prevents either clots occuring or, if they occur, getting to the brain. I had a client whose 15yo GR (Hunna) had a number (5) of these episodes with the exact same symptoms and until a new locum at her vet said it was vestibular disease, she was always told it was a stroke. Many dogs get PTS by owners given this diagnosis, as the owner thinks in the terms of the effect of a stroke on a human.

It is scary to see. I had another client with a JR mix (Bernie) who called into my house on the way home from the vet after his second episode and the eye flickering was the reason she realised what was going on - both dogs made full recoveries although Hunna was at 15yo showing signs of senility anyway.
 

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Our female GSD Judd who is 12 years old gave us a good scare this week. Tuesday at 4 in the morning I woke up hearing noises from the large crate she sleeps in during the night (the crate's door is always open). I went to see what was going on and there she was still laying down but her body was like very stressed and she couldn't get up. Her eyes were going from left to right very rapidly. My husband tried to put her on her legs and for a little while she was not able to stand and after that she had difficulty walking straight. It reminded me a bit of one of our previous dog who had epilepsy for the last years of her life. As soon as my vet's clinic opened I called and went there at 10 o'clock. We had a very bad feeling that it was the brain and that we wouldn't take her home.

After examining her my vet saved the day by explaining to us what our dog was suffering from. So, we took her home and let her relax in her crate. By noon she was alright. On Wednesday she even started to show her teeth to our younger GSD Wyatt letting him know that she was still the boss ;-)
On Tuesday afternoon though she had an episode of about 15 minutes and an other one of 5 minutes during supper. But, since Tuesday night she lays down in her crate and doesn't come out. If she stands up, she will make a u-turn to stay in her crate.

So, she didn't eat at all on Friday. She sleeps almost all of the time. I keep a close eye on her all the time and I sleep right besides her.
We went back this morning to the vet to have a geriatric blood test, we will have the results on Monday.
Has anybody had a dog who had an episode lasts that long? t's keeling me to see her like that. I wish I could take her incomfort away.

Good news though, my husband just gave her some grounded beef and rice and she ate all that very fast.
Please, share your experience with us, we would really appreciate it.
 

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Originally Posted By: Claire222Has anybody had a dog who had an episode lasts that long?
Sneaker was at the vet's for several days. Like you, we thought she had a stroke and when we drove her to the vet we thought it was for the last time. She couldn't even stand up for a few seconds before falling down. When she came home her eyes weren't rolling back in her head anymore, but she still couldn't walk straight, and would bounce off the walls as she went down the hall to go outside. She still had a pronounced head tilt too. It took almost 6 weeks for a full recovery. Our vet said most dogs recover, but some don't completely lose the head tilt. She was almost 14 years old at the time, and lived another 8 months.
 

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my Lando had this happen twice. She took several weeks to completely recover. be patient. i am glad that your vet knew that it wasn't a stroke... that is a common error. i fed her by hand when she was sick.
 

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i would imagine this would be hard to diagnose, because some dogs may show typical symptoms of this disease and some might just show one or two symptoms. as we all know they are all different.
just like the sypmtoms of people having heart attacks, the classic symptoms are not the same in everyone. some people might have pain in the back instead of classic chest/arm pains, etc.

only a sharp vet would be able to diagnose this problem first visit, and just by symptoms, etc. it could also be mistaken for another neurological issue.

debbie
 

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Thanks to everyone for answering me! Give a hug from me to your 4 legged friends.
Saturday afternoon Judd ate again a good portion of grounded beef and rice. My husband even took her outside for a few minutes holding her by her collar. She stays in her crate all the time, sleeping on and off. This morning she had steak again and we give her 7-up with a syringe regularly.
I think she will miss all those special treats when she'll be better.
Right now she is laying down in her crate besides me and is relaxing. She is more relax now, her head is still tilting but the eyes are more stable.
I'll keep everyone posted on her condition.
I speak French so, sometimes my sentences may look funny but I think you understand me anyway ;-)
 

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Good news, the blood test came back and everything is perfect.

Judd ate this morning and also at the end of the afternoon. We have to bring her the food because she always stays in her crate. Once this morning, by herself she got up and walk to the bathroom just a few feet away where the large bowl of water is. Don't worry, I held her by her collar so she could be more secure. She drank almost all of the water.
We have to encourage her and pull her out of her crate to take her outside but she can walk on her own, we are holding her with a short leash. She even barked two times at our neighbour.
Should I be worry that she is always laying down since Thursday night? She is awake for good periods of time and she also sleeps from time to time.
Those are the longest days of my life I think ;-(
 

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Update on Judd's condition.....
Judd has been taking some antibiotics since Thursday night to help her with her digestion, her poop was just plain liquid until then. She didn't poop at all on Friday and finally on Saturday, she went and it was solid. When my husband comes home, she gets out of her crate to greet him. She is finally improving, we take her for 10 minutes walks three times a day since yesterday and it feels so good to be outside with her, tahing deep breaths and enjoying those small little steps she is making. She is pulling on the leash and walking at a nice pace, Her head is still tilting on the left side though. She had the opportunity to bark at a cat who was laying down on the sidewalk ;-)
An other good sign is that she started to show het teeth again to Wyatt (2 years old GSD) when he is too close to her crate
We just have to keep some doors closed so she won't go iin the stairs or on our bed.
I'll let you know how she does in a few weeks.
By the way, should someone's dog get this disease please don't hesitate to contact me, I'll be more than happy to answer all your questions.
 
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