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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello,

We are in search of our new forever friends. We had 2 beautiful GSD's Cagney and Lacey for 12/13 years litter mates that seemed to have a very strong bond. They behaved better into adult hood, however in the beginning it was a bit of mayhem getting them to be responsive to us. We were considering getting one puppy now and then another later in a few months, but now we are thinking that it might be best to just go through puppy stage once and get two puppies again together.

We were thinking this time that we might get 2 puppies(GSD females) from 2 different litters around the same age as that might help with the issue of them being bonded so close in the beginning and more respectful of our pack leadership. Appreciate thoughts and suggestions.

Thanks in advance.
 

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It doesn't matter if they are related or not. You will have the same issues as with litter mates. Personally I would wait until the oldest is two years old.
 

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A lot of people will tell you that two puppies at once is not such a great thing, and two females may fight, especially down the road. It is doable, but getting two that are approximately the same age means they could be close in power and might constantly be at each other. While two males are often ok if raised together, and a male and female is the best combination. But I take it you raised Cagney and Lacy and other than how they bonded, you really didn't have issues? Are they both females then?

I really don't know if getting them from two litters will help with the bonding together. A new puppy just out of its own litter will be looking to bond to whoever is available to bond to. And if there is another puppy about the same age, and they are raised together, chances are they will have a pretty tight bond.
 

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It doesn't matter if they are related or not. You will have the same issues as with litter mates. Personally I would wait until the oldest is two years old.
Different dogs are different. You can have some issues that are worse than your other pair, and you can have some issues that are less of a problem. I have raised a number of littermates and have not experienced the problem with bonding more between the dogs than with me.

Waiting for two to four years between puppies means puppy A is pretty well trained and can help in the training of puppy B, and when puppy A become geriatric, Puppy B is generally still going strong. Sometimes when they are raised together all their lives, when the one goes, the other goes shortly after, which is a double-whammie as now the house is totally empty and you have had your heart wrenched twice.
 

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Cagney and Lacey got along very well- they loved each other Cagney passed away last May from DM and Lacey in February also from DM. The biggest issue we had was the fact they it was really difficult training them and socializing them without being dragged everywhere, before they learned appropriate obedience cues and even after Cag bless her had to always be first. Loading in the car, out the door, etc. She was very sweet and loving however she was the boss to Lacey. Lacey watched the door and made sure the house was secure and was very accepting of her position.
 

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Male/female combos tend to work better than two females together.

I think it would be better to get one pup first, wait a year or two until they are trained and well behaved enough that they are a positive role model, then get your second pup.

Here are a whole bunch of other reasons why it is better to do just one puppy at the time:

http://www.germanshepherds.com/foru...67994-should-i-get-two-puppies-dogs-once.html
 

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Hello,

We are in search of our new forever friends. We had 2 beautiful GSD's Cagney and Lacey for 12/13 years litter mates that seemed to have a very strong bond. They behaved better into adult hood, however in the beginning it was a bit of mayhem getting them to be responsive to us. We were considering getting one puppy now and then another later in a few months, but now we are thinking that it might be best to just go through puppy stage once and get two puppies again together.

We were thinking this time that we might get 2 puppies(GSD females) from 2 different litters around the same age as that might help with the issue of them being bonded so close in the beginning and more respectful of our pack leadership. Appreciate thoughts and suggestions.

Thanks in advance.
Ok I've had two littermates, boys and now I have to little lab mixes not littermates. A ton of people are going to tell you not to do two at once. I have no problem with it. If you have the time and money go for it. I personally wouldn't do two females, but that is your choice. I really don't see a difference between the bond between the two littermates I had and the two non-litttermates, but close in age, pups. They are close and that is the nature of having two. Some people want the dog to bond only with them. I don't get that. I love they have friends... I think they bond with me just fine and I enjoy having a pack.

I am an only child and it sucked! I think two not only increases costs and the work but it also increases the fun and the joy. Its hard when they pass close to each other but totally worth it in my book.
 

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You have raised littermates. So you know the pit falls, and stuff. You also know that it can work out, and if you want both females, sometimes that can work better if they are raised from babies, they determine who is who, when they are unlikely to kill each other, and in your case, they stuck to that all along.

But, that was 11/12 years ago. Something I always tell my dad 60 does not = 40. Well it's been a few years since then, I said that to my sister last week 40 does not equal 20. I don't know about you, but I had WAY more energy 10-12 years ago. Raising, training and socializing a pair of puppies at this stage in the game is a little more daunting.

And the other thing is we often forget how bad it was when they were little. Love makes us blind to that when they have been so good for so long. Maybe it is a little disloyal when they are very old or passing or just passed to recall any of the joys of puppyhood.
 

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But, that was 11/12 years ago. Something I always tell my dad 60 does not = 40. Well it's been a few years since then, I said that to my sister last week 40 does not equal 20. I don't know about you, but I had WAY more energy 10-12 years ago. Raising, training and socializing a pair of puppies at this stage in the game is a little more daunting.

And the other thing is we often forget how bad it was when they were little. Love makes us blind to that when they have been so good for so long. Maybe it is a little disloyal when they are very old or passing or just passed to recall any of the joys of puppyhood.
Actually Selzer for me its a lot easier now than it was 11 years ago when I raised Buddy and Shadow. I know the tricks. I know how to wear them out and what keeps them busy, what to buy for them to chew on. And heck one thing that is much easier now is that I can afford it much better. LOL I also am not raising kids at the same time so I have more time to spend giving individual attention. :)
 

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Very good points.. I have aged with our girls.. So much to consider. On the one had it's great for them to have doggie companionship and also for us to go through puppy stage once - as we plan on an extended canine family. Kids are teens so they are more interested in their gadgets.. Ideally the answer is one at a time but then the visit to the breeders and all those beautiful babies just waiting to go home -may lead to us driving away with more than one. So much to consider.
 

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Cagney and Lacey got along very well- they loved each other Cagney passed away last May from DM and Lacey in February also from DM. The biggest issue we had was the fact they it was really difficult training them and socializing them without being dragged everywhere, before they learned appropriate obedience cues and even after Cag bless her had to always be first. Loading in the car, out the door, etc. She was very sweet and loving however she was the boss to Lacey. Lacey watched the door and made sure the house was secure and was very accepting of her position.
Just wanted to add I'm sorry for your loses... DM really sucks. We lost Shadow to DM at 9. Thankfully his littlermate Buddy is still going strong at 11. He is really enjoying watching the lab pups play and running after them. I had to up his food intake because he lost so much weight playing.

Also another thing to consider is adopting. Our last several dogs have come from rescue or shelter. So many cute babies needing homes.
 

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i would get a puppy and once that pup is well trained and
highly socialized i would get another pup.
 

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i would get a puppy and once that pup is well trained and
highly socialized i would get another pup.
Me too.

Why take a chance when you know you can raise one perfect pup at a time. Easier for the pup and for you.

As far as wanting to help the breeder by taking more pups off their hands, truth is there are ALWAYS puppies being born and they will need homes in the future and you'll be helping them out.

PLEASE take the time to read --> http://www.germanshepherds.com/foru...67994-should-i-get-two-puppies-dogs-once.html

and not just listen to all our short answers and responses. There a links from top trainers/breeders.

Which frankly makes me a bit leery on your breeder considering giving you two puppies anyways. Most of the best breeders care more for their puppies than what a potential owner thinks they want and wouldn't consider giving 2 of their pups to the same person except in rare instances.
 

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Me too.

Why take a chance when you know you can raise one perfect pup at a time. Easier for the pup and for you.

As far as wanting to help the breeder by taking more pups off their hands, truth is there are ALWAYS puppies being born and they will need homes in the future and you'll be helping them out.

PLEASE take the time to read --> http://www.germanshepherds.com/foru...67994-should-i-get-two-puppies-dogs-once.html

and not just listen to all our short answers and responses. There a links from top trainers/breeders.

Which frankly makes me a bit leery on your breeder considering giving you two puppies anyways. Most of the best breeders care more for their puppies than what a potential owner thinks they want and wouldn't consider giving 2 of their pups to the same person except in rare instances.
:rolleyes: Apparently you missed that the OP has successfully done it before and is not a first time dog owner.

There are many, many good breeders out there that will let you buy two puppies. There are a few on this board that won't. That doesn't make them the BEST breeders.
 

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The OP is wondering if getting two puppies again is a good idea. There were some issues with raising two that he wasn't sure if it was due to having two puppies together, or if the issues would be there if the puppies were brought into the home one at a time.

I'd rather set someone up for success with suggestions that are doable, than set them, and the pups, up for failure by making something very demanding sound easy because one other person here has done it successfully. I think over the years, there has been quite a few more people saying that they did two puppies at the same time and they will never do it again! Pups may have turned out okay, but the effort and time is took was just exhausting.
 

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The OP is wondering if getting two puppies again is a good idea. There were some issues with raising two that he wasn't sure if it was due to having two puppies together, or if the issues would be there if the puppies were brought into the home one at a time.

I'd rather set someone up for success with suggestions that are doable, than set them, and the pups, up for failure by making something very demanding sound easy because one other person here has done it successfully. I think over the years, there has been quite a few more people saying that they did two puppies at the same time and they will never do it again! Pups may have turned out okay, but the effort and time is took was just exhausting.
Many many people have also raised two puppies together successfully and with no problems including breeders. It is not something I would recommend for a newbie but for someone who has already done it, and choose to do two puppies at once rather than go through puppy hood twice several years apart it makes sense. The OP having gone through it is already knowing what they are getting into. I believe the main question was getting two from the same litter or if getting two from different litters made a difference. My own opinion on that is no. They are equally as much joy and equally as much a pain in the butt.
 

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I would also add that being able to raise two pups together once does not mean that any other attempts are going to be as successful. For the average pet owner, raising two together (especially two females) is not a good idea and does end up being problematic.

OP, you say that one of your girls was clearly in charge, and the other was more submissive to that dog. How different would your one experience raising them together have been if both dogs had decided to be in charge? It doesn't matter if the pups are actual littermates or just two same-age pups being raised together. The behavior dynamics are the same.

I really want to stress that I am speaking as the average pet owner here. Slezer is a breeder, with multiple dog runs in her yard. And she does have dogs that don't like each other, so she rotates them in and out of the outside kennels. That is the experience that informs her opinion. Most pet owners don't have the luxury of multiple kennel runs, giving them the ability to keep dogs separated for the rest of their lives. Most of us bring dogs into our homes to be companions, not revolving kennel ornaments.

Which is not to bash Slezer, just to point out that her situation and experience is not the same as the OPs (or the majority of other pet owners), and her opinion is formed by her situation and experiences. Selzer, you sell a lot of puppies. Do you routinely sell multiple pups to the same home? If you do, what thought process do you put into making the decision about which puppy buyer can handle it and which buyer can't? Or do you figure that they have the right to get what they want and so will sell multiple pups to any buyer that requests it?

OP, I totally understand how attractive the idea of going through the puppy phase only once is! It can be rough, and some pups make it even rougher! But the rewards of doing it well are countless. I am willing to bet that if you were to purchase one pup, raise her or him to be the best dog possible and then in two or three years add another pup and raise that pup just as well, you will experience the benefits first hand and that experience will shift your whole mind set. The dogs that you end up with will make going through the puppy phase twice so worth it.

I am sorry for your double loss. Cagney and Lacey. I love those names! That show was a favorite of mine. And I wish you good luck in whatever puppy choice you make.
Sheilah
 

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Many many people have also raised two puppies together successfully and with no problems including breeders.
Many breeders have set ups that do NOT mimic the same lifestyle as the average pet owner. Many breeders have kennel runs, and they can easily keep warring bitches separated. I don't think breeders should be used at all to prove that same-age pups can be successfully raised together without incident. A breeder by definition has a different goal than the pet owner. It is comparing apples and oranges.

And for every one of those "many people" have "raised two puppies together successfully" there are three people who have not been able to do it successfully. And you know who ends up suffering because of those failures? The dogs. Not the people who thought they could handle it, or the idiots on some anonymous internet BB who encouraged it (not calling you an idiot, shepherdmom, I am talking in general terms). The dogs are the ones who suffer from the failure.
Sheilah
 
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