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Okay so we have a major dilemma in my house. I have one GSD who is 11 years old. We have finally decided that it was time to bring another dog into the house and when we went to the breeders she has two girl pups left. We found out that one of the girls has a heart murmur and might need surgery. She was going to send the heart murmur dog to the shelter and being the dog lover that I am we ended up with both. Ive done some reading about having littermates now I'm terrified. I can financially support all of the heart puppies needs and I want some tips about having two pups at once. PLEASE HELP!!!!!
 

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I wish you good luck, female/female aggression can be terrible, I have witnessed it several times now. Some people have no issues with multiple females but some have horrible fights. I personally would rehome one of them. I would never trust them to be alone together. Once they fight they tend to not forget and always want to fight.
 

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Aww that's so sweet you took the sick puppy. Not only will you have your hands full with two but one being sick :( poor little thing.
I have to pups - girl is 14 months, the boy is 9 months. Each came home at 7 weeks from different breeders.
It was definitely overwhelming in the beginning . Two is much more than twice the work
But is So So very rewarding! :).
They will learn your schedule for everything, when they go out to potty try putting only one on leash that way you'll be sure they both do their business on each trip outside, and not just running around playing.
Mine do everything together it is so sweet, I love watching them play.
I do train them apart sometimes.
At least the weather is nice, my boy came home in December and it was freezing out
Enjoy your Puppies and try to ave fun!



Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

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I'd rehome one while she's still young. I'm sure your breeder isn't an option. Try to get in contact with a German Shepherd rescue.

How bad is the murmur? Some puppies just grow out of them.
 

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Well, this "breeder" certainly is a piece of work. I do hope the flat out gave you the puppy they were planning on dumping. I'd definitely consider turning one of the ups over to a rescue. One pup is a handful to raise. Two pups...
 

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Thank you for all your replies. I don't think I want to rehome one. We already fell in love and I couldn't bear giving one up at this point the murmur isn't terrible it could close on its own (hopefully it will). She also did give us the pup. I don't know about the fighting or not because the one girl is SO submissive and they are both very even tempered. I have my significant other to help me train. After we train though where do we go from there? Should they still be separated? And if so how much?
 

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I previously contacted some other rescues around but the surgery if needed is expensive and they probably wouldn't give it to her. She has the PDA murmur so if it doesn't close on its own and goes untreated she will eventually die.
 

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The issues between females (if you are going to have them) likely won't show until they are both mature at around 1.5 -2 years old. It could be sooner or later or never. At 8 weeks (hopefully they were 8 weeks when you got them), their personalities aren't completely formed.

If you are set on keeping both then you need to read what you can about raising two puppies (esp female litter mates) at once. They need to be able to develop their own personalities and learn to experience the world on their own and not rely on each other.

Best of luck.
 

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Thank you for all your replies. I don't think I want to rehome one. We already fell in love and I couldn't bear giving one up at this point the murmur isn't terrible it could close on its own (hopefully it will). She also did give us the pup. I don't know about the fighting or not because the one girl is SO submissive and they are both very even tempered. I have my significant other to help me train. After we train though where do we go from there? Should they still be separated? And if so how much?
I have two female liter mates. They will be 3 on the 15th and so far we've had no trouble with fighting. They get along very well, but from what I've read, they might be the exception to the rule. We trained ours separately in the beginning, but later, we did take some classes together. After you "train through" keep looking at other classes that may interest you and that your pup may do well with and keep going! I think that may be why ours do so well together is we keep them fairly busy, mostly games/playing, but training to, it really never ends.
 

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What a horrible breeder. I hope both of your pups are healthy otherwise. She sounds like a red flag to me for dumping a sickly puppy and making it someone else's problem.
Adopting two litter sisters is the riskiest combination; besides the enormous task (if you want to do it right) of raising two pups you have a good chance of ending up having to give up one, once they reach adolescence. Once they start fighting, you cannot keep them together.
Hope it works out for you.
I would take them to different classes so they are not together in one class. I have had clients with litter mates in one class and they couldn't even think straight (the dogs). They only were focused on each other.
Also I would let them sleep in separate crates, at separate sites in the house once fully crate trained so they become less dependent on each other and also limit their play time together so they will focus on you more.
And socialization often separated to increase their confidence of standing on their own.
 

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Good for you! My boy "had" a heart murmur when he was born and he is now as good as new. It got progressively better as he grew and now at 8 months he is clear of it. Can't help you with the females. I know of someone that has a mother and two daughters but they are from different litters. They all get along fine though in a pack. I would guess they will sort it out.
 

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What a horrible breeder. I hope both of your pups are healthy otherwise. She sounds like a red flag to me for dumping a sickly puppy and making it someone else's problem.
Adopting two litter sisters is the riskiest combination; besides the enormous task (if you want to do it right) of raising two pups you have a good chance of ending up having to give up one, once they reach adolescence. Once they start fighting, you cannot keep them together.
Hope it works out for you.
I would take them to different classes so they are not together in one class. I have had clients with litter mates in one class and they couldn't even think straight (the dogs). They only were focused on each other.
Also I would let them sleep in separate crates, at separate sites in the house once fully crate trained so they become less dependent on each other and also limit their play time together so they will focus on you more.
And socialization often separated to increase their confidence of standing on their own.
I 100% agree with this comment
 

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Isn't there a saying along the lines of "Dogs fight for breeding rights. Bitches fight for breathing right."?
 

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good luck. having one pup is hard enough for most people. keep
your nose to the grind. it can be done and you probably can do it,
right, you can do it, you can do it.
 

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Isn't there a saying along the lines of "Dogs fight for breeding rights. Bitches fight for breathing right."?
Another one: "Males fight for status and females fight to drive the weakest out."
It's all about the breeding rights. They don't know about spaying, loving each other or sharing. We often forget that they are dogs; animals with animal instincts.
 

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Isn't there a saying along the lines of "Dogs fight for breeding rights. Bitches fight for breathing right."?
This.
My uncle had two sisters from 8 weeks when I was younger. They LOVED each other, inseparable. One day when they were about 5-6, they just decided to tear into each other. He tried to reintroduce them a few times, but it was never successful so he kept them separated. He went out of town when they were 9, and left them with a petsitter and specific instructions NOT to allow them to interact AT ALL. Well. The woman didn't listen, let them loose together. They fought until one was dead and the other died soon after from the extremity of her wounds.
On the other hand, he had another pair of siblings who never had any issues and died peacefully in their sleeps at a ripe old age. It all just depends.
Personally, I am very concerned about bitch-fighting. I had intended on a male, and ended up with Shoba. Now she is 6 months and I have to watch the girls (with calm energy), because Koda is beginning to be testy with her. Shoba was spayed a few weeks ago (I'm against early spay but she had a hernia that was getting worse so we got it over with), and would simply be a much easier girl to rehome if they ever got into a fight and it became necessary. Does that mean I love her less? Definitely not. I adore this crazy pooch every bit as much as Koda. But, Shoba has a much easier temperament for home transfer and I feel that THEY have to come first. Better for my feelings to be hurt than to have them constantly fighting and hurting each other.
 

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Well, this "breeder" certainly is a piece of work. I do hope the flat out gave you the puppy they were planning on dumping.
I agree....wow. Great responsible breeder. I would not even give them any $ whatsoever. Sad for that puppy they couldn't stand by and do the right thing for.
 

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If you want to keep them both, don't let them spend too much time together. They need to bond with you and not one another. Maybe your significant other can be responsible for one and you the other. Let them bond with each of you. Find a good trainer to help you. Really work and train them well.
It can work with two females, but if you find that they just can't get along you can rehome a well trained GSD. I hope the heart problems fix themselves.
 

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Isn't there a saying along the lines of "Dogs fight for breeding rights. Bitches fight for breathing right."?
Ha! I'd never heard this one before but I love it.

OP: this article may be helpful. Problems Associated With Adopting Two Puppies at the Same Time - Whole Dog Journal Article (hopefully it's not paywalled, I never can tell with WDJ).

Even though you've decided to keep these two, read through the first page anyway because if you know what the common problems are, you'll be able to keep an eye out for them and forestall them at the first sign of trouble.
 
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