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Sherlie is 5 month old. She was diagnosed with parvo 20 days back. And she has recovered from it. She was normal, but now and then displayed slight, I mean very slight, which is unobservable to the normal eye, difficulty in getting up. But once she was up, she was quite normal. 5 days back we took her to a vet who ingested 500 ml of plasma ( she was 10kgs) and prescribed diarest in the morning and evening. The very next day after she took plasma, she was unable to move or raise. Even if we made her stand, she arched her back and would drag her hind legs with much difficulty. What would be the problem? Though I insisted on doctor to diagnose, he would not commit himself and suggested that we would continue the treatment for some more days. He prescribed joint plus, diarest and other vitamin supplements all to be given couple of times a day and a couple of injections every alternate day, what the injection is I couldn't catch. Her appetite is normal. Stool is normal today, though the stool was a bit black till yesterday. It's been almost a week that we slept soundly. Any suggestion or help is highly appreciated.
 

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The plasma would have been given because your dog was dehydrated due to the diarrhea. I really don't see how her inability to stand is due to the parvo virus, or her treatment, unless she is extremely weak. It is more likely due to an issue with her spine.

Try pinching the skin between her toes on her hind leg. Does she react by drawing the foot away? Is she able to move the hind legs even though she can't stand?

If so, she needs immediate help - she is too weak to stand up, and should go back to the vet for treatment.
If she does not move her legs, feet or tail, there is a problem with her spine, and again, you should seek immediate veterinary treatment for her!

I would also be looking for another veterinarian.

Best of luck: this does NOT sound good!
 

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Ozzy, the OP is from India (Indian flag below his/her name) and may not have a veterinary E.R. available. :(
But yeah, I agree - the dog needs to see whatever veterinarian is available as soon as possible!
 

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Thank you sunsilver and ozzy for your response. Sunsilver I have done what you have advised. Yes she has drawn her foot away and I tried again, she tried to bite. Regarding tail movement, yes she is able to wag it, when she sees me or any of the family. I haven't stopped seeing the vet. I have been taking her every alternate day to the vet. The only problem is that the vet is not committing himself to anything. Nor he is suggesting any xray. He is giving a couple of injections one is related to nerve, though I couldn't catch the complete name. I do really need a perfect diagnosis, so we could treat her accordingly. As far as my research goes, I feel the symptoms are much similar to HOD. She has discharge through eyes lately. And she has fever now and then. Yes sunsilver I am from India. You are right there's no emergency service available here. But I am seeing the vet regularly. I would see a week and if still the vet is non-committing, then I would go to another vet.
 

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What is HOD?
Your dog has a fever - is it on antibiotics? What does the vet think is causing the fever? Is she eating and drinking okay?

I am concerned that your dog might die if you do not get a correct diagnosis. I would change vets NOW! Any animal that can't walk is very ill.

What vaccinations has your dog had? Canine distemper can cause fever and neurological symptoms.
 

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What is HOD?
Your dog has a fever - is it on antibiotics? What does the vet think is causing the fever?

I am concerned that your dog might die if you do not get a correct diagnosis. I would change vets NOW!

What vaccinations has your dog had? Canine distemper can cause fever and neurological symptoms.
You horrify me. Yes the most recent it had is distemper vaccine. HOD is hypertrophic Osteodystrophy which is related to growth phase. A dog with high growth rate is susceptible to this. Yes it had antibiotics until a week back. What do you think would cause death in this case? Its appetite is perfectly ok. It has no diarrhea or vomiting right now.
 

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Ravi, I'm a retired nurse, not a vet, and can't see your dog to know just how sick she is. I do know parvovirus severely damages the lining of the bowels, and am wondering if she really is fully recovered from that. Is her appetite okay? If an animal is having serious pain in the stomach or bowels, they will often hunch their back to try to relieve it.

I just read up about HOD. It's something I've never heard of before, and it sounds pretty serious. I agree with your vet -it IS a possibility, but he/she SHOULD be taking x-rays to confirm the diagnosis. Also the drugs given to treat it (corticosteroids) can damage the lining of the stomach, so that is probably why the vet is giving diarest.

Edit: Just reread your first post - you said her appetite is okay, so that makes me feel better about her chances. But any time an animal is too sick or in too much pain to walk, you have a serious situation.

.
 

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Hi Ravi, I suggest you phone the vet's receptionist and request they email you her records. Just so you understand and can share what's happening.
 

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Ravi, I'm a retired nurse, not a vet, and can't see your dog to know just how sick she is. I do know parvovirus severely damages the lining of the bowels, and am wondering if she really is fully recovered from that. Is her appetite okay? If an animal is having serious pain in the stomach or bowels, they will often hunch their back to try to relieve it.

I just read up about HOD. It's something I've never heard of before, and it sounds pretty serious. I agree with your vet -it IS a possibility, but he/she SHOULD be taking x-rays to confirm the diagnosis. Also the drugs given to treat it (corticosteroids) can damage the lining of the stomach, so that is probably why the vet is giving diarest.

Edit: Just reread your first post - you said her appetite is okay, so that makes me feel better about her chances. But any time an animal is too sick or in too much pain to walk, you have a serious situation.

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Thank you so much silver. I really apologize if I have offended you. I just mean that I am terrified after seeing DEATH. Yes the HOD is not a famous thing. My vet has not confirmed nor has suggested HOD. I wonder whether he is aware of HOD. I have gone through some of the posts in the forum, where I have read a story of HOD and Sherlie's symptoms quite resemble those of HOD. However that's just my point of view. Yes the Vet should have taken Xrays. It seems the moron is just passing the time giving her the injections. But I feel HOD is far better than DM or Hip Displasya. Because the pet may recover from HOD after it reaches the maturity phase. Silver do the dog moan when she has pain? Because Sherlie stopped moaning after she seemed recovered from Parvo.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hi Ravi, I suggest you phone the vet's receptionist and request they email you her records. Just so you understand and can share what's happening.
Hi Dunkirk, I don't think the vet is maintaining any record of Sherlie. Not to mention, here in India the vet care is meagre, let alone upto the mark.
 

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Ravi, no, I am not offended at all. And I know that veterinary care in your part of the world isn't that good. I've seen numerous posts where the vets in your part of the world were giving the dog injections of vitamins and joint supplements, etc. when the problem the dog had was due to poor genetic conformation that could not be fixed (e.g. cow hocks.)

That's why your situation has me worried about your dog.

Okay, this is what I would do if it were my dog. I would find out exactly what is in those injections the vet is giving. Some drugs given to relieve pain and inflammation, like steroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can damage the stomach and bowels. Given that your dog just recovered from parvo, her digestive system probably isn't in very good shape. Keep a close eye on her poop for any signs of blood. Black in the poop comes from bleeding high up in the digestive system, actual red blood comes from the large intestine. If you see this, stop the drug, or get the vet to reduce the dose. This is a SERIOUS side effect, and is quite common with these drugs. It can even kill the dog if the dose isn't reduced.

If you aren't sure of the spelling, ask the vet to write it down. If you post it here, we can tell you what the drug is for, and what side effects to watch out for.

I would also change vets. Your dog is running a fever, can't walk, and needs to have a full health assessment including blood tests and x-rays. You NEED to get to the bottom of this, so she can be properly treated!

German shepherds are very stoic. They often do not show if they are in pain. But if she is suffering from HOD, she is in a lot of pain. That's why she doesn't want to walk. Her joints are inflamed and very sore.
 

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Silver, the poop of Sherlie yesterday was fine but till yesterday it had a bit black poop. Yes the doctor pronounces something and the nurse injects it. So I couldn't catch the word, as I am not familiar with it. Tomorrow I will take her to the vet and will take a note of the name of the chemical. If you would care to see I will upload a video of Sherlie trying to stand. Just take a look at it.
 

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So sorry to hear your dog is having problems.

A classmate of mine had a GSD with HOD several years ago. Below is some info I pulled from my notes on the subject.

Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy

Vaccine reactions - multivalent/combination vaccines are an enormous problem with young dogs with immature immune systems, especially if the dogs have not received adequate amounts of a antioxidants to help the body to detoxify from being bombarded with combination shots. It is even more of a problem when Lymes Vaccine or Rabies Vaccine has been at the same time as the combination shots. Growth problems in Great Danes - HOD, Retained Ulna Core, Bowing Legs | GREATDANELADY.COM

Dr. Dodds: Certain breeds or families of dogs appear to be more susceptible to adverse vaccine reactions, particularly post-vaccinal seizures, high fevers, and painful episodes of hypertrophic osteodystrophy (HOD). Therefore, we have the responsibility to advise companion animal breeders and caregivers of the potential for genetically susceptible littermates and relatives to be at increased risk for similar adverse vaccine reactions. In popular (or rare) inbred and linebred animals, the breed in general can be at increased risk as illustrated in the examples below. Treating Adverse Vaccine Reactions by Jean Dodds, DVM - Truth4Dogs

Orthopedic Disease (Vaccine-induced Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy; HOD)

The underlying pathologic changes that bring about Hypertophic Osteodystrophy (HOD; often called metaphyseal osteopathy in the research literature-- refer to "Growing Pains: Growth-Associated Bone Disorders in the Dog") are identical for both vaccine (or pathogen)-associated HOD and developmental/dietary-associated HOD. This was established by A.P. Mee and colleagues in a series of peer-reviewed publications. In fact, Mee's group, physicians using canine models to explore cellular mechanisms responsible for Paget's disease in humans, characterized the cellular mechanisms responsible for HOD. Mee's group provided considerable evidence that the defect in osteoclasts (increased number and size), which occur as the primary step in HOD development, occur as a result of increased levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6; a multi-functional cytokine produced by immune cells--macrophages, T-cells, B-cells--and endothelial cells).

In their reports, Mee et al. described a mechanism by which IL-6 is up-regulated as a result of production of reactive oxygen species that activate Nuclear Factor kappa-beta (NF-kb) which in turn, induces IL-6. Pathogens like bacteria and viruses, but also certain nutrient-overloads (iron-overload for instance) induce these reactive oxygen species. Therefore, exogenous factors that may activate the cellular pathway of IL-6 induction lead to osteoclast defects that are the underlying pathologic cause of HOD.

As described above under Neurologic Disease, modified-live canine distemper vaccine has been linked to Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis in dogs. It is conceivable that similar to inducing inflammatory responses in neurologic cells, the modified-live distemper component of multivalent vaccines may similarly induce inflammatory responses in osteoclasts. In fact, a recent study by Harrus et al. suggests that as with acute encephalomyelitis, the use of multivalent vaccines increases risk for HOD development since dogs vaccinated with only trivalent, modified-live canine distemper have a lower risk for HOD. Therefore, the CDV vaccine (when administered as a multivalent vaccine) could induce the same IL-6 pathway thus leading to HOD in the same manner as virally-induced HOD or dietary-induced HOD.

So if HOD is the same disease for pathogen-induced, vaccine-induced, or dietary induced HOD, why do dogs with dietary-induced HOD typically have a better anticipated outcome than those with vaccine-induced HOD? This probably is explained by duration of the exogenous-causative factor. Dietary agents typically have rapid pharmacokinetics (metabolic inactivation and clearance from the body). Once the dietary imbalance is corrected or the offending nutrient is discontinued, induction of IL-6 will discontinue because the nutrient will be cleared from the body and the number of reactive oxygen species will decrease. In contrast, the modified-live viruses in CDV vaccines, though non-pathogenic, have the ability to continue to reproduce themselves (to augment the immune response) and will be around until the immune system can produce sufficient antibody titer to eradicate the viral component--this might take a considerable amount of time particularly when considering that HOD presents in puppies prior to 6 months of age who have immature immune systems or in puppies that are immunocompromised for other reasons. Interestingly, if one observes age of HOD incidence one may find a correlation between loss of circulating maternal antibodies--which immediately neutralize vaccine components but gradually decrease in the puppy's circulation beginning about 6-8 weeks of age--and onset of HOD. That is, maternal antibodies may protect puppies or reduce severity of vaccine-induced HOD for the first few months, but as maternal antibody titer decreases, incidence and severity of vaccine-induced HOD will increase. This may explain the observation that symptoms of HOD are most severe between 3-6 months. Therefore, in breeds or lines predisposed to HOD, immunization with only killed-, monovalent-, or subunit vaccines is recommended. Wing-N-Wave Labradors Vaccines, Infectious Diseases and the Canine Immune System

Growing Pains (scroll down for HOD info)

more about HOD is available from S. Gary Brown, DVM, DACVS and Roy R. Pool, DVM, PhD. - See more at: http://www.akcchf.org/canine-health/your-dogs-health/disease-information/hypertrophic-osteodystrophy.html#sthash.mAIXQUz3.dpuf


Recent studies have shown a link between recent vaccination with a modified live virus and the onset of HOD, particularly in Weimaraner dogs[7][8]. Hypertrophic osteodystrophy - Dog
 

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So sorry to hear your dog is having problems.

A classmate of mine had a GSD with HOD several years ago. Below is some info I pulled from my notes on the subject.

Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy

Vaccine reactions - multivalent/combination vaccines are an enormous problem with young dogs with immature immune systems, especially if the dogs have not received adequate amounts of a antioxidants to help the body to detoxify from being bombarded with combination shots. It is even more of a problem when Lymes Vaccine or Rabies Vaccine has been at the same time as the combination shots. Growth problems in Great Danes - HOD, Retained Ulna Core, Bowing Legs | GREATDANELADY.COM

Dr. Dodds: Certain breeds or families of dogs appear to be more susceptible to adverse vaccine reactions, particularly post-vaccinal seizures, high fevers, and painful episodes of hypertrophic osteodystrophy (HOD). Therefore, we have the responsibility to advise companion animal breeders and caregivers of the potential for genetically susceptible littermates and relatives to be at increased risk for similar adverse vaccine reactions. In popular (or rare) inbred and linebred animals, the breed in general can be at increased risk as illustrated in the examples below. Treating Adverse Vaccine Reactions by Jean Dodds, DVM - Truth4Dogs

Orthopedic Disease (Vaccine-induced Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy; HOD)

The underlying pathologic changes that bring about Hypertophic Osteodystrophy (HOD; often called metaphyseal osteopathy in the research literature-- refer to "Growing Pains: Growth-Associated Bone Disorders in the Dog") are identical for both vaccine (or pathogen)-associated HOD and developmental/dietary-associated HOD. This was established by A.P. Mee and colleagues in a series of peer-reviewed publications. In fact, Mee's group, physicians using canine models to explore cellular mechanisms responsible for Paget's disease in humans, characterized the cellular mechanisms responsible for HOD. Mee's group provided considerable evidence that the defect in osteoclasts (increased number and size), which occur as the primary step in HOD development, occur as a result of increased levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6; a multi-functional cytokine produced by immune cells--macrophages, T-cells, B-cells--and endothelial cells).

In their reports, Mee et al. described a mechanism by which IL-6 is up-regulated as a result of production of reactive oxygen species that activate Nuclear Factor kappa-beta (NF-kb) which in turn, induces IL-6. Pathogens like bacteria and viruses, but also certain nutrient-overloads (iron-overload for instance) induce these reactive oxygen species. Therefore, exogenous factors that may activate the cellular pathway of IL-6 induction lead to osteoclast defects that are the underlying pathologic cause of HOD.

As described above under Neurologic Disease, modified-live canine distemper vaccine has been linked to Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis in dogs. It is conceivable that similar to inducing inflammatory responses in neurologic cells, the modified-live distemper component of multivalent vaccines may similarly induce inflammatory responses in osteoclasts. In fact, a recent study by Harrus et al. suggests that as with acute encephalomyelitis, the use of multivalent vaccines increases risk for HOD development since dogs vaccinated with only trivalent, modified-live canine distemper have a lower risk for HOD. Therefore, the CDV vaccine (when administered as a multivalent vaccine) could induce the same IL-6 pathway thus leading to HOD in the same manner as virally-induced HOD or dietary-induced HOD.

So if HOD is the same disease for pathogen-induced, vaccine-induced, or dietary induced HOD, why do dogs with dietary-induced HOD typically have a better anticipated outcome than those with vaccine-induced HOD? This probably is explained by duration of the exogenous-causative factor. Dietary agents typically have rapid pharmacokinetics (metabolic inactivation and clearance from the body). Once the dietary imbalance is corrected or the offending nutrient is discontinued, induction of IL-6 will discontinue because the nutrient will be cleared from the body and the number of reactive oxygen species will decrease. In contrast, the modified-live viruses in CDV vaccines, though non-pathogenic, have the ability to continue to reproduce themselves (to augment the immune response) and will be around until the immune system can produce sufficient antibody titer to eradicate the viral component--this might take a considerable amount of time particularly when considering that HOD presents in puppies prior to 6 months of age who have immature immune systems or in puppies that are immunocompromised for other reasons. Interestingly, if one observes age of HOD incidence one may find a correlation between loss of circulating maternal antibodies--which immediately neutralize vaccine components but gradually decrease in the puppy's circulation beginning about 6-8 weeks of age--and onset of HOD. That is, maternal antibodies may protect puppies or reduce severity of vaccine-induced HOD for the first few months, but as maternal antibody titer decreases, incidence and severity of vaccine-induced HOD will increase. This may explain the observation that symptoms of HOD are most severe between 3-6 months. Therefore, in breeds or lines predisposed to HOD, immunization with only killed-, monovalent-, or subunit vaccines is recommended. Wing-N-Wave Labradors Vaccines, Infectious Diseases and the Canine Immune System

Growing Pains (scroll down for HOD info)

more about HOD is available from S. Gary Brown, DVM, DACVS and Roy R. Pool, DVM, PhD. - See more at: http://www.akcchf.org/canine-health/your-dogs-health/disease-information/hypertrophic-osteodystrophy.html#sthash.mAIXQUz3.dpuf


Recent studies have shown a link between recent vaccination with a modified live virus and the onset of HOD, particularly in Weimaraner dogs[7][8]. Hypertrophic osteodystrophy - Dog
Thank you so much for the information. How was the dog with HOD. Had the dog overcome the HOD? I have seen a couple of cases where a puppy has recovered completely at an age of 1.5 years, whereas in other case the puppy was euthanized.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yes, a video would be helpful!
Silver, thank you, but I couldn't upload a video to the discussion. However silver, the poop today is quite good. And sherlie yesterday has exhibited a bit of activity, I mean she tried to ran, though she just had a couple of paces, that too with a hunch back that was a bit normal when compared to the previous hunch she had. Today as well when she was pooping, she walked a bit. I hope she could recover, and I am taking her to the vet today in the evening.
 

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Thank you so much for the information. How was the dog with HOD. Had the dog overcome the HOD? I have seen a couple of cases where a puppy has recovered completely at an age of 1.5 years, whereas in other case the puppy was euthanized.
I remember that her particular dog was very sick with fever, but sorry to say that she came back to watch a few classes and then we never saw her again, so I don't know what happened.
 

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Hi silver, ozy, dunkirk and momto2gsds. Sherlie is acting fine. Her poop is normal today. And she was a bit active and had dragged me at the vet. She walked a fair distance. And looked like she was in a good mood. She imitated and howled at the siren of a police vehicle!! Vet prescribed a blood test day after tomorrow. Vet is quite positive today. Will post updates. Thank you so much for the support.
 

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Ravi, no, I am not offended at all. And I know that veterinary care in your part of the world isn't that good. I've seen numerous posts where the vets in your part of the world were giving the dog injections of vitamins and joint supplements, etc. when the problem the dog had was due to poor genetic conformation that could not be fixed (e.g. cow hocks.)

That's why your situation has me worried about your dog.

Okay, this is what I would do if it were my dog. I would find out exactly what is in those injections the vet is giving. Some drugs given to relieve pain and inflammation, like steroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can damage the stomach and bowels. Given that your dog just recovered from parvo, her digestive system probably isn't in very good shape. Keep a close eye on her poop for any signs of blood. Black in the poop comes from bleeding high up in the digestive system, actual red blood comes from the large intestine. If you see this, stop the drug, or get the vet to reduce the dose. This is a SERIOUS side effect, and is quite common with these drugs. It can even kill the dog if the dose isn't reduced.

If you aren't sure of the spelling, ask the vet to write it down. If you post it here, we can tell you what the drug is for, and what side effects to watch out for.

I would also change vets. Your dog is running a fever, can't walk, and needs to have a full health assessment including blood tests and x-rays. You NEED to get to the bottom of this, so she can be properly treated!

German shepherds are very stoic. They often do not show if they are in pain. But if she is suffering from HOD, she is in a lot of pain. That's why she doesn't want to walk. Her joints are inflamed and very sore.
Silver, forgot to mention, the vet is injecting neurocare and melonex. I have searched for the neurocare for dogs, but couldn't find the chemical component.
 
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