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How common is artificial insemination in breeding dogs and why would you choose that over natural breeding?
 

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Pretty common. The breeders I know don't "choose" it over natural. They choose it because the male is not physically available when it's time to breed.
 

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I heard it is the preferred method of many conformation breeders of other random breeds such as Poodles or Collies.
 

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At the facility where I work they’ve used it most commonly for international studs, less often for solid producers that are deceased, and on rare occasions, for young studs that have “performance anxiety”...
 

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Those were two of the breeds mentioned. They claimed all breeders use breeding stands and AI only.They entered the conversation because they were of the Shop, Don't Adopt crowd and also belonged to a breed preservationist group. I can support both of those things but when they touted that they took all breedings into their own hands and never gave their dogs an opportunity to breed, I found their behavior in direct conflict with their words. How do you preserve breeds that can't or won't breed, or should you even try?
 

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I used it for a breeding when the male was across the country. Shipping has become difficult. The female was bred naturally for her second breeding.
 

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These people were talking about AI with their own dogs living in the same household.
 

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How common is artificial insemination in breeding dogs and why would you choose that over natural breeding?
I believe AI is cheaper as well. I know that for horses they do it for distance and money reasons. I didn't know they did it for dogs, but it makes sense, especially if the stud is cross country/countries. It's more convenient to have it shipped then to go there.
 

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A fellow with a pup out of Karma and Mufasa (my breeding), wanted to breed his bitch and gave me a call. I convinced him to wait until she was two and to call me. I had a young male that was not related. His bitch was in heat and he brought her out. My boy had had one successful breeding at that point, and didn't think it would be an issue.

The bitch turned into a noodle. When she wasn't trying to kill him, she was laying on her back showing her belly. We tried for a while, and then I told him to come back in two days. We tried again. Come back in two days, we tried again. I suggested progesterone testing. But offered to have him come back in two days. Both of us work full time, but we were trying. Finally the day I had to put Ninja down, I told him to take my dog. Bring him back in two days. Make an appt. at Animal Clinic Northview and if the progesterone test says she is ready, then have them AI her. He did all that. And when he got them to his house, within half an hour, they were tied.

There is nothing wrong with AI. But if it has to be done, if dogs cannot breed naturally, or have puppies naturally without C-sections as a breed-thing, I don't see the issue. I guess some breeds with narrow hips and large heads routinely need C-sections to whelp. I've heard some can't mate naturally either, but I don't know how true that is.
 

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I know that my breeder has one bitch that has had a few litters and he said she just won't breed naturally, so they have always done AI with her. It happens.
 

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Mostly out of convenience and availability of the male also many don’t want to send their female long distances if need be. Some want to try hoping to ensure pregnancy if dogs had missed breedings in the past it is option that they may wish to try. Some choose frozen semen for dogs who have passed on years and years ago.
 

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I have an extremely strong - in every way, physically, mentally, libido - male. He has done multiple live breedings and gets the job done very effectively. When the female has been squirrelly, did not seem ready (owner did not want to incur expense of progestrone) or has had repro problems, it is off to the repro vet we go. Two females we tried to breed had serious prior repro problems and did not carry pups to term, others bred AI got litters. There is an advantage to a TCI in being able to evaulate the quality of the semen and the repro tract of the female.

Lee
 

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for some breeds that's the only way to actually get the female pregnant. Perfect example are our english bullies.. they tend to be so top heavy, and their hind legs are so short, that mounting and locking just isn't possible MOST of the time. We had our original female AI'ed at the vet for like $100 (on top of the stud fee). The stud's owner brought him there, the vet took them into the back room, i read a magazine in the waiting area, and boom out they came.
 

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There is nothing wrong with AI. But if it has to be done, if dogs cannot breed naturally, or have puppies naturally without C-sections as a breed-thing, I don't see the issue. I guess some breeds with narrow hips and large heads routinely need C-sections to whelp. I've heard some can't mate naturally either, but I don't know how true that is.
This kind of thing tells me that some breeds need their standards seriously adjusted if they are incapable of mating/birthing naturally. One that comes to mind is the English Bulldog, which used to look more like this "new" bulldog breed: Olde English Bulldogge - Wikipedia. Any breed should be capable of reproducing on its own accord. Makes me sad that that's not the case.

And when I say "birthing", I mean giving birth normally outside of an emergency during pregnancy--should not require a C-section on a routine basis in other words.
 

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This kind of thing tells me that some breeds need their standards seriously adjusted if they are incapable of mating/birthing naturally. One that comes to mind is the English Bulldog, which used to look more like this "new" bulldog breed: Olde English Bulldogge - Wikipedia. Any breed should be capable of reproducing on its own accord. Makes me sad that that's not the case.

And when I say "birthing", I mean giving birth normally outside of an emergency during pregnancy--should not require a C-section on a routine basis in other words.
I know. I knew a lady who owned several English bulldogs, and she was first one to tell me that. It is pretty odd.
 

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This kind of thing tells me that some breeds need their standards seriously adjusted if they are incapable of mating/birthing naturally. One that comes to mind is the English Bulldog, which used to look more like this "new" bulldog breed: Olde English Bulldogge - Wikipedia. Any breed should be capable of reproducing on its own accord. Makes me sad that that's not the case.

And when I say "birthing", I mean giving birth normally outside of an emergency during pregnancy--should not require a C-section on a routine basis in other words.
I have to stand with you on this. When a breed becomes that extreme, it is time for breeders to rethink what they have done.

And for these breeders choosing to use AI with their females with never giving nature a chance to take its course, how does one know what genetics are being passed on sexually? Shouldn't the whole dog be a large part of the breeding plan? I have to wonder if these breeders are letting their puppy buyers know that they don't know if a puppy sold can produce naturally based on the genetics of the parents.

I am not talking AI from a deceased dog or one not readily available but breeders who do this as a matter of choice instead of natural.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Do breeders allow the female to choose the male they want to breed with? Maybe if a female is not cooperative she has an instinctive knowledge it’s not a good idea. Has anyone tried a reluctant female with a different stud to see if the accepts that dog?
 

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Do breeders allow the female to choose the male they want to breed with? Maybe if a female is not cooperative she has an instinctive knowledge it’s not a good idea. Has anyone tried a reluctant female with a different stud to see if the accepts that dog?
The first thought that comes too mind for me is a golden retriever female that had been bred before with zero issues. When they took her to a different stud she was not willing at all and while they did get a successful mating only one puppy survived, has health issues, and there had to be a c-section.

I read an interesting article on humans and how scents may play an unconscious role. I also believe it may be an issue with zoo animals in that they may not want to mate with the one selected for them.

My female when she was in heat was 100% willing to try with our neutered male dog. The stray male dog that showed up while she didn't reject him she was going to make him work for it and do a courtship first. My roommates dog will flag and actively pursue and pester any other dog. She thinks my spayed female would make a great father...
 
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