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Hi,

I'm still raw, scared and praying for a miracle for my 1.5yr male baby, Koda Braveheart!! He was in a horrific car accident when he was 4 months old. He broke his hip and pelvis, the sciatic never was served. During his 1st operation the dr left a piece of gauges inside of him, which caused a terrible infection, then all the hardware broke inside. He went back under to remove all the hardware and the dr did an FHO. His left hip foot knuckles which caused more infections. He has been going through this for 1 yr, and the dr is at the point that his leg can not be saved and wants to amputate. I'm a mess! I love my baby and don't want to see him in pain but once his leg is gone.......there's no way to replace it. I don't know any tri-pod dogs and i live on 2 acres, not sure how he'll be able to get around. I hoping to find 1 more dr that will take a look at him.....hoping to save his leg. It's hard for me to believe with all this new technology there's no way:frown2: to save it.
 

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I'm very sorry you are going through this. It sounds awful!

I live with a tri pod dog. She had her back right leg amputated at 3 years old. She gets around just fine, and she doesn't even seem to notice that she's missing a leg! She still runs around, goes up stairs, goes for walks, etc. I know it will be very difficult for you, but he'll come out of it okay. Dogs are much stronger and more resilient than we give them credit for.
 

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We've had several of hit-by-car dogs in rescue that needed amputations in order to live. They did fine. They adjust much faster than people do. They somehow manage stairs, romping, and being pretty active -- but they may not have the endurance of 4-legged dogs. Just like blindness, I think this is one of those things that's harder on the people and their expectations than it is for the actual dog.

They don't feel sorry for themselves. They get on with life. We can learn a lot from them!
 

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Was it the same doctor who did both surgeries? I agree with others about how easily dogs seem to adapt, but I would want a second opinion.
 

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If the worst thing is that he knuckles over, can you get him fitted with a bootie or a brace? He will be okay on three legs when he is young but it will take a toll on his joints when he is older. If he uses the leg, I would do what you can to save it.
 

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A very good friend of mine had a tripod chow. That dog lived to be 17 years old and was a king of hearts and one of the best dogs I've ever known. He got around just fine as a youngster. When he got older he did have mobility problems but that made him a great lap dog. He required some extra care because he couldn't take himself out to the bathroom or come back in when he was older, so our friend had to carry him from place to place. Still ruled his roost and kept all the other dogs (pugs, if you can believe it) in line, even as an old immobile dog. He looked like a great hairy lion keeping watch over his domain, until he saw a person, and then he would roll over and beg for belly rubs.

My father has a blind dog. His blind dog plays ball better than all his other sighted dogs (they're all goldens.) They do adapt, and while it is an unfortunate circumstance it's not the end for them. However, I agree with others - I would seek a second opinion just for peace of mind, as well as to confirm your current vet's recommendation. I also wonder if a brace might be an option?
 

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I am so sorry. But...he survived a horrible accident! I once attended a Frisbee competition where there was an Aussie with one rear leg. It took a me short while seeing him compete to notice it. He looked like a normal happy and active dog. If he does need the amputation, make sure he stays as lean as possible to limit the weight on his one leg. He will probably be very muscular in front. Do what you can to save the leg but try to keep it in balance with the pain he is enduring. Please keep us posted.
 
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