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Hello all. I’m new to the forum. My name is Rich, I have a 21 month old male GSD named Mattis. About a year ago, he started having issues peeing.

The first time the issue arose he was already completely potty trained. He would whine at the door to show he needed to pee so I’d take him out, and he wouldn’t have a full stream of pee, instead a slow drip. He would also continue to keep trying to pee but just clearly wasn’t getting much out. There’s never any blood in his pee, and he doesn’t whine while peeing. Eventually I grow impatient and bring him back inside. Immediately he starts whining and pacing quickly back and forth in the house (faster than a walk, almost running) and is peeing while pacing in the house.

This continues for a few hours. I take him out, can’t pee fully, I bring him in and he whines and paces and pees. Shortly after I realize the first time that something is wrong, I decide to take him to the vet. They check him out, get a urine sample, and nothing bad comes back. They check the white vs red blood cells and say there’s nothing bad to report. They also say he’s too young for stones. I receive some antibiotics and a nice $400 bill.

This same problem continues to happen once every 6-8 weeks. I took him into the vet again each time. After FOUR VET VISITS, they again do the same exact test, and prescribe antibiotic along with another $400 bill. The fourth time was the last straw for me.

I request Mattis’ medical records to be emailed to me and move him to the VET on base (I’m active military).

A potential issue in my head was that Mattis was born with only one testicle that had descended. I had been notified that if I didn’t get him neutered, the testicle still in his stomach could be prone to cancer. I was also told to wait until he was almost a year old to get him neutered. So at about 10-11 months old, I had the vet on base perform the surgery to neuter him, as well as remove the testicle which was up by his stomach. I hoped this surgery would also relieve him of whatever issue he was having with peeing, but it did not, and the vet on base didn’t know how to solve that problem either.

Here I am, 7 months since he’s been neutered, and he’s had the same urination problem exactly as described above, for the 3rd time since the neuter. It’s an extreme hassle that I cannot find the answer to. 5-6 different vets have not been able to solve the problem with a countless amount of my money, and I hate seeing my dog struggle in pain every 6-8 weeks with the same issue.

What I’ve learned to do is try to let him out to pee as much as I can, otherwise I just bring him in and comfort him, usually blocking him into a single room to constantly pee in so the mess is easier to clean. The issue solves itself within a few hours every single time. I like to just get him to lay down and sleep for a little. He will drip pee while laying down as well.

If anyone has any advice or experience whatsoever with a similar issue it would be remarkably appreciated. Thank you.
 

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Was his prostrate checked? A friend of mine had a similar issue and it was related to the prostrate. Go to a specialist.

Do you have access to a specialist?
 

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So sorry for you and your boy!

Hope you can find a specialist as Jax suggested.

Some insight Per wagwalking.com

Causes of Inability to Urinate in Dogs
There can be numerous causes leading towards an eventual inability to urinate in dogs:

Obstruction in urethra (this can be as a result of blockage caused by crystals in the urine, and can be brought on by something as simple as inadequate water intake)

A dog who has had many urinary tract infections may begin to have trouble urinating due to numerous events of bladder distention

A urinary tract infection may move into the bladder Scar tissue on urethra or bladder

Anatomic abnormalities (congenital or contracted) Spinal cord injury, lesions or disease causing a compression

Trauma or injury to nerves leading to compression

Disk herniation Dysautonomia (a neurological disease also known as Key-Gaskell syndrome)

Some surgeries may bring about an inability to urinate (which is most likely a temporary complication)

Cancer Prostate disease

Diagnosis of Inability to Urinate in Dogs
If the veterinarian has not diagnosed a simple infection or feels that further investigation is needed, a urethral catheter may be inserted to rule out the possibility of a blockage. It is interesting to note that an obstruction of the urethra is more common in male canines, due to the narrowing of the urethra in the penis. Additional testing may include: Abdominal palpation - if kidneys are full, and bladder is empty (anuria) it points to lack of urine production which is an illness within itself CT scan to assess caudal spine for tumor Myelography (radiography exam to look for spinal cord injury) Epidurography (radiography exam to check for spinal cysts) Abdominal ultrasound to check for kidney or bladder concerns Cystoscopy (insertion of a scope to view inside the lower urinary tract)

Treatment of Inability to Urinate in Dogs
Treatment will correlate directly to the exact cause of the inability to urinate. The immediate relief of your dog’s discomfort, as well as the importance of eliminating the problem before the situation worsens, will be of paramount importance.
Treatment may include:
For a urinary tract infection, antibiotics will be administered
Water intake may be increased
Urinary acidifiers or alkalinizers may be given
Your dog will be given medication to relax the bladder and urethra Catheterization of the bladder may be done up to three times per day
Manual bladder expression at regular intervals (several times daily for example in the case of spinal cord injury) could be required, depending on the reason for the inability to urinate
An obstruction may mean surgery if a retropulsion of the obstructing material back into the bladder is not possible
A congenital abnormality could need surgical correction
Non-neutered male dogs may be treated and then neutered if the problem is a prostate issue.


Moms :)
 

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Your dog is lucky to have an owner who is willing to make the trips to the vet and spend the money to try to fix the problem.

Unfortunately, you got some bad advice from at least one of the vets. He definitely needs to be checked for bladder stones. Even puppies can get bladder stones. Small stones can collect in the bladder and cause partial obstruction of the urethra. Bladder stones are easy to diagnose, but it does require an X-ray and/or ultrasound. Some useful info at:

http://www.petmd.com/dog/general-health/bladder-stones-dogs-can-you-prevent-them

http://www.vetwest.com.au/pet-library/bladder-stones-in-dogs

Also, did any vet do a culture and sensitivity on his urine? That is the only way to tell for sure whether a dog has a bladder infection. A urinalysis can be normal and the dog can still have a bladder infection. The culture and sensitivity will also tell you which antibiotics will work to get rid of the bladder infection if the dog has one.

He could also have an enlarged prostate, so a competent vet needs to do a rectal exam to see if his prostate is enlarged.
 

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My dog had the same intermittent issue, but it was his metastasizing oral melanoma (that eventually cut off his ability to pee entirely). In your dog's case, perhaps it is periodic urethral sphincter contractions?
 

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Was his prostrate checked? A friend of mine had a similar issue and it was related to the prostrate. Go to a specialist.

Do you have access to a specialist?

I agree with ^^^...sounds like seeing your regular vet is a revolving door.....I'd try for a referral to a specialist....or if you're based any where near near a Vet teaching college contact them to see if they'll see your dog the amount of knowledge/experience they have is typically impressive.....
 
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You have seen enough vets that it's now time to seek a proper specialist.

There are some concurrent congenital GU abnormalities that accompany cryptorchidism.
Your pup should be evaluated and may need contrast imaging to identify the cause.
In this case your pup must have kidney function evaluated.
Contrast is nephrotoxic so I would only trust a specialist to administer any type of imaging contrast.

The prognosis of this concern for a young pup is often very good.
All the best!
 
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