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Discussion Starter #1
Wonder if anyone els ehas encountered this. My dog's got all the Open skills except I had not gotten around to ever teaching the broad jump. I kind of assumed it would be a breeze. He's got a lot of skills with jumping and even did his first directed jump in a rally trial awhile back and he aced it, I was so proud.

So. I put out the broad jump and stood at the jump and sent him to jump. Well, he thinks it's a foot target. He ran up to me, punched the broad jump boards with his front feet, and looked up at me obviously thrilled with himself. We use foot targets a LOT, it's how I taught him to send to the side for a jump, it's how I taught him to do the directed jumping, it's part of how I'm teaching his go out.

So I sent him over the jump from heel position while moving 2 or 3 times and he jumped it fine.

I've just been treating it like a send to the side rally jump for now just to be sure he gets that when he sees those boards he's actually supposed to jump it, not target with his feet.

Oops. Any other ideas? I've put a bar jump over the broad jump for now to explain what it is to him. But he has such an instinct to go put his feet on things raised about that height in the obedience training setting, I may have really screwed us up.
 

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What if you put a low jump right against the front.After practicing enough until he 'gets' it then lay it across the very front on it's side.The tiny bit of height added wouldn't be a problem.Then remove it altogether.There might be a more clever way but that was my first thought....
 

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I thought that too. Try a low jump, almost more of a step. Also, I noticed if I run with my dogs toward something, they will jump over it on their own rather than run into it or go around.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What if you put a low jump right against the front.After practicing enough until he 'gets' it then lay it across the very front on it's side.The tiny bit of height added wouldn't be a problem.Then remove it altogether.There might be a more clever way but that was my first thought....
What if you put a low jump right against the front.After practicing enough until he 'gets' it then lay it across the very front on it's side.The tiny bit of height added wouldn't be a problem.Then remove it altogether.There might be a more clever way but that was my first thought....
I have the bar jump set up over the broad jump-- put i put the bar at the end of the broad jump because I wasn't sure he would see the boards on the other side of it and plan to land there if you know what I mean? But now that I think of it, I have a crappier old bar jump that has a much skinnier little pvc pipe as the bar of the jump (the one I'm using is m ore like a regulation obedience bar jump with a big bar that's not quite 4x4 but maybe 3x3? It's thick.

Yeah I can try the bar at the front instead.

I also realized that this pattern for jumping he has almost no experience with- AKC broad jump you leave the dog in a stay, go stand by the jump facing the jump, send the dog to jump, and then he fronts again after. He can send to either side for a directed jump with me 30' in front of him, he can send 6' to the side from heel position to a jump, he can recall over a jump straight, he can send straight out over a jump from heel position. But I really should not have tried to teach the new pattern and the new jump simultaneously. I'll teach him this new pattern with a bar jump, teach the broad jump separately, then put them back together and hopefully he'll get it.
 

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Sounds like a plan:)Let us know how it works out!
 

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I have one that'd stomp accross them. We set the boards up on end and spaced them a bit closer together at first. After a couple jumps we returned them to the proper placement and he got the right idea.
 

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The broad jump is 4-5 pieces put together, right? I would take one piece and put a low jump over it, the bar should be just above the broad jump piece. Then start adding pieces and moving the regular jump back as he's successful. The picture in my head is the regular jump ends up in the middle of the broad jump when all pieces are down. Once he's jumping the entire jump successfully, I would take the bar out and leave the posts, changing the picture over time as he's successful.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The broad jump is 4-5 pieces put together, right? I would take one piece and put a low jump over it, the bar should be just above the broad jump piece. Then start adding pieces and moving the regular jump back as he's successful. The picture in my head is the regular jump ends up in the middle of the broad jump when all pieces are down. Once he's jumping the entire jump successfully, I would take the bar out and leave the posts, changing the picture over time as he's successful.
Yes, it's four or five boards that are tilted between probably 3-4 inches off the ground. The pieces of the broad jump slant, lower toward the approach the dog takes. The first time I set it up and did it, I had put the bar jump at the end and I think two of the boards of the broad jump in front of it. I thought that would make sense to him because I've used a "jump bump" is what my agility friend calls it-- basically the equivalent of a ground pole before a horse jump--to teach him to take off better because he was crashing the high jump.

Fortunately or unfortunately, my high jump comes apart easily so if he crashes it it does not hurt him at all and sometimes he wouldn't get his feet up high enough and he'd take down the top panel. THAT I think was at least partly because I started doing retrieves over the jump when his jump mechanics were lacking to begin with. So I think I have an ongoing theme of thinking he can just jump in and do it and a higher level than we have trained to. With the high jump, we added a jump bump to get him to take off better, and I stopped having him retrieve over the jump for awhile and just focused on jumping right with nothing in his mouth and that's working.

So here again I guess I did two things at once-- the pattern and the different style of jump simultaneously.

It would be great if we had a trainer to help us with this stuff instead of me messing it all up trying to teach him b y myself with or without the help of youtube.... :/

So I'll walk this all back and see if I can make it make sense to him. Stay tuned. At my current training rate it might be awhile before i have any meaningful news. But we do have the long cold winter ahead of us to train indoors so I had planned to teach him the broad jump this winter and have him ready for open by next competition season. We'll see. It took me two years to get around to getting him thru novice.

There are show n go's all winter if I can get to them...to get him ready for Open but not spend a fortune competing at anything while I need every dime I have for my old dog right now. If I get to the Dec show n go, I 'll just skip the broad jump because he obviously isn't ready.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have one that'd stomp accross them. We set the boards up on end and spaced them a bit closer together at first. After a couple jumps we returned them to the proper placement and he got the right idea.
Great idea. I'll try that too
 

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When we jump things we use the command over. And I point to guide him where’re and what to jump. Running with them is a good start to this to guide them.


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