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Hello all, so I ave posted a little on here before kind of about the same issue. Our puppy Harley 21 weeks old now. We got her at 8 weeks old and probably about 9 weeks she had gotten a rash, and still has it. In the beginning we found she had a UTI, and treated for that. Finally after a couple rounds of medicine the bacteria went away but the rash persisted. The last round of medicine she was on took the rash away, but she was still constantly biting and scratching. I tried benedryl to maybe help the itching but that didn’t work. The vet has said it’s probably some kind of allergy. Gave us a steroid to help control the itching and also some medicated shampoo. Our breeder said we shouldn’t give a puppy steroids. I of course want her to get better but I don’t want to damage her more either. So just curious what everyone’s thoughts are on the whole situation. If you have used steroids on puppy’s. I don’t want to just keep giving her medicine either. The vet was just saying the steroid is to get it under control and we can get a game plan from there. Any help is appreciated.
 

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I agree with your vet. I have chased symptoms of allergies for years, chased the limited diet food...OTC allergy meds...made excuses for the humidity... and just finally did testing last week. Serious allergy to dust mites and grasses. No protein allergies at all.

Look into to Cytopoint to stop the itching. It's not a steroid. Will stop the itching immediately. Have blood drawn and send it out of for testing. It costs $186 for the environmental panel and $186 for the food panel.
 

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I agree with Jax. My last girl had food allergies but a lot of her itching continued on a diet I found that worked for her. The vet told me from the get go he had a feeling she had food allergies as well as environmental so the food would help but not solve her issue.
 

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If I had to do it all over, I would have jut done the testing years ago instead of listening to internet chatter on limited diets, holistic remedies, blah blah blah. All it did was cost him years of discomfort and me a lot of money.
 

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If I had to do it all over, I would have jut done the testing years ago instead of listening to internet chatter on limited diets, holistic remedies, blah blah blah. All it did was cost him years of discomfort and me a lot of money.
I wonder if Cytopoint would help Rusty in the Fall. I'm almost certain his allergy grief is environmental. As soon as the leaves start to Fall he get's super itchy. When the ground freezes he's usually fine, UNLESS the itching turned into a bacterial infection on his skin, then we have a whole other set of issues to get through. Most of Winter, Spring and Summer he's fine.
 

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A medicated shampoo (antimicrobial) only helps if you use it frequently -- getting the contact allergens off, and knocking down the bacteria load. We have to use it weekly when we're recovering a foster dog with skin issues. The goal is to keep from having to put them on antibiotics for bacterial infections secondary to allergies! (KEEP OFF OF THE HEAD & AWAY FROM THE EYES--USE BELOW THE NECK ONLY.)

This is an example of the type antimicrobial shampoo recommended by our vet -- and sometimes by vet derms:
https://www.amazon.com/Dechra-TrizChlor-4-Shampoo-8-Ounce/dp/B00K4X8TF6

In our rescue, we sometimes get chronically itchy dogs a prescription for Apoquel. Once we get things settled down, we always hope to get them off of it, if we can -- and that's usually possible. It runs about $100/mo., give or take. Fall and Spring seem to be the bad seasons for the dogs that have environmental allergies. I'm not sure how Apoquel and Cytopoint compare -- I think they may be competing drugs from different manufacturers, so it's likely worth asking your vet pros and cons of each. I also have no idea if they can be given to pups -- we've always used Apoquel in adult dogs.


My healthcare philosophy is "whatever works." If that's pharma, then use the pharma. If that's "woo," use the woo. A lot of woo doesn't work or is an outright scam--despite having a dedicated Internet cheerleading squad; occasionally some natural stuff really well. The challenge is figuring out the difference. Some good vets are pretty helpful in sorting it out. More often than not, when natural stuff works well, there's a chemical reason -- it's chemistry doing the work, and knowing the pros and cons of chemicals is as important for natural ones as synthetic ones (tea tree oil is a good example of something natural that is antimicrobial, but also potentially toxic at relatively low doses to pets). I really think the vet needs to be part of decision process as you research and explore -- a good vet will help you separate the useless and dangerous Internet suggestions from the possibly helpful ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We mentioned apoquel to the vet and he said it isnt recommended for puppy’s. He also said we shouldn’t resort to testing for allergies yet. I assume he just says that because it could be something she grows out of so why spend the money? I just didn’t want to hurt any of her organs or anything if the steroid is too strong. I will have to look into the cytopoint
 

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I own a chronically itchy dog. My life sucks. According to my vets( she has several) the food allergies contribute to the itching only mildly with the exception of beef which gives her hives and colostrum which causes runny eyes, and uncontrollable itching. Environmental allergies are extremely difficult to deal with without drugs.
I live in Calgary and have had three dogs allergic to the grass here. How do you keep your dog off the ground? Shadow gets the full whammy, allergic to grass, pollen, dust mites and I needed to stop using dryer sheets.

But something I wanted to bring up, she was biting at herself a lot and someone suggested spinal problems. I started doing gentle spine massage and tail pulls and reduced her biting a lot. If I miss a few days it starts up again. I also put her on NEM and stopped the biting on her one front leg entirely.


So while I am all for allergy testing, it is also worth checking other things as well since an awful lot of what we thought was allergies turned out to be pain or nerve discomfort.
 

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Zoetis U.S. website says Cytopoint is safe for dogs of all ages. https://www.zoetisus.com/products/dogs/cytopoint/


It has been a lifesaver for my 11 year old, in conjunction with weekly antimicrobial baths as Magwart describes. As Jax said, too much time wasted with a vast variety of treatments, natural and pharmaceutical. At 11, I want Quinn to be comfortable and enjoy his life,
 
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So we are going to get a second opinion on Monday, I figured it wouldn’t hurt. We were actually talking to someone else from our breeder and actually had the same sire. She has all the same issues only a year ahead of us. They finally ended up getting it under control, so we are going to that vet in hopes maybe the issues are similar. I guess we will soon find out. And we don’t really use any type of floor cleaners often enough that I would think they should effect her. We used an enzyme cleaner for the occasional accident. Than usually just a steam clean on the tile now and than.
 
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