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Melonex (Meloxicam) is most often given orally. And it's one of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that can cause ulcers and bleeding:

The only time any of my animals have been given this drug by injection was just after surgery, when they weren't able to take it orally.

Here are some common side effects of meloxicam:

  • Black or bloody stool or diarrhea
  • Blood in vomit
  • Swelling or weight gain from fluid retention
  • Increased thirst or urination
  • Fatigue or weakness
  • Jaundice (yellowing of skin, gums, or eyes)
  • Itchiness
  • Abdominal pain or tenderness
  • Weight loss
  • Stomach ulcers
  • Behavioral changes
Neurocare is a B vitamin. It's most often used to treat anemia. Is your dog anemic? (I sincerely doubt it!) There is NO good reason either of these drugs needs to be given by injection. I think your vet is just doing this for show, to make you think he's Doing Something Important, and can charge you for an office visit.

Given the side effects of Meloxicam, I definitely think the oral route is much safer, and easier to adjust the dose if the dog is showing serious side effects from it.


I'll say it again: find yourself a new vet!!
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Thank you silver
Melonex (Meloxicam) is most often given orally. And it's one of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that can cause ulcers and bleeding:

The only time any of my animals have been given this drug by injection was just after surgery, when they weren't able to take it orally.

Here are some common side effects of meloxicam:

  • Black or bloody stool or diarrhea
  • Blood in vomit
  • Swelling or weight gain from fluid retention
  • Increased thirst or urination
  • Fatigue or weakness
  • Jaundice (yellowing of skin, gums, or eyes)
  • Itchiness
  • Abdominal pain or tenderness
  • Weight loss
  • Stomach ulcers
  • Behavioral changes
Neurocare is a B vitamin. It's most often used to treat anemia. Is your dog anemic? (I sincerely doubt it!) There is NO good reason either of these drugs needs to be given by injection. I think your vet is just doing this for show, to make you think he's Doing Something Important, and can charge you for an office visit.

Given the side effects of Meloxicam, I definitely think the oral route is much safer, and easier to adjust the dose if the dog is showing serious side effects from it.


I'll say it again: find yourself a new vet!!
Thank you silver. I forgot to mention, the vet observed that the blood is thin. I don't know what did he mean. Yes I will change the vet by this weekend. What do you think about sherlie walking with ease now and then!
 

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Well, I am glad to know she is improving. But I really don't know what's wrong. Definitely your dog needs to have some x-rays taken to see what the problem is. It could be HOD, or could be something wrong with the spine. There's a condition called transitional vertebrae that can affect German shepherds. There are lots of possibilities.

When a doctor says the blood is thin, that's an old-fashioned way of saying you're anemic. So that would explain the neurocare injections.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Thank you silver, I will take her to the super speciality. It would take me a complete day and now I couldn't get leave as the audit is going on. So I would take her on Saturday and will let you know what's the problem.
 

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Given vet care standards are very different in India compared to the US I'm just going to throw my thoughts in the ring.
Raviparanam your vet may have given your pup injections rather than oral meds because your pup has had Parvo recently. I don't know how long ago that was? But I do know it can take many months for the GI system and Immune system to fully recover. Even though your pup seemed fully recovered from the parvo doesn't mean her digestive and immune system are functioning optimally. Yes meloxicam (melonex) is well know to have GI side effects. To lessen the possibility of those side effects injections that don't have to be digested in the stomach are probably the better option. So IMO that doesn't make your vet someone just looking to rip you off. Actually seems prudent given your pups poor health history in at just 5 months of age that likely still has a fragile stomach from the parvo.
Also, it is possible your dog is a touch anemic as a hold over from the parvo infection. Again it takes a good long time for the body to reach full health after parvo.
In the US most good vets would have probably held off a while longer to give vaccines (which tax the immune system) do to the parvo infection. However in your part of the world canine distemper is just as much a threat as parvo so I can see why he may have given as the risk was too great not too.
Given your pups health history causing a great amount of stress on the a very immature immune system topped off by recent vaccines your theory of HOD seems plausible given the info Moms provided in the links.
I do hope you find out exactly what is going on and your pup continues to improve.
Keep us posted.
 

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Springbrz, I was thinking the meloxicam would have the same side effects with an injection as orally. But yeah, I think you're right.

The dog was first diagnosed with parvo 20 days ago. I don't know how long full recovery takes, but the bowel still could be irritable and inflamed.

I do know of many other instances where vets from India have diagnosed a dog with a nutritional deficiency (especially rickets/vitamin D deficiency) and given vitamin and mineral supplements when the problem was obviously something else.That's why I was immediately suspicious of the vitamin injection. But it turns out in this case that it's something the dog really needs.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Given vet care standards are very different in India compared to the US I'm just going to throw my thoughts in the ring.
Raviparanam your vet may have given your pup injections rather than oral meds because your pup has had Parvo recently. I don't know how long ago that was? But I do know it can take many months for the GI system and Immune system to fully recover. Even though your pup seemed fully recovered from the parvo doesn't mean her digestive and immune system are functioning optimally. Yes meloxicam (melonex) is well know to have GI side effects. To lessen the possibility of those side effects injections that don't have to be digested in the stomach are probably the better option. So IMO that doesn't make your vet someone just looking to rip you off. Actually seems prudent given your pups poor health history in at just 5 months of age that likely still has a fragile stomach from the parvo.
Also, it is possible your dog is a touch anemic as a hold over from the parvo infection. Again it takes a good long time for the body to reach full health after parvo.
In the US most good vets would have probably held off a while longer to give vaccines (which tax the immune system) do to the parvo infection. However in your part of the world canine distemper is just as much a threat as parvo so I can see why he may have given as the risk was too great not too.
Given your pups health history causing a great amount of stress on the a very immature immune system topped off by recent vaccines your theory of HOD seems plausible given the info Moms provided in the links.
I do hope you find out exactly what is going on and your pup continues to improve.
Keep us posted.
Springbrz,
Thank you. She had parvo some 25 days back which was 5 days after she had DHPP vaccine and she has been due for the next vaccine since 1st of this month, which we have postponed, considering her health condition. With the onset of parvo she has almost lost 3-5 kgs of weight and is now weighing at 10.2 kg which is, I consider, not upto the mark for a 5-month old pup. Tomorrow she is going to have a blood test which I think at least throws some light over the health issue of Sherlie. Will surely keep you all posted what's going on.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Springbrz, I was thinking the meloxicam would have the same side effects with an injection as orally. But yeah, I think you're right.

The dog was first diagnosed with parvo 20 days ago. I don't know how long full recovery takes, but the bowel still could be irritable and inflamed.

I do know of many other instances where vets from India have diagnosed a dog with a nutritional deficiency (especially rickets/vitamin D deficiency) and given vitamin and mineral supplements when the problem was obviously something else.That's why I was immediately suspicious of the vitamin injection. But it turns out in this case that it's something the dog really needs.
Hi Silver,
She is ok today. I have noticed today small bumps on her knuckles and she is urinating a lot, which probably is a side effect of the injections she is receiving. What is reason of the bumps on her knuckles? They are as our knuckles when we type on the keyboard.
 

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@Raviparanam I think a full blood panel will be helpful and I would ask for x-rays of her legs and spine. It is possible she has developed panosteitis (pano for short). Pano would show up on x-rays. Pano would be a likely diagnosis and has a good prognosis. It would explain the fever, lameness and swelling you are seeing in the legs. It also is likely why you are seeing improvement with the meloxicam shots. Management of diet, pain and exercise would be key if it is pano.

Having only been 20-25 days since she had parvo her immune system and digestive tract has not fully recovered. Poor pup has had a rough start. Good that you are keeping on top of things.

What are you feeding your pup? Diet and nutrition is important in parvo recovery and is also a factor in pano.

Panosteitis in Dogs
 

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Ravi, the bumps are the growth plates of her bones. It is totally normal at this time in her life. And yes, she definitely needs to gain some weight!

Make sure she is getting a good quality puppy food!
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Hi Spring and silver,
I fed her with royal canine puppy max for german shepherds twice a day and either curd rice, beef rice or chicken rice (just boiled) once a day till she had parvo. Since parvo I have been feeding her with the boiled chicken with curd rice and now and then royal canine. Coming to snacks I have been giving her the milky chew sticks and chicken sticks. No table food whatsoever. Complete bland diet. No biscuits nor chocolates since getting her. A small run a day and catch me game for ten minutes a day is all she got till parvo. From then no physical activity. Any suggestions on diet and activity are welcome.
 

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Royal Canin is a pretty good food. I wouldn't change it. Does she seem to be gaining weight since she recovered from the parvo?

There's not a lot of nutrition in rice. I would put her back on the Royal canin as her main source of food. Did the vet say to keep feeding her mainly rice?

Puppy pics- so cute! Was she the only pup in the litter?
 

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@Raviparanam I had to look up curd rice. Basically rice with yogurt...yes? If she is handling the kibble without issue I would decrease the rice gradually and keep some yogurt for the probiotics which are good for her healing tummy.
I'm not sure what you mean by "Chocolates" Dogs should never ever have Chocolate. Chocolate is toxic to dogs. Maybe this is your term for treats? During parvo a bland diet was a must. Nothing wrong with a bland diet short term and she may still need it but long term a bland diet lacks in vital nutrients that she will need to grow and be healthy. If she can tolerate it I would start transitioning to a normal balanced diet of the Royal Canin.
 

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Royal Canin is a pretty good food. I wouldn't change it. Does she seem to be gaining weight since she recovered from the parvo?

There's not a lot of nutrition in rice. I would put her back on the Royal canin as her main source of food. Did the vet say to keep feeding her mainly rice?

Puppy pics- so cute! Was she the only pup in the litter?
Yes that's the reason I had fed her with royal canin. Yes she does seem, a couple of days after recovering from parvo, to be gaining weight. But once she had that hind legs problem again she lost her weight. Yes the vet suggested to continue with rice for some more days. He suggested that curd is good for her digestive system as hers is not yet fully recovered, but I have gone a step further after researching over internet and started giving her chicken and royal canin. Thank you, she is one of the four in the litter.
 

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@Raviparanam I had to look up curd rice. Basically rice with yogurt...yes? If she is handling the kibble without issue I would decrease the rice gradually and keep some yogurt for the probiotics which are good for her healing tummy.
I'm not sure what you mean by "Chocolates" Dogs should never ever have Chocolate. Chocolate is toxic to dogs. Maybe this is your term for treats? During parvo a bland diet was a must. Nothing wrong with a bland diet short term and she may still need it but long term a bland diet lacks in vital nutrients that she will need to grow and be healthy. If she can tolerate it I would start transitioning to a normal balanced diet of the Royal Canin.
Yes spring. The curd is some what similar to yoghurt. The vet suggested it for her healing digestive system. I mean I am not feeding her with chocolates. Yes chocolates are pretty nasty for them. Yes I would start raising her royal canin quantity slowly.
 
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